Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 482 [Click for larger image]Page 482

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 481 [Click for larger image]Page 481

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 480 [Click for larger image]Page 480

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 479 [Click for larger image]Page 479

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 478 [Click for larger image]Page 478

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 477 [Click for larger image]Page 477

minded boys must pass. The "experience" is not unique but universal, the awakening of the expanding soul to the mysteries of an unseen but nevertheless a real world; the working of an irresistible spirit upon the troubled waters of a soul seeking to reconcile the natural inherent religion with the dogmatic or conventional creed of the church. This reconciliation must be solved by each youth in his own way, influenced or aided by his own peculiar environment. How the Buckeye Boy wrought out his great problem and found his permanent foothold in a natural faith is told with unaffected candor and reverential delicacy. This review of youthful times — the backward look of a half a century or more — is a rare and precious playspell in the later days of a mature and fruitful literary life POEMS ON OHIO. We believe it was Isaac Walton in his "Complete Angler" who spoke of "old fashioned poetry, but choicely good." There are of course poets and poets, and good, bad and indifferent. The little volume entitled "Poems on Ohio," collected and annotated by Professor C. L. Martzolff, and published by the Ohio State Archæological and Historical Society offers a variety ill degree of excellency in the quality of the effusions by the rhyming writers who have taken Ohio, localities therein and historical incidents and characters connected therewith, as their subjects. Some of these poems are by authors whose names are fixed in the literary firmament; others of these poems will be classed by the critics as mere rhyming productions, a few verging towards the class designated as doggerel, but all are interesting and from some point of view deserving of preservation. They number in this volume some hundred and thirty and reflect the sentiment and culture of the early pioneer days. It was well worth while for Prof. Martzolff to gather up these stray poems and put them in permanent form. The editor's annotations are of great value for they embrace brief biographical notices of the authors, whose names, many of them at least, would otherwise have been lost in the shades of oblivion. Mr. Martzolff is well qualified for his part in the publication, for he has been for years a zealous student of Ohio history and his many valuable articles in the volumes of the Ohio State Archæological and Historical Society have made for him a recognized place in the literature of the history of Ohio. This volume should be in every public library in the State and to the teachers it will be of great use on occasions commemorative of historic events and in exercises o f a patriotic nature. The volume retails for $1.00 and is sold by the Society publishing it.

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 476 [Click for larger image]Page 476

has done a unique and stupendous service in the field of western historic lore. These volumes will soon be beyond the reach of the purchaser as but one thousand copies were printed — "from type and the type destroyed" — say the publishers. Scarcity will therefore soon add to the value of the work. A BUCKEYE BOYHOOD. A very delightful and entertaining little volume of two hundred pages, recently published by The Robert Clarke Company, Cincinnati, is “A Buckeye Boyhood," by William Henry Venable. The mention of the author's name is assurance of the literary excellence of the story and the charming nature of the narrative, Mr. Venable early won high place among the Ohio men of letters by his “Beginnings of Literary Culture in the Ohio Valley," now a classic in Ohioana. His numerous other books of poetry, history, fiction and essay bespeak the range of his intellectual wealth and the versatility of his talent, thought and study. A dozen or more volumes on various themes, all gems in their way, attest the popular place Mr. Venable has attained among the readers not only of Ohio but the country at large. This last volume is a "veiled autobiography" — a renaissance of the life and times of the author's boyhood; much of the recital being his own personal experience. The story is given in a simple, lucid style of "everyday" English — rendering the pages fascinating alike to young and old. In the rush and whirl of our present day life the literature that seems most in demand is that either of the purely in forming kind — the knowledge more or less heavy or technical that men and women seek for practical purposes or the highly imaginative or sensational class that stimulates the emotions and is read, much as narcotics and intoxicants are taken, to deaden for the moment the oppressions and cares of an overwrought nervous existence. The Buckeye Boyhood is a reversion — evidently delightful to the author and hence also to the reader — to the simple rural life of a generation or two ago; the struggle on the farm, for a plain living, with its attendant enjoyment of the freedom and beauties of nature; the toil arduous but simple, and unhampered by the exactions and high pressure of the "get there" ambitions and superfluous luxuries. The fields and woods and streams and hills and dales were the boy's arena — the country school with its elemental studies, the glimpses of the village and city life and the wider range of vision they opened for the lad; his books and reading and his amusements; all these are set forth by the pen of Mr. Venable as with the brush of a master upon the canvas of memory by an artist not an impressionist but a realist. The chapter on "religious experience" is especially readable as it typifies the crucial trial through which nearly all thoughtful and serious

