Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 466 [Click for larger image]Page 466

EDITORIALANA. VOL. XX. No. 4. OCTOBER, 1911. GENERAL BRINKERHOFF. Elsewhere in this Quarterly we give notice of the death of General Brinkerhoff with an extended account of his busy and useful life and many of its prominent achievement's. But no written record of the life of such a man can adequately present what he really was to the world in which he lived. The in estimable outflow of a beautiful and true character, ever loyal to the highest ideals of life, cannot be recorded, cannot be duly valued, cannot in the fullest extent be appreciated. Back of all he did, broad and lasting as it may have been, is the man. Therein lay his power, his sway, over fellowmen. Sweet and gentle in disposition, ever courteous and urbane in manner, tenacious of his own convictions, when once formed, but tolerant of the views and beliefs of others, his life was a benign atmosphere, soothing and strengthening to all with whom he came in contact. He loved men, he loved children, he loved nature in all her varied forms, and buoyed by a hopeful and optimistic temperament, he rose above the petty annoyances of everyday experience and above the greater trials and disappointments in effort and ambition. He was ever a thoughtful and sincere student. All realms of knowledge attracted his receptive and capacious mind. He studied men and knew human nature. He read books and absorbed their contents. The problem of life was ever fresh and deeply interesting to him. The greater Query of the future was his constant meditation. He was unhampered by the dogmas of narrow sectarians, but he was steadfast in the belief of a divine and supreme intelligence and the adjustment in a better and unseen world of all that seemed wrong or awry in this. He had a deep sense of responsibility. Every duty that came to him was earnestly and painstakingly discharged. He sympathized with the distressed and the unfortunate. . It was ever his chosen task to help others by word or deed. Selfishness found no lodging in his makeup. Such men live the highest life in this world of flesh and blood and accomplish things for themselves and others, and the memory of such men is a lasting impetus to those who survive them. Through a period of nearly twenty years the present writer knew, admired and respected Roeliff Brinkerhoff. Many a delightful hour have we spent in his presence, an auditor to his rare and interesting reminiscences, a recipient of his helpful cheer and a beneficiary of the

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 462 [Click for larger image]Page 462

Map accompanying Draper MSS. account of Brady's Leap. Map shows Indian trail, place of Brady's Leap and Lake Brady. The squares are one-half mile square.

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 457 [Click for larger image]Page 457

BRADY'S LEAP. BY E. O. RANDALL. In what is known as "Tract 29," issued in 1875 by the West ern Reserve Historical Society, the "tradition"—as the Tract calls it—of Brady's leap is related. That a famous leap by Brady was made, at the place generally designated as the site, there is little or no doubt. The time and attending circumstances of the achievement are much in dispute, and wrote Mr. L. V. Bierce, in 1 856, "the numerous traditions respecting Brady's Leap across the Cuyahoga River, and many other hair breadth escapes and adventures of that old frontiersman grow more and more vague and conflicting with the lapse of time." "Tract 29" consists mainly of a letter written at Akron, in 1856, to one Seth Day, by Frederick Wadsworth, in which letter Wadsworth states that in 1802 he was residing in Pittsburg and there met "a man by the name of John Sumerall," who had long lived in Pittsburg and who had been an "intimate friend of Brady," from whom he (Sumerall) learned the particulars of his (Brady's) life and adventures. According to Sumerall's account Samuel Brady "a powerful strong man, kind hearted, but an uncompromising and deadly enemy to the Indians," lived in his youth in Pennsylvania. During an Indian raid the people of Brady's settlement were killed and Brady escaping "swore eternal enmity to .the whole Indian race. " Sumerall relates to Wadsworth many of the encounters Brady had with the red men and among escapades the one involving the famous leap. Sumerall gave Wadsworth the date of this feat but the latter failed to remember it. This lapse of memory by Wadsworth is unfortunate as that is the main point in dispute by different relators of the incident. Wadsworth recites the story at some length as he had it from Sumerall who had it from Brady. Briefly the account is that Brady—at the time in question, date not given-left Pitts-

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 415 [Click for larger image]Page 415

