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Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 483 [Click for larger image]Page 483

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 220

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 220 [Click for larger image]Page 220

    THE OHIO RIVER. ARCHER BUTLER HULBERT, Professor of American History, Marietta College; President of the Ohio Valley Historical Association; author of "Historic Highways of America," “The Ohio River,” etc. The mountain ranges of this Continent generally trend from North to South. The greatest rivers trend in the same general direction, particularly the St. Lawrence, Mississippi and Hudson, all of which were to play an important role as avenues of approach for the races which fell heir to the Continent. But the Europeans, landing on our Atlantic coast were compelled to explore and occupy the land along East and West lines, the social movement in general cutting straight across the general trend of the greater mountain ranges and river valleys. An interesting result followed. So far as actually playing a definite part in the western expansion of America is concerned, the lesser streams w ere of greater importance than many of the larger ones, and one cannot have a very clear understanding of the development of our Nation without knowing something of the place and power of the Juniata, Mohawk, Wood Creek, Connemaugh, Watauga, Holston, Fox and Wisconsin rivers. Said Edward Everett in 1835: "The destinies of the country, if I may use a language which sounds rather mystical but which every one, I believe, understands, — the destinies of the country run east and west". At the moment, when the building of the Boston and Albany Railroad was under discussion, the Housatonic was of more importance to New England than the Connecticut; if Boston nails were to continue their battle successfully against Pittsburg nails in the West the Housatonic would be responsible. Perhaps this introductory word will bring out as plainly as possible the one great important fact concerning the Ohio River its position on the Continent. It paralleled the "destinies of the

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 231

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 231 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 231

    An awakened shoemaker lives there, named Philip, who ought to be visited. Besides him, there is also a man, named Casper, an unmarried man and a weaver. He lives with one named Jaeger.* This man is also concerned about his salvation. The Rev. Mr. Klug sends his greetings to Bro. Joseph [Spangenberg], because he learned to know and love him on his arrival in Philadelphia, about ten years ago. VII. THE GREAT FORK OF THE RIPPEHANNING [RAPPAHANNOCK.†] It is situated about twenty-six miles from the Upper Germans towards the "Potomik." Three German families live there. * This was probably Nicholas Yager, a native of Wickersbach in Hesse (?) Germany, who was naturalized by Governor Spotswood July 13, 1722. He was then a resident of Spotsylvania county, Virginia. His son Adam was naturalized in 1730 by Governor Gooch. It is stated that he was born in Fulkenston, near Dusseldorf, in the duchy of Neuberg. See the Garr Genealogy, by John C. Garr, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1894. The descendants of Nicholas Yager are still to be found in Madison and adjoining counties of Virginia. † This was Germanna, founded in 1714, by Governor Spotswood. The first colonists consisted of twelve German Reformed families, who arrived in Virginia in the month of April, 1714. They came upon the solicitation of Baron de Graffenried to establish and operate for Governor Spotswood the iron works which they built about ten miles northwest of Fredericksburg. Their names were John Kemper, Jacob Holtzclaw, John and Herman Fishback, John Henry Hoffman, Herman Otterbach, Tillman Weaver, John Joseph Merdten, Peter Hitt, Joseph Counts, ——— Wayman, ——— Handbach. The names of these colonists are preserved in a letter written in 1814 by the Rev. James Kemper (1753-1834), of Cincinnati, Ohio, a Presbyterian clergyman of note in his day. His statements are fully corroborated by the deed and will books of Prince William, Fauquier and Culpeper counties, Virginia. The colonists came from Muesen and Siegen, situated in the principality of Nassau-Siegen, which is now a part of the Prussian province of Westphalia. Muesen has been an important iron centre since the year 1300. John Kemper, one of the original colonists at Germanna, and ancestor of the family of that name in Virginia, with many descendants in the West, was born at Muesen, July 8, 1692. He died in Virginia between the years 1754-'59. He was married in 1715 or 1716 to Ellsbeth (Alce) Otterbach, born in Siegen, Germany, May, 1689,

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  • Some Who Led, Front cover

    Some Who Led — Or — Fathers in
    the Church of the Brethren Who Have Passed Over

    Front cover — Some Who Led [Click for larger image]Front cover

    SOMEWHO LED Or Fathers in the Church of the Brethren Who Have Passed Over WRITTEN and COMPILED By D. L. Miller and Galen B. Royer “Lives of great men all remind us We can make our lives sublime, And departing, leave behind us Footprints in the sands of time.” BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE Elgin, Ill. 1912

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