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 474 [Click for larger image]Page 474

erous, similar testimonials in other regions covered by the glacial flow? But this question is not for us to discuss. We leave the debate to the learned gentlemen of the scientific arena. Prof. Wright's book is not a "dry as dust" volume of technical lore. It is written in a clear, simple, entertaining style; holds the reader, young and old, the collegiate and one only endowed with "common sense," with equal intent. It is at once a most successful contribution to the scientific and popular lore concerning the period, when the ice man of the north went forth and gripped with his frigid fingers a large portion of the earth. It was a wonderful conquest and Prof. Wright tells the story in a manner at once charming and scholarly. The work is printed in clear, legible type and is embellished with copious illustrations and maps. THE WILDERNESS TRAIL. One of the most valuable contributions to the historical literature of the West, issued in recent years, is one entitled "The Wilderness Trail," or "The Ventures and Adventures of the Pennsylvania Traders on the Allegheny Path," with some annals of the "Old West, and the Records of Some Strong Men and Some Bad Ones." The work, published by G. P. Putnam's Sons, New York, is in two volumes of four hundred pages each. There are numerous pictures and portraits, a few of the latter from rare originals, never before reproduced; there are also many maps, reduced replicas, from the originals in the government archives. The author of this work is Mr. Charles A. Hanna, whose extensive account of "The Scotch-Irish" published some years ago, gave the author a most favorable introduction to the public. Mr. Hanna is an Ohio man, having been born and raised in Harrison county, though for many years he has been a resident of New York City. The work deserves a more extended and detailed review than our space will permit. It has met with a most complimentary reception at the hands of the literary and historical critics. Mr. Hanna has put forth a monumental production. Possessed of an intense interest in the early history of the great west, especially the Ohio Valley, endowed with the temperament and taste of a man of letters, Mr. Hanna has with almost overzealous application to details and an indefatigible devotion to accuracy accumulated a well nigh overwhelming fund of historical matter. Indeed Mr. Hanna's volumes present an amplitude of facts that almost bewilder the reader. But the data acquired through great labor and patience has been secured from authoritative sources and has the inestimable value of accuracy. The sources of in formation are freely stated and original documents, archives, inaccessible to the ordinary writer, and rare authorities are drawn upon and much historical in formation, hitherto un-

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 471 [Click for larger image]Page 471

THE ICE AGE IN NORTH AMERICA. The Bibliotheca Sacra Company, Oberlin, Ohio, has recently issued a fifth and revised edition of " The Ice Age in North America, and Its Bearings Upon the Antiquity of Man." The author is Professor G. Frederick Wright, President of the Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society. No writer could be better qualified for such a scholarly and informing work. Professor Wright has been a most conscientious and broad student of theology, and the language and literature of the Old and New Testaments. For some ten years he was professor in Oberlin College, on the harmony of science and religion. Professor Wright is also an accomplished scholar in geology and relative natural sciences. He was assistant on the Pennsylvania and United States Geological Surveys and is the author of several works of a geological character, bearing upon the formation of the earth's surface, not only in America but Europe and Asia, which countries he has visited at length in order to procure his material at first hand. Especially have his studies been directed to the American Continent and for this work, now reissued in enlarged and revised form, the author has given the ripest and best part of his life. When the first edition of this work was issued, in 1889, Professor Wright had been for fifteen years prominent in glacial investigations. He had published numerous articles in the scientific journals recounting his discoveries in New England, had traced the southern boundary of the glaciated region in America from the Atlantic Ocean to the Mississippi River, and published the results in Vol. Z. of the Pennsylvania Reports, and in Tract No. 60, of the Western Reserve Historical Society of Cleveland, which had kept him in the field for three years. His delineation of the glaciated boundary east of the Mississippi is that found on all maps at the present time. Later he completed investigations in this area and published the results in Bulletin No. 58 of the U. S. Geological Survey. In 1886, the opportunity came for him to visit Alaska and make protracted observations on the Muir Glacier, which though beginning to be visited by tourists had not been subjected to scientific scrutiny, and it was four years before any other scientific investigations of the glacier were carried on. He was then invited to give a course of Lowell Institute Lectures in Boston upon the subject that is the title of this book. Thus it appears that Professor Wright was unusually prepared for his work, so that it was not strange that his book took rank at once as the standard publication on the subject. The first edition of 1,500 copies, though sold at $5.00 a copy, was disposed of during the first season. Since then three more editions have been called for and the demand was such that the author has felt justified in spending a large amount of time and money in bringing the treatise up to date in this fifth revised and enlarged edition. Speaking of the fifth and latest edition, the veteran geologist, Pro-

