Photograph of Eld. Samuel Murray [Click for larger image]Samuel Murray

April 1, 1806—March 31, 1906.

Born in a log cabin in Huntingdon County, Pa.  Son of John Murray and wife, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Wellbaum.   In his childhood the wolf, panther and bear menaced the family more or less.  When six, the family traveling by wagon to Pittsburgh, and then down the Ohio in boat, made its way to a settlement about nine miles west of Dayton.  Here forty acres of timber land were bought for $60, a log cabin erected, and the father went out to work at day’s labor to make a living.  When Samuel was twelve the father died, leaving in great poverty the widowed mother with a large family of children.  The older son leaving home to do for himself, the responsibility of helping mother care for the little ones fell upon Samuel.  He remained faithful to his charge until twenty–one, when he started out for himself also.  Taking up the trade of carpentry and mill-wright he hired the first year at $5 per month, the second at $10 and the third at $15, with the privilege of going to school three months of each year.  Thus in six years he enjoyed eighteen months’ schooling.

A Short Autobiography of Elder Samuel Murray: A Few Incidence and Facts of My First Work in the Ministry in Indiana. Also a Few Facts of My More General Work in the Ministry.

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Autobiography of Elder Samuel Muray. At the request of many friends, and for the benefit of future generations of our family, I write these few facts concerning my life and my ancestors. Our family stock is Scotch-irish; My grandfather, Daniel Murray, came to this country as a British soldier during the Revolutionary war. At some time during that war he escaped from the British service and joined the American army. At the close of the war he settled in Pennsylvania or New Jersey. He had four sons and one daughter. The daughter, Catharine (or aunt Katie as I knew her,) married a man by the name of Taylor. They had one son and one daughter. The union proved unfortunate, for they separated; aunt Katie and her husband lived for some time with my mother in Ohio. The daughter married Daniel Martin. The son also came from Penn. to Ohio, married and lived in the northern part of the state. I remember him because of a very remarkable occurrance, that of a quadruple birth by his wife. She gave birth to four well developed children three of which lived. Grandfather lived to be quite old and for some time lived with my mother. He used to knit stockings for sale; he died a poor man. He probably made no profession of religion. I remember of hearing him at one time when he was quite old and childish, repeat that child’s prayer, “Now I lay me down to sleep.” He never tired of telling about the feats of physical strength and valor that he had performed. He was tall and evidently a very powerful man at his best. His four sons, were John, David, Thom­as, and Daniel. Uncle David, lived in Huntingdon Co. Pa., and had a large family of children. I remember the names of only two of his sons, Daniel, and Jacob, nearly the age of myself and my brother David. The last word we had from them

A Short Autobiography of Elder Samuel Murray: A Few Incidence and Facts of My First Work in the Ministry in Indiana. Also a Few Facts of My More General Work in the Ministry.

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Copyright 1896 Samuel Murray Mexico, Ind. Copyright 2007 A. Wayne Webb & Ronald Pancner Millville, NJ & Ft. Wayne, Ind.

A Short Autobiography of Elder Samuel Murray: A Few Incidence and Facts of My First Work in the Ministry in Indiana. Also a Few Facts of My More General Work in the Ministry.

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A Short AUTOBIOGRAPHY of elder SAMUEL MURRAY. A few incidence and facts of my first work in the ministry in indiana. also a few facts of my more general work in the ministry. WRITTEN BY SAMUEL MURRAY AT THE AGE OF NINETY. BENEDICTION. I do pray the Lord to bless every lawful effort that is, and that can be made for the prosperity and advancement of God’s Kingsom here on Earth. Amen. SAMUEL MURRAY Price 25 cts.

Some Who Led — Or — Fathers in
the Church of the Brethren Who Have Passed Over

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Miller, David Alfred, 205 Miller, Robert Henry, 139 Mohler, Samuel S, 167 Moomaw, Benjamin Franklin, 90 Murray, Samual, 63 Naas, Johannes, 13 Nead, Peter, 38 Oller, Jacob F 136 Parker, Isaac Dillon, 198 Price, Isaac, 57 Puterbaugh, Amsey Hascall, 202 Quinter, James, 97 Saur, Christopher, 19 Sayler, Daniel P, 83 Snyder, Jacob S, 110 Stauffer, Daniel F, 183 Stoner, Ephraim, 173 Sturgis, Daniel B, 79 Thomas, Daniel, 128 Thomas, Jacob, 35 Trostle, Jacob D, 144 Umstad, John, 50 Vaniman, Albert, 216 Vaniman, Daniel, 175 Wine, Jacob, 73 Wine, Joseph, 134 Wise, John, 131 Wolfe, George, 31 Zigler, Samuel, 103 Zollers, George D, 186 Zuck, Jacob Martin, 194

Some Who Led — Or — Fathers in
the Church of the Brethren Who Have Passed Over

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CONTENTS Anthony, William A., 208Arnold, Charles Edward, 220Balsbaugh, Christian Hervey, 157 Becker, Peter, 16 Bomberger, Christian, 48 Bowman, John A., 87 Bowman, Joseph B., 171 Bowman, George C., 164 Bowman, Madison, 119 Cassel, Abraham Harley, 121 Ebersole, John P., 54 Eby, Enoch, 153 Fike, Samuel A., 125 Forney, John, 94 Garst, Henry, 113 Gibson, Isham, 60 Gish, James Rufus, 147 Hamilton, Heil, 76 Hertzler, William, 151 Holsinger, George Blackburn, 212 Hoover, Samuel W., 179 Hope, Christian, 190 Keyser, Peter, 27 Kline, John, 44 Kurtz, Henry, 41 Lahman, Joseph Christian, 161 Long, David, 116 Long, Isaac, 107 Mack, Alexander, Jr., 23 Mack, Alexander, Sr., 9 Major, Mrs. Sarah Righter, 70 Metzger, John, 66

