Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 488 [Click for larger image]Page 488

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 487 [Click for larger image]Page 487

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 485 [Click for larger image]Page 485

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 484 [Click for larger image]Page 484

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 483 [Click for larger image]Page 483

Published in Volume XX — 1911
Page 1 of 7

Recently Added

  • Claar Congregation, Flyleaf page (inside)

    A Brief History of Claar Congregation

    Flyleaf page (inside)' — Claar Congregation [Click for larger image]Flyleaf page (inside)'

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  • History – Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico & Louisiana, page 8

    Thirty-One Years of Organized Work in Oklahoma,
    Texas, New Mexico and Louisiana by
    Church of the Brethren from 1891 to 1922

    page 8 — History: Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico & Louisiana [Click for larger image] title=page 8

    Another phase of the church work in these states, is the prcatice of the ordinances by different individuals and how they are viewed by others. Some ordinances that were properly observed were viewed with interest and many were much benefitted and some of the spectators later were partIcipants. One young man who took his Testament and followed the ordinance of feet-washing, remarked, "It is there, that way." Later he was among the participants. One man said to me one day. When I used to live in Indiana I would attend your "Barbecues." (Referring to those communion occasions where we had two or three days meeting and furnished meals to all who came). Another place in the observance of the salutation, we were very closely watched and I learned of another body of religious enthusiasts who tried to observe that ordinance without regard to sex. That sort of observance caused troubles between husband and wife and in a few instances homes were broken up. They were called the "Kissing Bugs." Our observance of the ordinance was with some difficulty in that community. The ordinance of baptism is variously viewed and practiced. In a certain community where we had preached baptism as hard as we could, one friend who was not yet initiated into church fellowship, decided that the three dips were all right but he wanted it backward and his minister did it for him. These people who act as tho they could live above sin are closely watched and sometimes found to be like other well-meaning mortals. Sometimes they have been severely tested and didn't stand the test.

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 351

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 351 [Click for larger image]Page 351

    Wait on the Queen of Arts in her own bowers, Perfumed with all the fragrance of the earth From blooming shrubbery and radiant flowers; And hope with rapture wed life's calm and peaceful hours Oft as the spring wakes on the verdant year, And nature glows in fervid beauty dress'd, The loves and graces shall commingle here, To charm the queenly City of the West; Her stately youth with noble warmth impress'd Her graceful daughters, smiling as in May—Apollos these, and Hebes those confessed; Bloom in her warm and fertilizing ray, While round their happy sires the cherub infants play. So sings the Muse as she with fancy's eye, Scans, from imagination's lofty height, Thy radiant beaming day—where it doth lie In the deep future; glowing on the night From whose dark womb, empires unveil to light; Mantled and diademed and sceptered there Thou waitest but the advent of thy flight. When like a royal Queen, stately and fair, The City of the West ascends the regal chair. A PROPHECY,* BY RETURN JONATHAN MEIGS. Enough of tributary praise is paid To virtue living or to merit, dead. To happier themes the rural muse invites, To calmest pleasures and serene delights. To us, glad fancy brightest prospects shows; Rejoicing nature all around us glows; Here late the savage, hid in ambush, lay, Or roamed the uncultured valleys for his prey; Here frowned the forest with terrific shade; No cultured fields exposed the opening glade; How changed the scene! See nature clothed in smiles

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