Wednesday, 09 October 2013 22:02

The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 231

Written by  A. Wayne Webb
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The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 231 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 231

An awakened shoemaker lives there, named Philip, who ought to be visited. Besides him, there is also a man, named Casper, an unmarried man and a weaver. He lives with one named Jaeger.* This man is also concerned about his salvation. The Rev. Mr. Klug sends his greetings to Bro. Joseph [Spangenberg], because he learned to know and love him on his arrival in Philadelphia, about ten years ago. VII. THE GREAT FORK OF THE RIPPEHANNING [RAPPAHANNOCK.†] It is situated about twenty-six miles from the Upper Germans towards the "Potomik." Three German families live there. * This was probably Nicholas Yager, a native of Wickersbach in Hesse (?) Germany, who was naturalized by Governor Spotswood July 13, 1722. He was then a resident of Spotsylvania county, Virginia. His son Adam was naturalized in 1730 by Governor Gooch. It is stated that he was born in Fulkenston, near Dusseldorf, in the duchy of Neuberg. See the Garr Genealogy, by John C. Garr, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1894. The descendants of Nicholas Yager are still to be found in Madison and adjoining counties of Virginia. † This was Germanna, founded in 1714, by Governor Spotswood. The first colonists consisted of twelve German Reformed families, who arrived in Virginia in the month of April, 1714. They came upon the solicitation of Baron de Graffenried to establish and operate for Governor Spotswood the iron works which they built about ten miles northwest of Fredericksburg. Their names were John Kemper, Jacob Holtzclaw, John and Herman Fishback, John Henry Hoffman, Herman Otterbach, Tillman Weaver, John Joseph Merdten, Peter Hitt, Joseph Counts, ——— Wayman, ——— Handbach. The names of these colonists are preserved in a letter written in 1814 by the Rev. James Kemper (1753-1834), of Cincinnati, Ohio, a Presbyterian clergyman of note in his day. His statements are fully corroborated by the deed and will books of Prince William, Fauquier and Culpeper counties, Virginia. The colonists came from Muesen and Siegen, situated in the principality of Nassau-Siegen, which is now a part of the Prussian province of Westphalia. Muesen has been an important iron centre since the year 1300. John Kemper, one of the original colonists at Germanna, and ancestor of the family of that name in Virginia, with many descendants in the West, was born at Muesen, July 8, 1692. He died in Virginia between the years 1754-'59. He was married in 1715 or 1716 to Ellsbeth (Alce) Otterbach, born in Siegen, Germany, May, 1689,

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