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 467 [Click for larger image]Page 467

stimulation of his firm assurance that all is well here below and all will be better in the world beyond. His life was above reproach, his career an inspiration. None knew him but to love him, none named him but to praise. No organization with which h e was connected seemed to give him greater pleasure than the Archaeological and Historical Society. Its field of investigation, its province of collecting and preserving the records of the past and its work of storing the same for future generations of students, particularly appealed to his intellectual activities and his fondness for knowledge of what has been, what is and what may be. In the pantheon of those who have been most potent in the origin and growth of this Society—the memory of no one will be more permanent or more revered than that of Roeliff Brinkerhoff. SITE OF FORT GOWER. An interesting and in forming volume could be written on Little Journeys to Historic Sites in Ohio, and it is one of the dreams of the Editor of the Quarterly to some day put forth such a volume. Meanwhile, as time permits such "little journeys" are being made. It was on a brilliant day last August (1911) that the Editor "tripped" to what in some respects is one of the most historic sites in Ohio. Many articles have been penned and published on the pioneer forts of Ohio. No state in the Northwest Territory can boast of as many stockades in the early days as can the Buckeye commonwealth. Romantic, dramatic and patriotic are the records of many of them. The French fort of 1745 a t the mouth of the Sandusky, the scene of Nicholas' conspiracy; the stockade defense at Loramie's on the Pickawillany, the scene of the prelude of the contest between the French and the British for the Northwest Territory; the first fort built by the Americans, in the American Revolution, the famous Fort Laurens near the present site of Bolivar; Fort Stephenson (Fremont) on the Sandusky, the scene of the siege of Croghan's little band attacked by Proctor and his British veterans aided by Tecumseh and his horde of western savages, in the War of 1812; there are few stories in warfare equal to it for display of bravery and patriotism. But the fort least known to general history—for it is not mentioned by any of the leading historians—and yet most significant in western annals, for an event connected therewith, is Fort Gower at the mouth of the Hocking, or Hockhocking, as it was once called from the Indian name " Hockin-hockin." It was the year 1774 in the month of June that the English Parliament passed the detested Quebec Act—an affirmation of the previous so-called Quebec Act of 1763. This act of 1774, provided a government for the Province o f Quebec, embracing the territorial domain west and north of the Ohio River—known later as the Northwest Territory.

Published in Volume XX — 1911
Page 2 of 7

Recently Added

  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 389

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 389 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 389

    Mr. Bolzius. In it many lies were told about our Brethren and many wicked things were falsely reported about them. This letter, covering two sheets, was read by Bolzius to the people one afternoon, instead of a sermon, after having administered the holy communion in the forenoon. This has stirred up the people against us. On the 2nd, I visited Mr. Ade, a shoemaker, and later Michael Schweizer, to whom I delivered a letter from Bro. Hagen. In the evening Bro. Brownfield, together with Henry Beck* and John Bay, had their usual meeting, to which they also invited Bro. Hussey and myself. On the 3rd and 4th, I visited a number of people. On the 5th, being Christmas (i. e., December 25th, old style), I preached a German sermon in Savannah, in the house of the Brethren. A number of people came together, when they heard that a strange minister was there. In the afternoon but very few came. After the services a man spoke to me, who at one time intended to stab Bro. Hagen. His name is Bellico. But he is now converted and he requested me in his name to ask Bro. Hagen's forgiveness. On the 6th, as on Monday after Christmas, I preached to the Germans at the "White Ploff." I also visited an awakened man and friend, Berger. He asked me to visit him frequently, which I did. As a result he was deposed from his office as elder of the Reformed congregation, because, as the people said, he had fallen away from his religion. On the 7th, I returned again to Savannah, where I visited several Germans, among others Mr. Astherr. On the 12th, I preached in Savannah in the forenoon, and in settled at Ebenezer, twenty-four miles from Savannah. Other colonists followed soon afterwards. See P. A. Strobel, The Salzburgers and their Descendants. Baltim re, 1855. * Brownfield and Beck were among the first adherents of the Moravians in Savannah. Brownfield had come to Georgia from England in February, 1737, with General Oglethorpe. Beck had arrived in 1738, and was for a time a member of the "Whitefield Economy." Both left Georgia in 1745 and settled in Bethlehem. Both were later ordained deacons and died at Bethlehem. See Register of Moravians, pp. 73 f. and 77.

