Wednesday, 09 October 2013 22:02

The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 122

Written by  A. Wayne Webb
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The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 122 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 122

On November 13th, we started early. A German woman gave us a piece of bread and cheese for the way. A man who traveled our way to-day was of much assistance to us, as we had no house for twenty miles. Moreover, the forest was very dense, and it was difficult to find the way. To-day we came to the source of the South Fork* and, although we had to cross the water more than thirty times. (the people had urgently warned us not to take this road as we had no horse), yet the Lamb helped us safely through all difficulties. In the evening we lodged in an English cabin (thus they call the English houses there). It was quite cold. But the bear skins upon which we rested and the fire before us which kept us warm, rendered us good services. We had yet a piece of bread left, and as the people had none, we divided it with them. They gave us some of their bear meat, which can be found in every house in this district. On November 14th. we went on our way with a happy feeling. We had to wade through the water frequently. We stayed with a Welshman over night, but he did not trust us very much. We engaged him to take us through the river with his horse, because it is quite large; it is called "Kauh Pastert."† On November 15th, we traveled in the company of a Welshman, George Luys; he took us twelve times through the river [Clover Creek, Highland County]. Traveling was difficult to-day, for we had to cross rather high mountains, and, moreover it rained. Night overtook us before we reached a house and had passed through the water. At last we could no longer see the way and had to stay wht!re we were. Fortunately. we found a little hut, in which no one was at home. Here we stayed. thanking God for the shelter. We made fire, and after drying our clothes we * The South Fork of the South Branch rises in the extreme southern portion of Pendleton county, West Virginia. † Cow Pasture River. The missionaries were then within the limits of the present county of Highland. and probably reached the James River in the vicinity of Clifton Forge. From there the missionaries seem to have followed the road to Fincastle, Botetourt county, to Salem, Roanoke county, to Christiansburg, Montgomery county, and finally to the neighborhood of Newbern, in Pulaski county.

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