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A. Wayne Webb

A long time historian of the German Baptist Brethren church, and its more modern derivative bodies, Mr. Webb has moved on to become a recognized authority in digitally archiving manuscripts, both published works as well as singular documents.  He served as the Editor of Brethren Roots, 2002 to 2008, as published by The Fellowship of Brethren Genealogists.  To that end he has created and maintains a series of Internet web sites devoted to his passion, German Baptist Brethren history.

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 350

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    TO CINCINNATI. BY EDWARD A. M'LAUGHLIN (1798-?). [This poem appeared as one of a collection printed in Cincinnati in 1841. The general title of the book was "Lovers of the Deep." To any one who is acquainted with the culture of Cincinnati the prophetic vision of the poet can be keenly appreciated.] City of gardens, verdant parks, sweet bowers; Blooming upon thy bosom, bright and fair, Wet with the dews of spring and summer's showers, And fanned by every breath of wandering air; Rustling the foliage of thy green groves, where The blue-bird's matin wakes the smiling morn, And sparkling humming-birds of plumage rare, With tuneful pinions on the zephyrs borne, Disport the flowers among, and glitter and adorn: Fair is thy seat, in soft recumbent rest Beneath the grove-clad hills; whence morning wings The gentle breezes of the fragrant west, That kiss the surface of a thousand spring: Nature, her many-colored mantle flings Around thee, and adorns thee as a bride; While polished Art his gorgeous tribute brings, And dome and spire ascending far and wide Their pointed shadows dip in thy Ohio's tide. So fair in infancy—O what shall be Thy blooming prime expanding like the rose In fragrant beauty; when a century Hath passed upon thy birth and time bestows The largess of a world that freely throws Her various tribute from remotest shores, To enrich the western Rome: Here shall repose Science and art; and from times subtile ores—Nature's unfolded page-knowledge enrich her stores. Talent and Genius to thy feet shall bring Their brilliant offerings of immortal birth: Display the secrets of Pieria's spring, Castalia's fount of melody and mirth: Beauty and grace and chivalry and worth,

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 81

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    BRO. SCHNELL'S JOURNEY TO VIRGINIA, FROM OCTOBER 12-DECEMBER 24, 1749. Herewith follows a list of the places and miles which we traveled: Miles. From Bethlehem to Lancaster, . . . . . 70 To the Susquehana, . . . . . . . 10 To Yorktown,. . . . . . . . . 2 To Caspar Schmidt in Canawake, . . . . . 18 Across the Mesch Crick and Rock Crick and Middle Crick to Jacob Mathias, . . . . . . . 35 To Jacob Woeller at the Monakesy, . . . . 5 To Frederickstown, . . . . . . . 15 To George Gump, . . . . . . . . 4 Across the mountains and Antidam Crick to Jonathan Haeger, . . . . . . . . . 24 To the Canegetschik River, . . . . . . 5 Up along the Betomek across the Licken Crick and the Knatte Weh, to Carl Bock, . . . . . 25 To Colonel Crisop, without finding a house and across many mountains, the High German, the Fifteen Mile Crick and three other cricks, . . . . . 35 Across the North Brentch to Urban Craemer, . . . .10 Up along the South Brentch to Math. Joachim, . . 30 To George Zeh across the Cap [Gap], . . . . 12 Back again to Joachim, . . . . . . . .2 To Michel Stump, . . . . . . . . 6 To Anthon Richer and Peter Rith, . . . 9 To Rogert Dayer (eight miles without a house), . . 5 To Bastian Huber, . . . . . . . . 6 Without house to the end of the South Fork and part of the way along the Clober Creek to Wulsen [Wilson], 20 To George Luys [Lewis], a Welshman, . . . . I7 Twelve times across the Clober Creek, a pretty broad water, to James Scot, . . . . . . 30 Across James Rever [ James River] to Kroffort [Crawford], 13

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 60

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    compelled us to rest on the road for a while. We took our dinner with an Englishman. In the evening we came to a German. When he heard that we were from Bethlehem and I a preacher, he asked us for our own sakes to return to Pennsylvania at once, as a notice13 had been posted on the courthouse that all preachers should be arrested who traveled without a passport from England. July 23rd. We went to William Frey's brother, distant four miles, but we needed four hours, as we lost the way. When we came to Benjamin Frey, at the Cedar Creek, and they heard that we were from Bethlehem, they received us very gladly and nursed the sick Leonard very well. May the Lord reward then. July 24th. To-day I went to an elder14 living at the Schanathor [Shenandoah] River. I asked him if I could preach in his church. But he hesitated because I was a stranger, and an injunction had been issued agaiinst strange ministers. But he would allow me to preach in his house, which I accepted, and then he made it known. I went back to Cedar Creek to my dear Handrup. July 25th. The Lord blessed our medicine and Leonhard became well again. We passed the Sabbath quietly. July 26th. Sunday. I preached on the gospel,15 the Lord 13 This refers to the Governor's proclamation, given in connection with Gottschalk's report of 1748. See Virginia Magazine, Vol. XI, p. 228, note ‡. 14 This elder at the Shenandoah River must have been George Daehlinger. Gottschalk refers to this visit of Schnell in 1748. See Virginia Magazine, Vol. XI, p. 228, and his diary in the present number, under date April 3, 1748. Schnell himself refers to his former visit on Decenmber 7, 1749. See Virginia Mfagazine, Vol. XI, p. 128. A congregation, called Shenandoah, is mentioned in Schlatter's Journal, p. 204: "The charge in Virginia consists of Shenandoah, Missanotti, South Branch and New Germantown." The same name also occurs several times in the records of the Reformed Church. See Minutes and Letters of the Coetus of Pennsylvania, 1747-1792, pp. 37 and 250. George Daehlinger was probably related to John Dallinger, who lived within two miles of Strasburg and was killed by the Indians in 1764. Kercheval, History of the Valley, ed. 1833, p. 133. 15 In his Special Report, Schniell adds the following: "At the 'Chanetor' [Shenandoah] River I preached, but with great difficulty, as if all

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