Wednesday, 09 October 2013 22:02

The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 381

Written by  A. Wayne Webb
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The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 381 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 381

lodged in an English house, where the people received us willingly, because they had also lived in Pennsylvania. On December 2nd, we went fifteen miles without finding a house. We then came to the large "Ronok" [Roanoke] River at Iden's Ferry, which is the boundary between Carolina and Virginia. We went twenty miles farther and stayed with English people. They said that they had not heard a sermon for several months. On December 3rd, I visited a German, who lives here among English people. His name is Zolikoffer, a Swiss.* He received us very kindly and showed us much love. He related to us much of his life; that he had been an officer in the army and had had much money. Then he had traveled to America out of curiosity. When he returned to Europe, he was taken before the King and the princes to describe to them the conditions in America. Finally he had again come back to America and had stayed here. His story prevented me from telling him something about the Saviour. On the 4th, we came, towards ten o'clock, to a large creek, called Stony Creek. It seemed to be dangerous to pass through, but we risked it and waded across safely. Afterwards we did not find a house for eleven miles. Towards evening we found one, where we lodged. On the 5th, we were taken across the " Duerr " [Tar] River. We passed many swamps. The way was difficult to find. To-wards evening we were rowed across the "Cotendne " [Contentnea] River. We had still two miles to the nearest house, but got into a Carolinian swamp, with so much water and mud in it that nobody passes through on foot, but only on horseback. Although I called loudly for help, when I heard a dog bark, * A few years prior to 1738, Colonel William Byrd, of Westover, endeavored to locate a colony of Swiss on the Roanoke river. The venture, however, proved a failure. In 1738, Colonel Byrd published a work entitled Meu-Gefundnes Eden in Virginia [New-Found Eden in Virginia]. It was printed at St. Gall, in Switzerland, and its purpose was to induce Swiss and German immigrants to settle in Virginia, especially in the Roanoke Valley. For the time being, Colonel Byrd became a German and his name appears as Wilhelm Vogel. This work is rare. A copy is to be found in John Carter Brown Library, Providence, R. I.

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