Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

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Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

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Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

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Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

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Published in Volume XX — 1911

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Published in Volume XX — 1911

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 70

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 70 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 70

    rudely, called me a Zinzendorfian, threatened me with imprisonment, and referred to the travels and sermons of the Brethren in a very sarcastic manner. He said if I should get to the upper Germans they would soon take me by the neck, for he did not know what business I had among those people. In the first place we had been forbidden to travel around through the country, and then again they had such an excellent minister, that if the people were not converted by his sermons, they would certainly not be converted by my teaching. But soon afterwards he related of the excellent Lutheran minister that he got so drunk in his house that on his way home he lost his saddle, coat and everything else from the back of the horse.31 I was silent to all this, but prayed for the poor man that the Lord might open his eyes. On April 6-March 26, I started early. Matthias Selzer saddled two horses and took me not only across the South Branch of the "Chanador," but even five miles farther, so that I could not go astray. The regular road to the uipper Germans "is fifty miles, but across the mountain it is twenty miles nearer, hence I went straight across the mountain. It took me more than two hours to reach the top. The people there call this nmountain the "blue reach" [ridge]. When I was at the foot of the moun tain and also half way up it rained, but when I reached the top it snowed very fast. The path which leads across is covered with stones and trees, so that I had to stop frequently to think 31This was Rev. Mr. Klug, Lutheran minister of Hebron Church, in the present county of Madison, then Orange. The reader should bear in mind the customs and manners of the time, and pass a lenient judgment upon Mr. Klug. Bishop Meade, in his Old Churches, Ministers and Families of Virginia, cites many similar cases among the clergy of the Established Church, some of which are noted in Fiske's Old Virginia and Her Neighbors, Vol. II, pp. 262-263. 32 At the end of this diary see Orders of the County Court of Orange, naturalizing certain German Protestants, who were evidently members of Hebron Church, in the present county of Madison. The early deed and will books of Orange and Culpeper show the German family names of Utz, Hernsberger, Crisler, Crigler, Clore and others, who belonged to the same congregation. These people came with the second and third colonlies, which located at Germanna in 1717 and later.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 240

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 240 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 240

    On July 27th, they journeyed from this place to Messinutty* [Massanutton], where Germans of all kinds of denominations live—Mennonites, Lutherans, Separatists and Inspirationists.† Bro. Joseph spoke to some of them, but they are very bad people. It is a dead place where their testimony found no entrance.‡ On July 28, they crossed the South or Blue Ridge, which are the mountains opposite Bethlehem, extending continuously through Pennsylvania and Maryland. They found an awfully wretched road, and it was a neck-breaking undertaking to descend the mountains. Below the mountains is a strong settlement of German and English people. It is called the "Great Fork of the Rappehannock."§ A regular Lutheran congregation is there, whose pastor, Magister Klug, is a disciple of the * As the missionaries make no reference to crossing the Massanutton range of mountains on their journey to the Massanutton district, they evidently passed near the present site of Harrisonburg, Va., traveling around the Peaked Mountain, which is the southern end of the Massanutton range. † Inspirationists are the members of a sect which originated in Germany, among people who had separated from the State Church. Their main leaders were E. L. Gruber at Himbach, near Hanau, A. Gross in Frankfort, J. F. Rock at Himbach and E. C. Hochmann at Schwarzenau, near Berleburg. In 1716 they took the name "Truly Inspired." A number of them, under the leadership of Gruber, Gleim, Mackinet and others, emigrated to Pennsylvania, where they settled at Germantown. From here they spread to other settlements. Their name was derived from the fact that they claimed to receive direct divine communications through the inspiration of the Holy Ghost. See McClintock and Strong, Theological Cyclopedia, Vol. IV, p. 616. The term Separatists refers more generally to all who had separated themselves from the established State churches. tThe diaries of other missionaries, to be published later, show that the people pf this district were strongly prejudiced against the Moravians, which fact may in some degree account for the severe judgment passed upon them by Bishop Spangenberg. § This is an error. The Great Fork of the Rappahannock was the name applied by Gottschalk to the old settlement at Germanna. The Bishop is referring to the German Lutheran settlement in the present county of Madison, mentioned in a previous note.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), Title page

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), Title page [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), Title page

    THE VIRGINIA MAGAZINE OF HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. VOL. XI. OCTOBER, 1903. No.2. MORAVIAN DIARIES OF TRAVELS THROUGH VIRGINIA. Edited by Rev. WILLIAM J. HINKE and CHARLES E. KEMPER. [Rev. William J. Hinke, the translator of the diaries presented in this issue of the magazine, was born March 24th, 1871. at Dierdorf, Rhineprovince, Germany; attended the gymnasium at Elberfeld from 1880 to 1887, and came to America in November of the latter year. Graduated from Calvin College, Cleveland, Ohio, in 1890 and was instructor in Latin and Greek at that institution 1890-1892. Graduated from Ursinus Theological Seminary, Collegeville, Pennsylvania, in 1894, and spent a year in post-graduate work at Princeton Seminary. He is at present Assistant Pastor of Salem Reformed Church, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and holds the professorship of Old Testament Language and Literature in Ursinus Seminary. Mr. Hinke has contributed numerous historical articles to the "Reformed Church Messenger" and, "Reformed Church Record," and edited the "Goshenhoppen Church Record, 1731-1761, in the Perkiomen Region," and the "Neshaminy Church Record, 1710-1738," which appeared in the Journal of the Presbyterian Historica1 Society. He is also Editor-in-Chief of the "Minutes and Letters of the Reformed Coetus of Pennsylvania, 1747-1792,"

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