Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 488 [Click for larger image]Page 488

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 487 [Click for larger image]Page 487

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 485 [Click for larger image]Page 485

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 484 [Click for larger image]Page 484

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 483 [Click for larger image]Page 483

Published in Volume XX — 1911
Page 1 of 7

Recently Added

  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 389

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 389 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 389

    Mr. Bolzius. In it many lies were told about our Brethren and many wicked things were falsely reported about them. This letter, covering two sheets, was read by Bolzius to the people one afternoon, instead of a sermon, after having administered the holy communion in the forenoon. This has stirred up the people against us. On the 2nd, I visited Mr. Ade, a shoemaker, and later Michael Schweizer, to whom I delivered a letter from Bro. Hagen. In the evening Bro. Brownfield, together with Henry Beck* and John Bay, had their usual meeting, to which they also invited Bro. Hussey and myself. On the 3rd and 4th, I visited a number of people. On the 5th, being Christmas (i. e., December 25th, old style), I preached a German sermon in Savannah, in the house of the Brethren. A number of people came together, when they heard that a strange minister was there. In the afternoon but very few came. After the services a man spoke to me, who at one time intended to stab Bro. Hagen. His name is Bellico. But he is now converted and he requested me in his name to ask Bro. Hagen's forgiveness. On the 6th, as on Monday after Christmas, I preached to the Germans at the "White Ploff." I also visited an awakened man and friend, Berger. He asked me to visit him frequently, which I did. As a result he was deposed from his office as elder of the Reformed congregation, because, as the people said, he had fallen away from his religion. On the 7th, I returned again to Savannah, where I visited several Germans, among others Mr. Astherr. On the 12th, I preached in Savannah in the forenoon, and in settled at Ebenezer, twenty-four miles from Savannah. Other colonists followed soon afterwards. See P. A. Strobel, The Salzburgers and their Descendants. Baltim re, 1855. * Brownfield and Beck were among the first adherents of the Moravians in Savannah. Brownfield had come to Georgia from England in February, 1737, with General Oglethorpe. Beck had arrived in 1738, and was for a time a member of the "Whitefield Economy." Both left Georgia in 1745 and settled in Bethlehem. Both were later ordained deacons and died at Bethlehem. See Register of Moravians, pp. 73 f. and 77.

    Be the first to comment! Read 756 times
  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 390

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 390 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 390

    the afternoon at the "White Ploff," where several had agreed to stone me if I should undertake to preach. However, I paid no attention to them but went into the meeting house at the usual time. During the sermon they created considerable disturbance outside of the house, but I remained unmolested. After the sermon I visited Mr. Teus* and his wife. On the 16th, Mr. Barber, from the orphanage of Whitefield,† visited me. He invited me to come to the orphanage to visit him. On Sunday, the 19th, the minister from "Purisburg" administered the Lord's Supper to the Germans, at the court house [in Savannah]. The Germans of the white "Ploff," who liked me, came to the city to-day, with whom I held services in the afternoon. On the 21st, I traveled by water to Purisburg, spending the night with Mr. Ehrhard. On the next day I visited the Reformed minister there, named "Chiffeli."‡ He showed me his garden and plantation. When we returned to the house I asked him whether he would allow me to preach in his church. He said, * This is, perhaps, the German painter, Theus, who entertained Muhlenberg in Charlotte, S. C., from October 25, 1742, to November 12, 1742. See Muehlenberg's Autobiography, Allentown, 1881, pp. 115-117. According to Bernheim (History of the German Settlements and of the Lutheran Church in North and South Carotina, Philadelphia, 1872, p. 88), he was the brother of the Reformed minister, Christian Theus, who labored in Saxe Cotha, S. C., from 1739 to at least 1789. † The cornerstone of the Whitefield orphanage, at Savannah, was laid on March 25, 1740. When the building was completed, it received the name Bethesda. McClintock and Strong Cyclopædia, Vol. X, p. 983. ‡ Dalcho in his History of the P. E. Church in South Carolina, p. 386, mentions Rev. Henry Chiffelle as pastor in Purysburg. He was ordained by the Bishop of London, July 21, 1734. He is said to have come to South Carolina in 1744, and died in 1758. The date 1744 seems to be a misprint for 1734, because (1) this diary shows that he was already in South Carolina in January, 1744, his statements implying a long residence in this country. (2) Rev. Joseph Bugnion, his predecessor, died in 1734, and it is hardly likely that the S. P. G. should have left the congregation vacant ten years. (3) Rev. Chiffelle was ordained in 1734 for service in America, which implies his immediate departure for his field of labor. It is interesting to find him referred to as a Reformed minister in spite of his Episcopal ordination.

    Be the first to comment! Read 642 times
  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 152

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 152 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 152

    Then we had to climb hills again. When we reached the top we had a beautiful view before us and behind us. The Blue and the South Mountains here have an oval shape. The mountains were all covered with snow. The farther we went the more snow we had and the more difficult it was to drive. Two miles to the left was a plantation, where a few of the brethren drank milk. Nearby was a little creek. Then the way was up hill again. Within a mile and a half we came to another creek, not far from a plantation. Here is a good place to lodge, because there is good water and wood. A mile farther we had a miserable road, being very steep, so that we could hardly keep the wagon from rolling down the mountain. Thus we descended the mountain. After half a mile we came to a small creek, along which we drove for some distance up the valley. Then we ate dinner. One of the horses became sick, but we gave him some medicine, which took effect. After having traveled a mile and a half we crossed several bad hills, close to a fence, and came to Joseph Macdonell's house, who moved to this place two years ago from "Manakesie " [Monocacy] in Maryland. He was very kind and showed us the right way without our asking him. A quarter of a mile from his house are two roads, one to the right goes to the New River, but we took the one to the left. We came again to a little creek and five miles farther to our camping place. Towards evening we met an old man, who began a conversation with Bro. Nathanael. As we passed close to his fernce we offered to buy some of his turnips but he was kind enough to give us a good quantity for nothing. His name is Mueller. One of our horses took sick again and we bled him. On November 1, we started very early on our journey, but we had to bleed another horse. The change of the feed causes much of the sickness among our horses. After a mile and a half we found water, after half a mile a creek, and after another mile another creek. Close by was an old plantation and two roads. We took the one to the left. A quarter of a mile farther a road went up the mountain to the left. It was the road to Warrick. Then we came to a stone house, of which we had heard and where we had hoped to buy some provisions. But we could get little. The people estimate the distance to the "Runoke" as nine miles. The road became very narrow, so that we hardly knew

    Be the first to comment! Read 808 times