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A. Wayne Webb

A long time historian of the German Baptist Brethren church, and its more modern derivative bodies, Mr. Webb has moved on to become a recognized authority in digitally archiving manuscripts, both published works as well as singular documents.  He served as the Editor of Brethren Roots, 2002 to 2008, as published by The Fellowship of Brethren Genealogists.  To that end he has created and maintains a series of Internet web sites devoted to his passion, German Baptist Brethren history.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 115

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 115 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 115

    Pennsylvania Synods) were held during the years 1742-1748. At first the various denominations were largely represented, but when it was found out that the influence of the Moravians was predominant, most of the other religionists withdrew. Those who remained, although forming for a while a distinct element, ultimately entered the Moravian church, when it was fully organized as a separate denomination in the twenty-eighth Synod, held in Bethlehem, October 23-27, 1748. These Pennsylvania Synods carried on a most varied activity. They founded numerous congregations and maintained day schools and boarding schools at ten different places in Pennsylvania. They sent missionaries to the Danish West Indies to labor among the negroes, and to the States of New York and Connecticut to labor among the Indians. When the Indians were expelled through the hostility of the white settlers, a new Indian settlement was begun at Gnadenhutten, at the junction of the Mahony creek and the Lehigh river. But perhaps the most important work was done by a large number of itinerant missionaries, who traveled through all the middle colonies to preach the gospel to German settlers of whatsoever denomination, who were willing to hear them. Beginhing with 1743, these missionaries visited Virginia repeatedly. Their diaries, which are now published for the first time, give us the most valuable and detailed information about the German settlers in Virginia. EXTRACTS FROM THE DIARY OF LEONHARD SCHNELL* AND JOHN BRANDMUELLER† OF THEIR JOURNEY TO VIRGINIA, OCTOBER 12-DECEMBER 12, 1749. [The beginning of the diary, covering the journey from Bethlehem to Monocacy, has been omitted.] On October 26th, I started out with Bro. Brandmueller, after * Leonhard Schnell arrived in Philadelphia with" The First Sea Congregation," on June 7, 1742. Ordained a Presbyter in 1748. Itinerated in Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia. Withdrew from the Moravians in 1751, and took charge of the Lutheran congregations of Macungie and Saucon. Pennsylvania. † John Brandmueller, born November 24. 1704, at Basle, Switzerland. Came to America with .. The First Sea Congregation." Ordained by

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 228

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 228 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 228

    They are endeavoring to secure a true Lutheran minister, but thus far they have not been able to get one. About thirty miles further, several other German families live together, among them George Daehlinger, at whose house Bro. Schnell lodged and preached.* Some of the people are hostile, others welI-meaning, but all timid and suspicious, and for this reason are not willing to listen to the brethren. They have written to Pennsylvania for a true Lutheran minister, but have not been able to secure one. IV. CEDAR CREEK. This is a branch of the "Chanador" river, on which also many German people live, among others Jost Haydt, a justice, and Benjamin Frey, the brother of William Frey† [of Falkner Swamp, Pa.] The proclamation of the Governor‡ has made the people timid and suspicious towards us, there as well as at the "Chanador," so that they do not want to hear us. * Rev. Mr. SchneII preached here on July 26, 1747, as will be shown later. He preached again at his house on December 7, 1749, but spells his name "Daelinger," as was shown in the last number of this MAGAZINE, Vol. XI, p. 128. † See A. Reincke, Register of Moravians, pp. 67, 84. ‡ The Proclamation of the Governor is as follows: Proclamation by the Honble Sir William Gooch, His Majesty's Lieutenant Governor and Commander·in·Chief of the Colony and Dominion of Virginia: Whereas it is represented to me that several Itinerant Preachers have lately crept into this Colony, and that the suffering those corrupters of our Faith and true Religion to propagate their shocking doctrines may be of mischievous consequences— I have, therefore, thought fit by and with the advice of His Majesty 's Council to issue this Proclamation, strictly requiring all Magistrates and Officers to discourage and prohibit as far as legally they can all Itinerant Preachers, whether New Lights, Moravians, or Methodists, from teaching, preaching or holding any meetings in this Colony—And that all such persons be ·enjoined to be aiding and assisting to that purpose. Given under my hand and seal at Williamsburg this third day of April, 1747, and in the twentieth year of His Majesty's Reign. God save the King. See Moravian of January 6. 1886.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 236

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 236 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 236

    tydum [Antietam] and Canigotschik [Conococheague]. Major Monday went with them ftom "Manakesy" to the South Branch of the "Potomack." On July 12th, they passed over the South Mountain and came on the same day to the "Canigotschik," where they inspected a remarkable cave, which passes through the earth for 300 yards. In its opening 1,000 people can stand, then it separates into two branches. * * * * On the way they stopped at the house of the daughter of old father Loescher, and then they came to Jonathan Haeger, a friend of the brethren. Here they stayed over night. During a song service, held in the evening, Bro. Joseph baptized two children. The one was a daughter of Jonathan Haeger, the other a grand-daughter of Father Loescher. Jonathan Haeger intends to visit the congregation at Bethlehem before long. On July 13th, they started early. They visited several plantations and then came to Captain Baret, where Bro. Joseph preached to a number of people in English, with much blessing. They stayed there over night. On July 14th, they took their way northwest over the high mountains, which are generally called Blue or North Ridge, passing the mountain called "High Germany." In that district they saw the famous springs or mineral waters [literally fountain of health]. There are really six springs, rising close together, at the foot of a precipitous mountain, and forming a pretty large creek. The water is warm, not nauseous, but strong. They found only three people there. On July 16th, they came to Colonel Christopher Grissop,* who owns there a fertile piece of land. towards the source of the "Potomack," having bought it from the "Shawanos."‡ As it was late, they stayed there over night. On Sunday, July 17th, Bro. Joseph preached there an English sermon to a considerable number of people. They left on the * His name ought to be Colonel Thomas Cresap. He settled at Old Town. Alleghany county, Maryland, in 1741. See Scharf, History of Western Maryland, p. 1458. ‡ The Shawnee Indians. whose most easterly settlement was near the present site of Winchester, Virginia.

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