Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 466 [Click for larger image]Page 466

EDITORIALANA. VOL. XX. No. 4. OCTOBER, 1911. GENERAL BRINKERHOFF. Elsewhere in this Quarterly we give notice of the death of General Brinkerhoff with an extended account of his busy and useful life and many of its prominent achievement's. But no written record of the life of such a man can adequately present what he really was to the world in which he lived. The in estimable outflow of a beautiful and true character, ever loyal to the highest ideals of life, cannot be recorded, cannot be duly valued, cannot in the fullest extent be appreciated. Back of all he did, broad and lasting as it may have been, is the man. Therein lay his power, his sway, over fellowmen. Sweet and gentle in disposition, ever courteous and urbane in manner, tenacious of his own convictions, when once formed, but tolerant of the views and beliefs of others, his life was a benign atmosphere, soothing and strengthening to all with whom he came in contact. He loved men, he loved children, he loved nature in all her varied forms, and buoyed by a hopeful and optimistic temperament, he rose above the petty annoyances of everyday experience and above the greater trials and disappointments in effort and ambition. He was ever a thoughtful and sincere student. All realms of knowledge attracted his receptive and capacious mind. He studied men and knew human nature. He read books and absorbed their contents. The problem of life was ever fresh and deeply interesting to him. The greater Query of the future was his constant meditation. He was unhampered by the dogmas of narrow sectarians, but he was steadfast in the belief of a divine and supreme intelligence and the adjustment in a better and unseen world of all that seemed wrong or awry in this. He had a deep sense of responsibility. Every duty that came to him was earnestly and painstakingly discharged. He sympathized with the distressed and the unfortunate. . It was ever his chosen task to help others by word or deed. Selfishness found no lodging in his makeup. Such men live the highest life in this world of flesh and blood and accomplish things for themselves and others, and the memory of such men is a lasting impetus to those who survive them. Through a period of nearly twenty years the present writer knew, admired and respected Roeliff Brinkerhoff. Many a delightful hour have we spent in his presence, an auditor to his rare and interesting reminiscences, a recipient of his helpful cheer and a beneficiary of the

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 462 [Click for larger image]Page 462

Map accompanying Draper MSS. account of Brady's Leap. Map shows Indian trail, place of Brady's Leap and Lake Brady. The squares are one-half mile square.

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Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
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Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 457 [Click for larger image]Page 457

BRADY'S LEAP. BY E. O. RANDALL. In what is known as "Tract 29," issued in 1875 by the West ern Reserve Historical Society, the "tradition"—as the Tract calls it—of Brady's leap is related. That a famous leap by Brady was made, at the place generally designated as the site, there is little or no doubt. The time and attending circumstances of the achievement are much in dispute, and wrote Mr. L. V. Bierce, in 1 856, "the numerous traditions respecting Brady's Leap across the Cuyahoga River, and many other hair breadth escapes and adventures of that old frontiersman grow more and more vague and conflicting with the lapse of time." "Tract 29" consists mainly of a letter written at Akron, in 1856, to one Seth Day, by Frederick Wadsworth, in which letter Wadsworth states that in 1802 he was residing in Pittsburg and there met "a man by the name of John Sumerall," who had long lived in Pittsburg and who had been an "intimate friend of Brady," from whom he (Sumerall) learned the particulars of his (Brady's) life and adventures. According to Sumerall's account Samuel Brady "a powerful strong man, kind hearted, but an uncompromising and deadly enemy to the Indians," lived in his youth in Pennsylvania. During an Indian raid the people of Brady's settlement were killed and Brady escaping "swore eternal enmity to .the whole Indian race. " Sumerall relates to Wadsworth many of the encounters Brady had with the red men and among escapades the one involving the famous leap. Sumerall gave Wadsworth the date of this feat but the latter failed to remember it. This lapse of memory by Wadsworth is unfortunate as that is the main point in dispute by different relators of the incident. Wadsworth recites the story at some length as he had it from Sumerall who had it from Brady. Briefly the account is that Brady—at the time in question, date not given-left Pitts-

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 415 [Click for larger image]Page 415

THE BATTLE OF LAKE ERIE IN BALLAD AND HISTORY. BY CHARLES B.GALBREATH. Perry's victory on Lake Erie stands out pre-eminent among the naval exploits of the War of 1812. And this is true, not only by virtue of the comparative importance of the battle and its results, but because it combined in an unusual degree the elements of intrepidity, patriotic fervor and personal valor that captivate the imagination, live in legend and story and song, and make up what we are pleased to style the poetry of war. In spite of Cooper's criticism of the young commander, and the contention of Roosevelt that the battle was not a remarkable achievement—that greater things had been accomplished by McDonough on Lake Champlain, the commanding figure of Perry, as he passes from the shattered Lawrence to the Niagara in a frail boat through a storm of bullets and grape-shot, stands forth undimmed and undiminished in its original luster and heroic proportions. The premonitory silence of the approaching fleets; the daring advance of the commander's ship; the roar of cannon and the fierce onslaught of the encircling line of the enemy; the shattered hull, the splintered masts and the reeking deck of the Lawrence, where valor strove desperately to keep aloft the stars and stripes and the banner inscribed, "Don't give up the ship;" the reckless bravery of Perry as he bore the latter from his flag-ship and raised it over the Niagara; the striking of the colors of the Lawrence; the fierce renewal of the combat; victory snatched from the jaws of defeat; the thunders of floating armaments forever silenced on our northern "inland seas!” In the short space of a few hours we have here, on the romantic waters of the West, in action and fortune, an event dramatic and kaleidoscopic, that lives in ballad and history, and sheds luster on the "men behind the guns," the young commander, and the young republic. The battle of Lake Erie is doubtless destined to more

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 404 [Click for larger image]Page 404

WILLIAM H. WEST. BY WILLIAM Z. DAVIS. [The following is an address in memory of Judge William H. West, delivered by Hon. William Z. Davis, of the Ohio Supreme Court, at the meeting of the Ohio Bar Association, Cedar Point, July 12, 1911.] This writing is not a biography but an appreciation of one of the most notable members of the Ohio Bar in his generation. WILLIAM H. WEST.