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tory of the “Tunkers,” by Elder R. H. Holsinger, in the “Life of Elder James Quinter,” by Mary N. Quinter, and in the life of Elder R. H. Miller, by Elder Otho Wenger. To these authors and sources we acknowledge our indebtedness. To no one man does the church owe a greater debt of gratitude than is due Brother Abram H. Cassel for his efforts in collecting and preserving the records of the early church fathers. He saved from oblivion and gave us the records from which oru church historians draw their facts. We often hear the names of men who have acted well their part in life, and have departed, quoted in press and from pulpit and held up as examples worthy of imitation. It is our hope that such examples may here be found and held up as worthy of imitation, of high and noble lives that will incite others to make the best of their God–given opportunities in the world. D. L. Miller, Galen B. Royer.

Some Who Led — Or — Fathers in
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PREFACE For a quarter of a century the senior author has been collecting photographs of the ministers of the Church of the Brethren with the hope that some day they might be of use. From Brother George W. Lentz, of Kansas City, Mo., came the suggestion of the use now made of some of them in these pages. No attempt has been made to give lengthy details of the lives herewith presented to our readers. That task is left to others, who will here find the main facts in the lives of the fathers. It is the hope of the authors that this series of short biographies will be helpful to those who read, in provoking them to good work. The plea of human limitation is entered. We have written of the good that men have accomplished in the world, and have had in mind things that are true, honest, just, pure, lovely and of good report, with virtue and praise. All men have their weaknesses. Human perfection is not absolute. The only Man who ever lived in this world and never made a mistake and was without sin was our Lord Jesus Christ. We can only approximate the Perfect Ideal. The work has been a labor of love fom the beginning, and has been lightened by the helpful suggestion, the ample encouragement and the valuable assistance given us freely and cheerfully in collecting data for the work. Without such aid the book would have been an impossibility. To our brethren and sisters who assisted us we express our indebtedness and hearty thanks. Credit so far as possible has been given in the book to those who so kindly assisted in sending data and facts concerning those of whom we have written. We have also found information in old and almost forgotten almanacs, in the issues of our church newspapers, in the Minutes of Annual Conferences, in the histories of our church by Brethren Brumbaugh and Falkenstein, in the his-

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lect it is buried beyond recovery. We should never be content until we know it as fully as research and study make it possible for it to be known. I have long been convinced that there is much yet to be learned and recorded. Biography is history teaching by example. At the heart of a great cause is ever the heart of a great man. To know the cause one must know its central spirit. To the student these are the concrete expressions of great movements. Just as one finds back of all this wide, wonderful, beautiful world the personal God who made it and directs it, so one finds back of great religious move ments virile leaders whose thoughts and acts are the best explanation of the transforming power of the cause they espoused. In the Church of the Brethren it is peculiary true that we had great leaders—men whose towering leadership is of commanding influence to the day. That God should have given us leaders so great is cause for gratitude. That we shoudl known them not is cause for merited reproach. That their names and their deeds shold at last be concisely and carefully presented to us is cause for thankfulness. We cannot add to their glory. But we can profit by their high spiritual devotion. They do not need us, but forever we need them. Marshals of God, they were, and ours is the high privilege of following where the led. It is forunate that the record of their lives is here set forth by sympathetic and devoted follower of the same common Father. It is most fortunate that Brethren Miller and Royer should have been led of God to present these pioneer worthies to us before the dust of the centuries should have obliterated their footsteps forever. Thanks to our beloved brethren in the faith they loved and lived, we can once more commune with sainted souls whose lives are benedictions and whose deeds are sacred legacies. That the reader of this valuable treatise will know more fully the meaning of the faith of the church is certain. That he will become a stauncher and steadier soldier of the cross is inevitable. That he mae with increasing fervor and hunility follow the Master of us all is my ardent prayer. M.G. Brumbaugh.

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the Church of the Brethren Who Have Passed Over

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INTRODUCTION How relentless is time! The events of moment in our generation are memories in the next, and forgotten in the third. We retain but a fragment of the notable achive– ments of our fathers. The workers have been so busy do– ing things that no time was left to record the things they did. Here and there, by accident more frequently than by design, signs and hints remain. These the patient student and the sympathetic friend may gather and weave into a fair– ly accurate record. This is the work of the historian. It is service of the greatest value. The Christian Church has not carefully considered the meaning of its own history. Many a deed and many a life have faded from the light of the present. This is greatly to be regreetted. We need all the teestimony of God’s grace and goodness that we can possibly gather. The faithful fol– lower of the Great Father should ever seek to know and to emulate the deeds and lives of the worthies who have gone on and whose example is rich in convincing power to those who now and hereafter follow us. The Church of the Brethren has lost much of the fine rec– ord its great leaders have set goldenly in the progress of Christian thought for two centuries. Perhaps the exodus from Europe, the change from the German to the Enlglish language, and the scattered life here in the colonies have combined to explain, in part at least, this loss. A few years ago it was impossible to ascertain the simple facts fo the origin of the church, its early struggles, its great leaders, its commanding place among the German–Americans of our colonial and early national life. This in part has been remedied. We now know somewhat in detail this splendid record of glorious service to God’s cause. We shall never know it in full. In the grave of neg–

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