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Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 368 [Click for larger image]Page 368

CELEBRATION OF THE SURRENDER OF GENERAL JOHN H. MORGAN. An account by Morgan’s Captor, Major George W. Rue On September 21, 1910, there was celebrated on the Crubaugh Farm, South of Lisbon, Columbiana county, near the historic spot where the event occurred, the 47th Anniversary of the Surrender of the Confederate Raider, General Morgan. Concerning the celebration the East Liverpool Tribune of September 22 , 1910, made the following comment: Romance and intrigue combined to make history in that hot July of 1863, when handsome, foolhardy General John H. :Morgan, cavalier debonaire of the southland, and idol of the famous blue grass region of Kentucky, dashed from under cover of his native heath, through Indiana, into Ohio, and finally reached the highest point ever attained by a Confederate force before he was captured on the Crubaugh farm near West Point by another equally as intrepid as himself, also a Kentuckian by birth, but arrayed on the side of the Union, Major George W. Rue. Morgan, the Confederate raider, has passed into the great beyond, but yesterday East Liverpool and Columbiana county was honored by the presence of his captor, Major George W. MAJOR GEO. W . RUE.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 142

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

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    again soon came to water. We still had four miles to Jost Haid's mill.16 We pitched our tent beyond the mill. Bro. Jacob Loesch again joined us, after having been on several plantations to buy bread and oats, but he had gotten little. We put our horses in a meadow, as we had no more feed for them. Bro. Lisher and Merkli stayed with them at night. Bro. Gottlob conducted the evening worship. We lay down soon afterwards for a good rest under our tent. On October 19, we rose at six o'clock, but we had not slept much, because the smoke had annoyed us considerably. One mile from here we had some bread baked for us, and towards nine o'clock we continued our journey. Several brethren preceded us two and a half miles to Mr. Neuschwanger,17 a German, 16 In connection with Jost Haid's mill, the following petition from the records of Orange counity will be of interest: To the worshipful his Majesty's Justices of Orange county. The petition of sundry inhabitants of Opeckon sheweth: That yr. Petioners at present lay under great inconveniency for want of a Road from Just Hyte's Mill to Ashby's bent Ford on Shenando, humbly pray that yr. worships will order that a wagon road be cleared. And yr. Petitioners, etc. David Vance, *Ulrich Bucher, Abrm. Hollingsworth, Robert Allane, William Hog, Robert Smith, Peter Wolff. Benj. Booden [Borden], Richard Wood, *Johannes Stockli, Joseph Calwer, Charles McDowell, John Harrow, Nathanael Thomas, *Jerg Dieter, Jno. Nation, William Reed, Luke Vickery, Thomas Branson, Jr., Thomas Postgate, Robert Warth, James Vance, Ellis Thomas, Philip Kenney, Hugh De Vine, Isaac Perkins [Parkins], John Branson, William Vance, Edward Corder, John Gaskin, George Harreson, Isaac Davenport, John Hite, John McDowell, Geshem Woodel, Joseph Davenport, Charls. Barns, Robert Mackoy, George Bowman, *Abraham Weisman, *Jacob Weiss, Jacob Christman, Joseph Robins, *Gottfried Steffneha Gambeler. June Court 1739. [* The names marked * are written in German script.] At a court held for Orange county on February 22, 1738, the above petition was laid before the court, and it was ordered that Lewis Stephen and Jacob Niswanger lay out the road. On March 22, 1738, the two men reported the completion of their work. 17 This was Christian Newswanger, who landed in Philadelphia August 24, 1728. See Rupp's Collection of Thirty Thousand Names,

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 315

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    kers.] Their habit seems to be peculiar to themselves, consisting of a long tunic or coat, reaching down to their heels, with a sash or girdle round the waist, and a cap or hood hanging from the shoulders. They do not shave the head or beard. " 'The men and women have separate habitations and distinct governments. For these purposes they erected two large, wooden buildings, one of which is occupied by the brethren, the other by the sisters of the society; and in each of them there is a banqueting-room, and an apartment for public worship; for the brethren and sisters do not meet together even at their devotions. " 'They used to live chiefly upon roots and other vegetables, the rules of their society not allowing them ftesh, except upon particular occasions, when they hold what they call a love-feast, at which time the brethren and sisters dine together in a large apartment and eat mutton, but no other meat. [The Dunkers do perpetuate the Apostolic lovefeast - a-gape—at which the meat used is almost invariably mutton, or veal.] In each of their little cells they have a bench fixed, to serve the purpose of a bed, and a small block of wood for a pillow. They allow of marriages, but consider celebacy as a virtue. " 'The principal tenet of the Tunkers appears to be this—that future happiness is only to be obtained by penance and outward mortifications in this life, and that, as Jesus Christ, by his meritorious sufferings, became the Redeemer of mankind in general, so each individual of the human race, by a life of abstinence and restraint, may work out his own salvation. Nay, they go so far as to admit of works of supererogation, and declare that a man may do much more than he is in justice or equity obliged to do, and that his superabundant works may, therefore, be applied to the salvation of others.' " This is, perhaps, the climax, but there is more of the same sort. We can excuse Howe in some measure, perhaps, because he only followed in his account what he regarded as a trustworthy publication, and I have found almost the identical words that Howe quotes in Edwards' Enclycopaedia of Religious Know/edge; but he is grievously in error, nevertheless. As a matter of fact, many German Dunkers did settle in Botetourt county at an early period, and their descendants—most of them still Dunkers—number thousands in Botetourt and adjoining counties to-day; but what Howe says here is not descriptive, except in the particulars I have indicated, of these people, either then or now. What he says is, I suppose, true in the main of the Ephrata Society; but it is not, and never was, true of the Dunkers. The Dunkers have been confused not only with their ascetic off-shoot, the Ephrata Society, but also with other sects better known. I quote from the Schaff-Herzog Enc/ycopaedia of Religious Knowledge, Vol.

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