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Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 127

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 127 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 127

    time a considerable number of people assembled, to whom I preached. After the sermon I baptized the child of a Hollander. We stayed over night with Matthias Schaub. His wife told us that we were always welcome in their house. We should always come to them whenever we came into that district. Towards evening a man from another district, Adam Mueller,* passed. I told him that I would like to come to his house and preach there. He asked me if I were sent by God. I answered, yes. He said, if I were sent by God I would be welcome, but he said, there are at present so many kinds of people, that often one does not know where they come from. I requested him to notify his neighbors that I would preach on the 5th, which he did. On December 4th, we left Schaub's house, commending the whole family to God. We traveled through the rain across the South Shenandoah to Adam Mueller, who received us with much love. We stayed over night with him. On December 5th, I preached at Adam Mueller's house on John 7: "Whosoever thirsteth let him come to the water and drink." A number of thirsty souls were present. Especially Adam Mueller took in every word and after the sermon declared himself well pleased. In the afternoon we traveled a short distance, staying over night with a Swiss.† The conversation * Probably Jacob Baer, Sr., a native of Zurich, Switzerland, who located on the Shenandoah in 1740, not far from Adam Miller, and was the ancestor of the Bear Family of East and West Rockingham. His two sons, JaCOb, Jr., and John, married, respectively Anna Barbara and Elizabeth Miller, daughters of Adam Miller. Jacob Baer, Sr., was either a Lutheran or German Reformed in his religious faith, and evidently not disposed to be tolerant of the Moravians. † Adam Miller, a native of "S~hresoin," Germany, who settled on the Shenandoah in 1726, near the present village of Elkton, Rockingham county, Virginia, and was the first white settler in the Valley of Virginia of whom there is record evidence. In religion he was a Lutheran. "Old Peter's Church," as it is locally known, but probably correctly St. Peter's, stands about six miles north of Adam Miller's permanent place of residence, and he is believed to be buried there. Rev. I. Conder, of McGaheysville, Va., states in a recent letter, that the records of this church (now lost) showed that the present structure was dedicated in June, 1777. For a full account of Adam Miller, and his settling in Virginia, see the July number, 1902 of this Magazine.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 392

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 392 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 392

    to Bethlehem, but he was now about to wed, and was married eight days later to a woman from "Purisburg." I also visited Mr. "Zibele" [Zubly],* who loves us, especially Bro. Boehler. As he intends to visit Pennsylvania within a few months, he will also come to Bethlehem. On Sunday, the 26th, I heard the Reformed minister preach in his church. He represented to his hearers the eternal punishmient of hell and that none could be saved from it, according to the words: "Thou shalt by no means come out thence, till thou hast paid the uttermost farthing." [Matt. 5: 26.] On February 4th, I went with Bro. Henry [Beck] by water to Ebenezer. We stayed three miles on this side with one of the Salzburgers over night. He is a hearty and dear man. On the 5th, I visited Dr. Tillow at Ebenezer. He is not satisfied with Bolzius, saying his people were not directed by him to the Saviour, but merely to virtues. However, he himself is a peculiar saint. We also visited the shoemaker, Reck. On Sunday, the 9th, I went to the white "Ploff," to bid the people farewell. Then I returned again to the city and held services in the evening. After them, a Hollander, Bekew, who attended our meetings frequently and who preaches occasionally in French, told me that he had derived great benefit from my sermons. He remembered all of last Sunday's sermon, and would preach it on the following Sunday in Georgia, in the French language. Captain Granid also came to me to bid me farewell. On the 15th, we bade a hearty farewell to our dear friends, Brownfield and Beck. They accompanied us to the sloop, and as the wind was favorable, we left Savannah. There were on * This was evidently David Zubly. Born January 2, 1700, at St Gall, Switzerland. Emigrated in September, 1736, with a colony of 250 persons, led by Rev. Mr. Zuberbuehler. Reached Purysburg, S C., in February, 1737. His son, John Joachim Zubly, educated in Switzerland, followed his father in 1744. The younger Zubly was for many years the most prominent Reformed minister in the South. In September, 1775, he was elected as a member of Continental Congress. Being a strong royalist, he was compelled to resign. Died August 2 , 1781. Good, History of the Reformed Church in the United States, pp. 256-261. Dubbs, The Reformed Church in Pennsytvania, pp. 202-219.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 229

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 229 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 229

    V. MISSINOTTY [MASSANUTTON]. It lies on the South Branch of the "Chanador," in the center, between the so-called "Missinotty" mountains and the Blue Ridge. It is a narrow. small and oblong district, which can easily be viewed in its entirety frum the mountains.* Many Germans live there. Most of them are "Mennisten" [Mennonites], who are in a bad condition.† Nearly all religious earnestness and zeal is extinguished among them. Besides them, a few church people live there, partly Lutheran, partly Refurmed. The Rev. Mr. Klug visits them occasionally. It is, so to say, one of his branch congregations [preaching stations]. He preaches and administers also the Lord's Supper to them. They do not want to hear the preaching of the brethren at this place. A man lives there by the name of Matthias Selzer, the son-in-law of Jacob Beyerly, of Lancaster. This man is highly respected in the whole region, because he is rich and often helps the people in their need. He has considerable influence among them, but he is a bitter enemy of the brethren. As a result, all the others are not just our friends. VI. THE UPPER GERMANS.‡ They live behind [east of] the Blue mountains, about thirty miles from "Missinotty," in a straight line, otherwise it may be *This statement clearly implies that the entire section of country now known as the Page Valley was originally known as Massanutton, and that the term is not to be understood as meaning a single settlement in one particular neighborhood. This fact may be of value in future discussions as to the exact location of the first white settlement in the Valley of Virginia. † The Mennonites are followers of Menno Simons (149--1559). They are a somewhat primitive people in their manners and customs, being non-combatants and abstaining almost entirely from participation in public affairs. While not numerous, congregations of this denomination are still to be found in Rockingham, Shenandoah and Page. ‡ This settlement was composed of German Lutherans, the second colony to locate at or near Germanna. They came in 1717 and consisted of twenty families numbering about eighty persons. The third colony came at some time between 1717 and 1720 and numbered forty families. These colonists removed from Germanna prior to the year 1724 and

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