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The menu system utilized to access the books can be difficult to understand.  It could have been simpler in design, if only the various books themselves had fallen into one larger overriding category.  Such, however, is not the case.  This site will eventually house books covering those states for which there have been district histories and other more generalized books.

In the case of the various district histories there are many states that are split into three, or more, districts.  Pennsylvania has four districts: Eastern, Middle, Southern and Western.  And, each district may have more than one published history; such as the 1920 and 1955 histories for the Southern District of Ohio.  Thus there will be under the District menu link (when it is created) a link for Ohio > Southern District > 1920 as well as a 1955 menu item.  The menus will be logical in nature so that should be fairly easy to follow.

Such may not be the case for other Brethren historical works.  For instance, as of this writing there are two books online, The Minutes of the Annual Meetings of the Brethren — 1778 - 1917 and Some Who Led — Or — Fathers in the Church of the Brethren Who Have Passed Over.  One book is a biographical work while the other is non-biographical in nature.  Thus under the General menu link there will be a sub-menu item for each, Biographical and Non-biographical.

The only other envisioned menu item is one entitled "Congregational," or named something alike it, for the various and numerous congregations for which there are published histories.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 130

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 130 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 130

    mueller had fallen into the Cedar Creek and had become wet, he had an opportunity at Frey's to dry himself. On Sunday, December 10th, we hastened early to the old Mr. Funk, where we had appointed a sermon. When we arrived we found a good number of people, to whom I preached of the Saviour. After the sermon one of the sons told us that yesterday a man had come to them, having traveled fourteen miles, to ask them not to permit us to preach. But the son said that the request came too late, as the sermon had already been appointed. He was therefore compelled to return without gaining his end. The people in the house where we preached were very kind to us. We took leave of old Mr. Funk and his four sons, one of whom is a captain, and traveled a few miles, staying over night with a Mennonite. But as he was under the influence of whiskey, we could not speak of anything sensible to him. On December 11th, we visited the old Jost Hayd.* However, we did not stay long with him, but continued our journey to Fredericktown, in "Obeken."† where we called on a German shoemaker. Then we traveled ten miles further to an Englishman with whom we stayed over night, On December 12th, we started two hours before day break, because we could not rest well during the night. In the afternoon we came to the "Patomack," where the ferryman [at Watkins' Ferry] took us over. He asked us to send him one of our books from which he could learn our teaching. This * Joist Hite, the pioneer settler of the lower Valley, and the most enterprising of all the German settlers in that section. He was one of the first justices of Orange county, in 1734, which then embraced the present county of Frederick within its limits. For a full account of him and his family, see the April number, 1903, of the West Virginia Historical Magazine.† Fredericktown is the old town of Winchester; see journal of Rev. Michael Schlatter, in Life of Rev. Michael Schlatter, by Dr. H. Harbaugh, Philadelphia, 1857, p. 173; note 2. "Opequon" is now the name of a little town near Winchester. It seems to have been at that time the name of the whole district in which Winchester is situated.

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  • About

    This series of images are courtesy of JStor and meet their copyrights as covered under Terms and Conditions of Use for Early Journal Content.  The images herein displayed come from various articles published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography published in 1903, 1904 and 1905.  For specific volume and issue number see each series herein represented.  Each image was OCRed and the resultant text placed within a hidden HTML element, facilitating the search engine of this site.

    This series of images represents the translations, in part, from the German to English of several diaries of Moravian missionaries of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania during their travels through Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia.  They are a wealthy of knowledge for German Baptist Brethren historians and researchers and are thus brought together for the first time.  Assuredly a debt of gratitude is owed to Rev. William J. Hinke and Charles E. Kemper.

    Note:  though the last image in this series states that the series was to be continued, it never was.  A search thru 1912 of The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography failed to locate the continuation.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 122

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 122 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 122

    On November 13th, we started early. A German woman gave us a piece of bread and cheese for the way. A man who traveled our way to-day was of much assistance to us, as we had no house for twenty miles. Moreover, the forest was very dense, and it was difficult to find the way. To-day we came to the source of the South Fork* and, although we had to cross the water more than thirty times. (the people had urgently warned us not to take this road as we had no horse), yet the Lamb helped us safely through all difficulties. In the evening we lodged in an English cabin (thus they call the English houses there). It was quite cold. But the bear skins upon which we rested and the fire before us which kept us warm, rendered us good services. We had yet a piece of bread left, and as the people had none, we divided it with them. They gave us some of their bear meat, which can be found in every house in this district. On November 14th. we went on our way with a happy feeling. We had to wade through the water frequently. We stayed with a Welshman over night, but he did not trust us very much. We engaged him to take us through the river with his horse, because it is quite large; it is called "Kauh Pastert."† On November 15th, we traveled in the company of a Welshman, George Luys; he took us twelve times through the river [Clover Creek, Highland County]. Traveling was difficult to-day, for we had to cross rather high mountains, and, moreover it rained. Night overtook us before we reached a house and had passed through the water. At last we could no longer see the way and had to stay wht!re we were. Fortunately. we found a little hut, in which no one was at home. Here we stayed. thanking God for the shelter. We made fire, and after drying our clothes we * The South Fork of the South Branch rises in the extreme southern portion of Pendleton county, West Virginia. † Cow Pasture River. The missionaries were then within the limits of the present county of Highland. and probably reached the James River in the vicinity of Clifton Forge. From there the missionaries seem to have followed the road to Fincastle, Botetourt county, to Salem, Roanoke county, to Christiansburg, Montgomery county, and finally to the neighborhood of Newbern, in Pulaski county.

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