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Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 368 [Click for larger image]Page 368

CELEBRATION OF THE SURRENDER OF GENERAL JOHN H. MORGAN. An account by Morgan’s Captor, Major George W. Rue On September 21, 1910, there was celebrated on the Crubaugh Farm, South of Lisbon, Columbiana county, near the historic spot where the event occurred, the 47th Anniversary of the Surrender of the Confederate Raider, General Morgan. Concerning the celebration the East Liverpool Tribune of September 22 , 1910, made the following comment: Romance and intrigue combined to make history in that hot July of 1863, when handsome, foolhardy General John H. :Morgan, cavalier debonaire of the southland, and idol of the famous blue grass region of Kentucky, dashed from under cover of his native heath, through Indiana, into Ohio, and finally reached the highest point ever attained by a Confederate force before he was captured on the Crubaugh farm near West Point by another equally as intrepid as himself, also a Kentuckian by birth, but arrayed on the side of the Union, Major George W. Rue. Morgan, the Confederate raider, has passed into the great beyond, but yesterday East Liverpool and Columbiana county was honored by the presence of his captor, Major George W. MAJOR GEO. W . RUE.

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