Wednesday, 09 October 2013 22:02

The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 130

Written by  A. Wayne Webb
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The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 130 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 130

mueller had fallen into the Cedar Creek and had become wet, he had an opportunity at Frey's to dry himself. On Sunday, December 10th, we hastened early to the old Mr. Funk, where we had appointed a sermon. When we arrived we found a good number of people, to whom I preached of the Saviour. After the sermon one of the sons told us that yesterday a man had come to them, having traveled fourteen miles, to ask them not to permit us to preach. But the son said that the request came too late, as the sermon had already been appointed. He was therefore compelled to return without gaining his end. The people in the house where we preached were very kind to us. We took leave of old Mr. Funk and his four sons, one of whom is a captain, and traveled a few miles, staying over night with a Mennonite. But as he was under the influence of whiskey, we could not speak of anything sensible to him. On December 11th, we visited the old Jost Hayd.* However, we did not stay long with him, but continued our journey to Fredericktown, in "Obeken."† where we called on a German shoemaker. Then we traveled ten miles further to an Englishman with whom we stayed over night, On December 12th, we started two hours before day break, because we could not rest well during the night. In the afternoon we came to the "Patomack," where the ferryman [at Watkins' Ferry] took us over. He asked us to send him one of our books from which he could learn our teaching. This * Joist Hite, the pioneer settler of the lower Valley, and the most enterprising of all the German settlers in that section. He was one of the first justices of Orange county, in 1734, which then embraced the present county of Frederick within its limits. For a full account of him and his family, see the April number, 1903, of the West Virginia Historical Magazine.† Fredericktown is the old town of Winchester; see journal of Rev. Michael Schlatter, in Life of Rev. Michael Schlatter, by Dr. H. Harbaugh, Philadelphia, 1857, p. 173; note 2. "Opequon" is now the name of a little town near Winchester. It seems to have been at that time the name of the whole district in which Winchester is situated.

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