THE BATTLE OF LAKE ERIE IN BALLAD AND HISTORY. BY CHARLES B.GALBREATH. Perry's victory on Lake Erie stands out pre-eminent among the naval exploits of the War of 1812. And this is true, not only by virtue of the comparative importance of the battle and its results, but because it combined in an unusual degree the elements of intrepidity, patriotic fervor and personal valor that captivate the imagination, live in legend and story and song, and make up what we are pleased to style the poetry of war. In spite of Cooper's criticism of the young commander, and the contention of Roosevelt that the battle was not a remarkable achievement—that greater things had been accomplished by McDonough on Lake Champlain, the commanding figure of Perry, as he passes from the shattered Lawrence to the Niagara in a frail boat through a storm of bullets and grape-shot, stands forth undimmed and undiminished in its original luster and heroic proportions. The premonitory silence of the approaching fleets; the daring advance of the commander's ship; the roar of cannon and the fierce onslaught of the encircling line of the enemy; the shattered hull, the splintered masts and the reeking deck of the Lawrence, where valor strove desperately to keep aloft the stars and stripes and the banner inscribed, "Don't give up the ship;" the reckless bravery of Perry as he bore the latter from his flag-ship and raised it over the Niagara; the striking of the colors of the Lawrence; the fierce renewal of the combat; victory snatched from the jaws of defeat; the thunders of floating armaments forever silenced on our northern "inland seas!” In the short space of a few hours we have here, on the romantic waters of the West, in action and fortune, an event dramatic and kaleidoscopic, that lives in ballad and history, and sheds luster on the "men behind the guns," the young commander, and the young republic. The battle of Lake Erie is doubtless destined to more

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 404 [Click for larger image]Page 404

WILLIAM H. WEST. BY WILLIAM Z. DAVIS. [The following is an address in memory of Judge William H. West, delivered by Hon. William Z. Davis, of the Ohio Supreme Court, at the meeting of the Ohio Bar Association, Cedar Point, July 12, 1911.] This writing is not a biography but an appreciation of one of the most notable members of the Ohio Bar in his generation. WILLIAM H. WEST.

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Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
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Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 402 [Click for larger image]Page 402

6. Stuart, James — "Three Years in North America." (Edinburgh, 1833. ) Vol. II. 7. Shirreff, Patrick — " A Tour through North America." (Edinburgh, 1835.) 8. Steele, Mrs. Eliza R. — "A Summer Journey in the West." (New York, 1841.) 9. Buckingham, J. S. — " Eastern and Western States of America." (London , 1842.) Vol. II. 10. Godwin , Parke — " Prose Writings of Wm. Cullen Bryant." Vol. II; Bryant Wm. C. — "Illinois Fifty Years Ago." (New York, 1901.) 11. Dicken s, Charles — “American Notes." (London, 1908.) 12. Fordham , Elias Oym — "Personal Narratives of Travels in Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky." (Cleveland, 1906.) NEWSPAPERS. 1. Niles Weekly Register. 2. “Liberty Hall." 1811-1812; 1811-1815. 3. "Liberty Hall and Cincinnati Gazette." 1816 on. 4. "The Western Spy." 1820-1822. THAT OLD LOG HOUSE WHERE USED TO BE OUR FARM. By D. TOD GILLIAM, COLUMBUS, OHIO. They ain't no houses anywhere what makes a feelin' so warm, As that old house, up 'mong the trees, where used to be our farm. That house wer' built of logs, an' chinked an' daubed all 'roun', Inside them logs wer' one big room, what kivered lots o’ 'groun'. The clapboard roof, held down by poles, as ev'rybody knowed, Wer' proof agin the rain an' snow, 'cept when it rained or snowed. The doors was paw'ful hefty, an' hung on hick'ry wood, An' opened with a latch-string; special them what front-ways stood. The winders wern't so many, nor wern't so awful bright, They stood 'longside them front-way doors an' guv but little light. The floors was made of puncheon, the earth wer' made of clay,

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 378 [Click for larger image]Page 378

EARLY STEAM BOAT TRAVEL ON THE OHIO RIVER. BY LESLIE S. HENSHAW, CINCINNATI, OHIO. October, 1911, marks a centennial of considerable importance to the Western country, for it was in that month in 1811, that the first steamboat on Western waters, passed down the Ohio River. The boat, a "side-wheeler",1 was built at Pittsburgh, under the direction of Nicholas J. Roosevelt of New York, an agent of Fulton, the inventor, and Livingston, the financial aid, and was called the "New Orleans."2 It passed Cincinnati on the twenty-seventh of October3 and arrived at Louisville on the twenty-eighth.4 The Cincinnati newspaper, "Liberty Hall", in its issue of Wednesday, October thirtieth, 1811, adds a small note to commercial and ship news to the following effect: "On Sunday last. the steamboat lately built at Pittsburgh passed this town at 5 o'clock in the afternoon in fine stile, going at the rate of about 10 or 12 miles an hour." The water was too low to allow passage over the falls, so to prove that it could navigate against the current, the boat made several trips between Louisville and Cincinnati and, on November twenty-seventh, arrived at Cincinnati in forty-five hours from the falls.5 When the water rose, the "New Orleans" proceeded on its way towards its destination and arrived at Natchez, late in December6 and plied as a regular packet between Natchez and New Orleans for several years. Following the "New Orleans", a group of boats was built at Pittsburgh; the "Comet" under the French patent; the "Vesuvius" and the "Aetna" on the Fulton plan. In the meantime, Brownsville had entered the field as a steamboat building town, for the "Enterprise" was constructed there and later, the engine for the "Washington," under the supervision of Captain Henry M. Shreve, while the boat itself was built at Wheeling. This boat by its voyage in 1817, from Shippingport to New Orleans and back in forty-five days. convinced the skeptical public that steamboat navigation would succeed on Western