    Be the first to comment! Read 747 times
  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 280

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 280 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 280

    with Bro. Haberland and Herman Loesch across the river in the canoe, swimming their horses across. They intended to go to Mr. Altem to-day, who knows our land very well, in order to go with him to our land to-morrow, to select a place where we could rest temporarily till we could find the right place to settle. Bru. Grube stayed with the rest of the brethren on this side of the river, because the water was still too high. In the evening a German boy canme to us, who lives on the "Etkin" [Yadkin]. He had bought eleven quarts of salt at the Smith River for which hie paid half a dollar [½ Thaler]. On November 16, we rose early to cross the river. As the banks were very steep we had to tie a tree to the wagon, which we detached as soon as the wagon reached the water. The stream was very rapid and carried the front horses down a short distance. The water almost ran into our wagon, but we reached the other shore safely. However, we were tunable to drive up. We had to unload half of our baggage, fasten ropes to the tongue of the wagon, so that we could also help in pulling, because our horses were very stiff, and finally we brought our ark safely to the dry shore. Half a mile farther we drove through a wide swamp, aud then up a long hill. We ate our dinner at a creek, close to a plantation. At four o'clock we came to Mr. Altem, ten miles from our last camping place, but it was almost the worst part of our whole journey. Our dear Gottlob, Nathanael, Loesch, etc., joined us again. They had inspected our land somewhat, and six miles from the boundary line found a little house on our land, which a German had built last year, but had abandoned again. We pitched our tent near Mr. Altem's house. Bro. Gottlob, Nathanael and the other brethren, who had been along on our land to-day, ate at Mr. Altem's. Then we lay down to rest, for we were very tired and exhausted. On November 17, we rose early. We had had a cold night. It looked like snow. Several brethren preceded us with picks and axes to cut out a road and to level the banks of the creeks, A mile this side of Altem's we crossed the Down Fork Creek, and then we came to the new road, which runs through our land to the "Etkin" [Yadkin] River. On the right side of the creek is a plantation. The people presented us with two bags full of pumpkinis and said that we could have a whole wagon

    Be the first to comment! Read 870 times
  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 64

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 64 [Click for larger image]Page 64

    TARHE — THE CRANE. [The Editor of The Ohio State Archæological and Historical Quarterly has often received inquiries as to sources of information concerning Tarhe, the famous Wyandot chief, and also the "Half King," Pomoacan. Mr. Basil Meek, the historical writer and a frequent contributor to the columns of the Quarterly, has had occasion to gather these sources and we herewith publish them for the benefit of any student desiring to avail himself of these valuable references. — Editor.] Please find a few facts, concerning Tarhe—the Crane, some of which may shed light upon his residence and also upon his life and character. The "Half King", Pomoacan, seems never to have been located at Lower Sandusky. Attention is called to Half King's various Indian cognomens, given below. TARHE, OR THE CRANE. In the Spring of 1782, according to Homer Everett in his History of Sandusky County, p. 43, citing for his authority "Heckewelder's Indian Nations," without giving page, claims that Crane rescued a young man-captive, at Lower Sandusky, after the captive had been sent by him to Half King at Upper Sandusky to be adopted, but having been rejected by Half King's wife, was returned to Lower Sandusky for burning. Thereupon Crane, he says, after an appeal to his vanity by the English traders, Robbins and Arundel located there, he rescued the captive. But I believe the chief, who rescued this captive was not Crane, but Abraham Kuhn, the War Chief, who commanded the Lower Sandusky Wyandots at Crawford's defeat. I have not seen Heckewelder, cited by Everett. See History of the Girtys, by Butterfield, pp. 149, 150, 151. In 1785 Tarhe's name does not appear to the treaty of Ft. McIntosh. It was signed for Wyandots of Lower Sandusky by Abraham Kuhn. Half King's name is not attached to same unless by the name, Daunghquat, which is probable.

    Be the first to comment! Read 3676 times