Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 488 [Click for larger image]Page 488

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 487 [Click for larger image]Page 487

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 485 [Click for larger image]Page 485

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 484 [Click for larger image]Page 484

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

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Published in Volume XX — 1911
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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 135

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 135 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 135

    ning we came to the Misselim [Moselem, Berks Co.] mill and staved there over night. The people were rather friendly and more ready to serve us than at other times, when they were unwilling to keep the brethren over night. On the way we took along several articles of our baggage, which had to be taken from our wagon, because it was stalled and could not be moved. On October 9, we rose very early and continued our journey. Bro. Grube and Kalberland preceded us. A man met them who asked whether any one of us knew how to let blood, a poor servant being sick at Uly Hui's, who had heard of us and urgently requested us to come to him. We went to him, and Bro. Kalberland bled him, for which he was very thankful. At noon we came to Bro. Jacob Mueller's.3 He was not at home. His boy took us over the "Tulpehokke" [creek] in a canoe. It almost capsized, but our angels held it fast. We soon came to the Heidelberg school house and found our friends, the Muellers, well. They were glad to see and to entertain us once more. There were also several brethren present, who worked at the new meeting house. They were glad to greet us again. To-wards evening we came to our dear friends, Loesch,4 by whom (3). Dr. Hans Martin Kalberlahn, born in Norway, age 31 years, the physician. (4). Hans Peterson, born in Danish Holstein, age 28 years, a tailor. (5). Christopher Merkly, born in Germany, age 39 years, a baker. (6). Herman Loesch, born in Pennsylvania, age 27 years, a farmer. (7). Erich Ingebretsen, born in Norway, age 31 years, a carpenter. (8). Henrich Feldhausen, born in Holstein, age 38 years, a carpenter. (9). Johannes Lisher, a farmer. (10). Jacob Lung, born in Germany, age 40 years, a gardener. (11). Friederich Jacob Pfeil, born in Germany, age 42 years, a shoe-maker and tanner. (12). Jacob Beroth, born in Germany, age 28 years, a farmer. With these twelve, came the brethren Gottlob Koenigsderfer, also a minister, Nathanael Seidel ordained bishop in 1758, and Joseph Haberland. After a brief visit these three returned to Pennsylvania. 3 Jacob Mueller was a inember of the Moravian congregation in North Heidelberg Township, Berks Co., Pa. He lived one mile north of the Heidelberg schoolhouse, close to the Tulpehocken creek. Taken from Alphabetical Register of Moravians, a MS. in the Bethlehem archives. 4 George Loesch was a member of the Moravian ongregation at the Quittopahilla. He lived at Tulpehocken, eight miles northwest of the Hebron church. See Alphabetical Register in Bethlehem archives.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 278

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 278 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 278

    On Novenmber 12, we rose very early, and at three o'clock ate stewed pumpkin. Then we went again through thick and thin, often across steep hills, where we had to push our wagon with might and main. We avoided a large swamp, about a hundred feet wide, making a new way to the left across the mountain, which was a great help to us. We came to a creek, called Horse Pasture,7 which is somewhat larger than the "Manakis" [Monocacy]. It had been exceptionally high a few days before, but had fallen again. We here met one of the worst banks, of which the people had long told us, telling us that we would hardly be able to cross, but our picks and shovels served us well and we came across safely. Close to this creek is a new plantation. The people estimate the distance from this place to the Smith River as twelve miles. We drove four miles farther and ate dinner at Adam Loving's plantation. Here we bought ten bushels of corn. The people were very friendly to us. The man showed us the ford across the first branch of the Meho [Mayo] River, which is not much wider than the "Manakis" at Bethlehem. It has, however, such steep banks that we could hardiy cross in two hours. It is fortunate that the creeks have all subsided again since the last rain, otherwise we would be detained considerably. Three miles farther we came to the main branch of the Meho [Mayo] River, which is about as broad as the "Lecha" [Lehigh] at Gnadenhutten. The approach to the river was pretty good, but the exit was all the harder. We had to work till night, before we could make the opposite bank passable so that we could drive up. We passed the night here and as we had little wood we all lay down around the fire, and thus slept the last time in Virginia. We had traveled thirteen miles to-day. On November 13. we rose in the morning at three o'clock. It began to rain again but we started on our journey. We almost missed the way, turning too much to the right. At day-break we came to the boundary of Virginia and North Carolina. The road leads across a creek,8 two miles from our camp. Bro. 7 The Horse Pasture creek is in the extreme western part of Henry county. It empties into the N. Mayo river. 8 This creek is probably Crooked creek, which runs close to the boundary of Patrick county and North Carolina.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 138

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 138 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 138

    latter by Bro. Loesch. Thus three or four brethren will always be on guard at night. At midnight a drunken Irishman came to us and lay down at our fire, but he did not disturb our rest. Bro. Gottlob had hung his hammock between two trees and rested in it very well. On October 13, after eating some soup, we continued our journey. Bro. Grube and Loesch preceded us to the Susquehanna to Harrison's Ferry [Harrisburg]8 to find out how we could cross. Bro. Grube found an opportunity to send a letter with a trader to "Shomoko" [Shamokin]. The Susquehanna is very shallow,9 so that no ferry can cross. We resolved therefore to ford it. The brethren all mounted the wagon and the horses and thus we all passed over safely. The Susquehanna is one mile wide here. Bro. Beroth with his father joined us again. He brought a letter from Bro. Bader, who very much regretted his inability to come and by this letter bade us farewell. Two miles this side of [beyond]10 the Susquehanna we packed everything in our wagon that had been in Bro. Loesch's wagon, which was then sent back. The time had now come for Bro. Gottlob to bid us farewell. But he, like Bro. Haberland, concluded to go with us to North Carolina. We were all delighted with the prospect of so long enjoying the presence of our dear brother. Bro. Gottlob and Nathanael wrote several letters to Bethlehem and gave them to Bro. Merk to deliver. Thtis there returned with the wagon Bro. Merk, the little Joseph Mueller and G. Loesch. The latter wept very much when he took leave of his two brothers. Beroth's father, to whom it was a great pleasure to see the first caravan to Carolina, also bade us a hearty farewell and went back home. The distance from this point to York 8 The site of Harrisburg was settled by John Harris about 1726. Known as Harris's Ferry at least as early as 1753. Laid out as the town of Louisbourg in 1785, incorporated as the borough of Harrisburg in 1791, became state capital in 1812. 9 The fall of the year 1753 must have been an exceptionally dry season. This is indicated by the extreme shallowness of the Susquehanna and other rivers crossed by the Moravian pioneers. 10 The writer always uses the phrase "this side of" from his own point of view at the time being. In most instances, as in the present case, it would be more correct to use "beyond."

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