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
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Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 368 [Click for larger image]Page 368

CELEBRATION OF THE SURRENDER OF GENERAL JOHN H. MORGAN. An account by Morgan’s Captor, Major George W. Rue On September 21, 1910, there was celebrated on the Crubaugh Farm, South of Lisbon, Columbiana county, near the historic spot where the event occurred, the 47th Anniversary of the Surrender of the Confederate Raider, General Morgan. Concerning the celebration the East Liverpool Tribune of September 22 , 1910, made the following comment: Romance and intrigue combined to make history in that hot July of 1863, when handsome, foolhardy General John H. :Morgan, cavalier debonaire of the southland, and idol of the famous blue grass region of Kentucky, dashed from under cover of his native heath, through Indiana, into Ohio, and finally reached the highest point ever attained by a Confederate force before he was captured on the Crubaugh farm near West Point by another equally as intrepid as himself, also a Kentuckian by birth, but arrayed on the side of the Union, Major George W. Rue. Morgan, the Confederate raider, has passed into the great beyond, but yesterday East Liverpool and Columbiana county was honored by the presence of his captor, Major George W. MAJOR GEO. W . RUE.

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
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Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 353 [Click for larger image]Page 353

On Sunday, June 4. 1911, at 9:30 in the evening, at his beloved home in Mansfield, Ohio, the soul of General Roeliff Brinkerhoff took its peaceful flight to the eternal life beyond. At the time of his demise General Brinkerhoff was President Emeritus ROELIFF BRINKERHOFF.

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
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Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 351 [Click for larger image]Page 351

Wait on the Queen of Arts in her own bowers, Perfumed with all the fragrance of the earth From blooming shrubbery and radiant flowers; And hope with rapture wed life's calm and peaceful hours Oft as the spring wakes on the verdant year, And nature glows in fervid beauty dress'd, The loves and graces shall commingle here, To charm the queenly City of the West; Her stately youth with noble warmth impress'd Her graceful daughters, smiling as in May—Apollos these, and Hebes those confessed; Bloom in her warm and fertilizing ray, While round their happy sires the cherub infants play. So sings the Muse as she with fancy's eye, Scans, from imagination's lofty height, Thy radiant beaming day—where it doth lie In the deep future; glowing on the night From whose dark womb, empires unveil to light; Mantled and diademed and sceptered there Thou waitest but the advent of thy flight. When like a royal Queen, stately and fair, The City of the West ascends the regal chair. A PROPHECY,* BY RETURN JONATHAN MEIGS. Enough of tributary praise is paid To virtue living or to merit, dead. To happier themes the rural muse invites, To calmest pleasures and serene delights. To us, glad fancy brightest prospects shows; Rejoicing nature all around us glows; Here late the savage, hid in ambush, lay, Or roamed the uncultured valleys for his prey; Here frowned the forest with terrific shade; No cultured fields exposed the opening glade; How changed the scene! See nature clothed in smiles

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 404

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 404 [Click for larger image]Page 404

    WILLIAM H. WEST. BY WILLIAM Z. DAVIS. [The following is an address in memory of Judge William H. West, delivered by Hon. William Z. Davis, of the Ohio Supreme Court, at the meeting of the Ohio Bar Association, Cedar Point, July 12, 1911.] This writing is not a biography but an appreciation of one of the most notable members of the Ohio Bar in his generation. WILLIAM H. WEST.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 69

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 69 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 69

    not pleased with the preaching of the Brethren, but become angry and bitter about it. When they learned afterwards that Bro. Schnell was a Herrnhutter, they wanted to pick a quarrel with Daehlinger, because he did not only not arrest him, but allowed him to preach and even helped him along with his horses. I felt the bitter, hostile and sarcastic spirit of the people in that district very much, and as the conditions were the same at Cedar Creek and in some respects even worse, I did not have the heart to preach to these people, but left again on the next day. The door at these two places is really closed. On April 4-March 24, I crossed the "Missinotty" [Massanutton] Mountain, and, passing the well known Paul's Fort,28 I came to "Missinotty." The road was full of water, stones and wood, so that I had often to think for a while which way the road went. At night I lodged with a Mennonite teacher [minister], Hans Rothen.29 I spoke with him about many things. By nature he is a good, pliable man, but without life. On April 5-March 25, I went to Mafthias Selzer,30 whose wife is the daughter of Jacob Beyerly. He is a rude and hostile man towards the Brethren. I was compelled to stay with this man all afternoon, because I wanted to make inquiries about the people in that district and because I was surrounded by water and terribly high mountains on all sides. He treated me very 28 Powell's Fort, a picturesque valley in the Massanutton range of mouintains. It was so called for one Powell, an Englishman, who, according to tradition, was a counterfeiter. He seems to have been nearly contemporaneous with the first settlements in the lower valley. For further account of this man and locality, see Kercheval's History of the Valley, second edition, p. 267. (Appendix.) 29 The Anglicised name of this man was John Roads. In August, 1766, a party of eight Indians and one white man crossed the Massanutton mountain at Powell's Fort and massacred Roads, his wife, and three sons. See Kercheval's History of the Valley, sec. ed., p 91. 30 In 1751 Mathias Selzer was a member of the County Court of Augusta couinty, Va. See Summer's History of Soutlhwestern Virginia, Richmond, 1903, p. 821, where his name is erroneously printed Seltger. He evidently resided in the southern portion of what is now Page, or the eastern portion of present Rockingham county, which territory was then embraced in Augusta. He was doubtless appointed to represent the rapidly increasing German element in that section of the valley.

