Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 488 [Click for larger image]Page 488

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 487 [Click for larger image]Page 487

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 485 [Click for larger image]Page 485

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 484 [Click for larger image]Page 484

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 483 [Click for larger image]Page 483

Published in Volume XX — 1911
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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 383

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 383 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 383

    house on John, 18:37. After the sermon Abr. Bossert made a great feast to all the persons present, at which many blessed discourses were held. They were all very happy, and expressed the wish to hear me preach every Sunday. They also related to me that three days ago two men from Philadelphia had been with them. They had told them that there was again a new religion in Pennsylvania, in which the people were given a certain potion to drink, after which they would adhere to them. Not long ago a ship-load of people from Switzerland had arrived, who had been rich and respectable people, but as soon as they had taken this potion, they had gone over with all their possessions to the new religion.* After all this the people returned to their homes, thanking me very much and giving me six pounds, Carolina money, for the journey. On the day before, the elder, who had been much moved by the sermon, had given me three pounds out of the church treasury, and twenty shillings out of his own pocket. On December 10th, early, Abr. Bossert gave us as many victuals as we could carry. We were well satisfied with them, as few houses are met with on the way. He accompanied us several miles. Then we came to Michael Miller, who had kindly invited us yesterday. He is a very proud man. He at once prepared a fine meal and asked for his friends in Pennsylvania. We learned that he is a brother-in-law of our Frantz Bluhm. After one hour we continued our journey. In the afternoon we crossed the "Neu" [New] River, and in the evening we lodged with William Stephen, who had been in Georgia recently, and gave us a thorough description of the way. We heard here wolves and many wild animals at night. On December 11th, we came so near to the ocean that we could hear the roaring of the waves. In thirty-five miles we had only two houses. Bro. Hussey was rather weak to-day, because he was sick. He had pain in his foot and limped. We stayed in an English inn, kept by George Bishop. On December 12th, we traveled thirty miles, but found only one house. In the evening we came to the city of Williams- * This is a sample of the foolish stories circulated at that time about the Moravians.

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 483

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 483 [Click for larger image]Page 483

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 378

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 378 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 378

    district thought of him. They answered: "Not very much." Rev. Mr. Rieger had said that he was a good Evangelical minister, who did not try to draw any one away from his religion, and that he preached the word pure and undefiled to all who wanted to hear him. They also told me that a man by the name of Matthew Hoffmann lives at Bethlehem, who had written several letters to his brother, living ten miles from there.* He had brought the letters to him [the schoolmaster] to read them to him, because he feared that his brother had fallen away froin the true religion. The schoolmaster had then read the letters, but liked them very well. In the evening I visited an elder, at whose place all his neighbors again came together, when they heard that I was there. I spoke to them of the death of the Lamb. On Monday, the 25th, before we left, five women came, who showed us much kindness. We then took leave, being very grateful. The schoolmaster, "Holzkloh," accompanied us part of the way, and gave me a letter to a Reformed elder in Carolina, to whom he recommended me most heartily. Taking leave he asked us urgently to come again and stay several weeks. We had nothing but rain all day, and passed a creek, which was dangerous becatise of its rocks and holes. A man happened to come along, who took us over. Shortly before we had already passed a river, called "Repehennik" [Rappahannock], in a canoe. In the evening we came to a German innkeeper, Kuefer Stopfel,† called Dutch Cooper. After a while, when he heard that I was a minister, he told of an English minister‡ living in the county, who receives 16,000 pounds of tobacco as his of the Church of the United Brethren, by L. T. Reichel, Nazareth, 1888, pp. 62-68. * This statement shows that the second Reformed colony, settled at the Little Fork of the Rappahannock, and visited by Gottschalk in 1748 (see Virginia Magazine, Vol. XI, p. 232), was already in existence in 1743. † As the Anglicised name shows, the correct name of this innkeeper must have been Christopher Kuefer. ‡ This was Rev. John Thompson (see this magazine, Vol. XI, p. 232). The German minister was Rev. George Samuel Klug (see this magazine, Vol. XI, pp: 230 and 240, f).

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