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  • The History… of the Potsdam Congregation, Page 4

    The History of the Potsdam Congregation
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    Page 4— The History… of the Potsdam Congregation [Click for larger image] title=Page 4

    Isaac Ditmer 1862-1937 Lovina [Cunning] Ditmer 1859-1937 Irene [Bridenbaugh] Ditmer 1888-1961 John Henry Ditmer 1851-1930 Susanna [Steffey] Ditmer 1853-1930 Michael Ditmer 1856-1927 Rollin Ditmer 1883-1960 Jennie [Christian]Eikenberry 1887-1974 Josiah Eikenberry 1886-1967 Mina [Waitman] Eikenberry 1884-1959 Dale Fourman 1908-1965 Fanny [Christian] Fourman 1888-1976 Galen Fourman 1910-1982 Phares Fourman 1887-1967 Gladys [Hoke] Furlong 1903-1885 Anna Galbreath Ethel [Miller] Ganger 1886-1966 John Henry Ganger 1869-1955 Leonard Ganger 1908-1982 Zora [Delk] McCowenGanger 1884-1936 Lilly [Black] Green 1880-1963 Alice [Nease] Hall 1888-1975 Amos Hall 1864-1958 Elizabeth [Ditmer] Hall 1867-1927 Esther [Baker] Hall 1908-2002 Oscar Hall 1896-1983 Perry Hall 1864-1957 Samuel Hall 1883-1959 Estella [Miller] Hall 1900-1969 Susie [Clement] Hall 1868-1948 John Heckman 1864-1940 Lulu [Miller] Heckman 1910-2000 Mary [Ganger] Heckman 1877-1953 Emma [Miller] Heisey 1882-1944 Lester Heisey 1881-1950 Forest Henderson 1912-2004 Harold Henderson 1910-1975 Homer Henderson 1904-1993 Velma [Schenk] Hepner 1908-1994 Arthur Hess 1855-1929 Caroline [Cornor] Hess 1855-1925 Charles Hissong 1872-1954 Sadie [Hall] Hissong 1885-1973 Lovina [Miller] Hoffman 1908-1971 David E. Hoke 1870-1939 David C. Hoke 1909-1984 Edna Hoke 1899-1947 Lina [Dohner] Hoke 1872-1954 Dorothy [Myers] Honeyman 1905-1990 Lola [Longanecker] Henderson Honeyman 1883-1967 Ruth [Miller] Hypes 1914-1993 Charles Isenbarger 1866-1941 Dora [Falknor] Isenbarger 1868-1955 Andrew Jackson Johnston 1872-1943 Audrey [Bowman] Johnston 1896-1968 Arrabell [Norris] Johnston 1879-1960 Edward Johnston 1893-1984 Elgar Johnston 1906-1959 Ella [Kress] Johnston 1867-1953 John H. Johnston 1868-1937 Treva Johnston 1903-1995 Mary [Hoke] Kauffman 1904-1973 Emma [Wolfe] WestermanKress 1881-1962 William Kress 1870-1949 Alice [Besecker] Kunkleman 1909-1997 Nancy [Timmons] CarsonLambert 1852-1929 Levi Litten 1864-1927 Rosetta [Netzley] Litten 1865-1932 Davis Longanecker 1857-1946 Lydia [Isenbarger]Longanecker 1857-1931 Anna [Puterbaugh]McGillvary 1901-1984 Treva Marshall c1901- Curtis Miller 1903-2001 David Miller 1906-1992 Elizabeth [Gordon] Miller 1858-1943 Harley Miller 1880-1958 Isaac Miller 1868-1931 John Miller 1844-1925 Martha [Stager] Miller 1880-1962 Sarah [Falknor] Miller 1844-1929 Calvin Minnich 1880-1947

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