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Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 402 [Click for larger image]Page 402

6. Stuart, James — "Three Years in North America." (Edinburgh, 1833. ) Vol. II. 7. Shirreff, Patrick — " A Tour through North America." (Edinburgh, 1835.) 8. Steele, Mrs. Eliza R. — "A Summer Journey in the West." (New York, 1841.) 9. Buckingham, J. S. — " Eastern and Western States of America." (London , 1842.) Vol. II. 10. Godwin , Parke — " Prose Writings of Wm. Cullen Bryant." Vol. II; Bryant Wm. C. — "Illinois Fifty Years Ago." (New York, 1901.) 11. Dicken s, Charles — “American Notes." (London, 1908.) 12. Fordham , Elias Oym — "Personal Narratives of Travels in Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky." (Cleveland, 1906.) NEWSPAPERS. 1. Niles Weekly Register. 2. “Liberty Hall." 1811-1812; 1811-1815. 3. "Liberty Hall and Cincinnati Gazette." 1816 on. 4. "The Western Spy." 1820-1822. THAT OLD LOG HOUSE WHERE USED TO BE OUR FARM. By D. TOD GILLIAM, COLUMBUS, OHIO. They ain't no houses anywhere what makes a feelin' so warm, As that old house, up 'mong the trees, where used to be our farm. That house wer' built of logs, an' chinked an' daubed all 'roun', Inside them logs wer' one big room, what kivered lots o’ 'groun'. The clapboard roof, held down by poles, as ev'rybody knowed, Wer' proof agin the rain an' snow, 'cept when it rained or snowed. The doors was paw'ful hefty, an' hung on hick'ry wood, An' opened with a latch-string; special them what front-ways stood. The winders wern't so many, nor wern't so awful bright, They stood 'longside them front-way doors an' guv but little light. The floors was made of puncheon, the earth wer' made of clay,

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 378 [Click for larger image]Page 378

EARLY STEAM BOAT TRAVEL ON THE OHIO RIVER. BY LESLIE S. HENSHAW, CINCINNATI, OHIO. October, 1911, marks a centennial of considerable importance to the Western country, for it was in that month in 1811, that the first steamboat on Western waters, passed down the Ohio River. The boat, a "side-wheeler",1 was built at Pittsburgh, under the direction of Nicholas J. Roosevelt of New York, an agent of Fulton, the inventor, and Livingston, the financial aid, and was called the "New Orleans."2 It passed Cincinnati on the twenty-seventh of October3 and arrived at Louisville on the twenty-eighth.4 The Cincinnati newspaper, "Liberty Hall", in its issue of Wednesday, October thirtieth, 1811, adds a small note to commercial and ship news to the following effect: "On Sunday last. the steamboat lately built at Pittsburgh passed this town at 5 o'clock in the afternoon in fine stile, going at the rate of about 10 or 12 miles an hour." The water was too low to allow passage over the falls, so to prove that it could navigate against the current, the boat made several trips between Louisville and Cincinnati and, on November twenty-seventh, arrived at Cincinnati in forty-five hours from the falls.5 When the water rose, the "New Orleans" proceeded on its way towards its destination and arrived at Natchez, late in December6 and plied as a regular packet between Natchez and New Orleans for several years. Following the "New Orleans", a group of boats was built at Pittsburgh; the "Comet" under the French patent; the "Vesuvius" and the "Aetna" on the Fulton plan. In the meantime, Brownsville had entered the field as a steamboat building town, for the "Enterprise" was constructed there and later, the engine for the "Washington," under the supervision of Captain Henry M. Shreve, while the boat itself was built at Wheeling. This boat by its voyage in 1817, from Shippingport to New Orleans and back in forty-five days. convinced the skeptical public that steamboat navigation would succeed on Western

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
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Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 368 [Click for larger image]Page 368

CELEBRATION OF THE SURRENDER OF GENERAL JOHN H. MORGAN. An account by Morgan’s Captor, Major George W. Rue On September 21, 1910, there was celebrated on the Crubaugh Farm, South of Lisbon, Columbiana county, near the historic spot where the event occurred, the 47th Anniversary of the Surrender of the Confederate Raider, General Morgan. Concerning the celebration the East Liverpool Tribune of September 22 , 1910, made the following comment: Romance and intrigue combined to make history in that hot July of 1863, when handsome, foolhardy General John H. :Morgan, cavalier debonaire of the southland, and idol of the famous blue grass region of Kentucky, dashed from under cover of his native heath, through Indiana, into Ohio, and finally reached the highest point ever attained by a Confederate force before he was captured on the Crubaugh farm near West Point by another equally as intrepid as himself, also a Kentuckian by birth, but arrayed on the side of the Union, Major George W. Rue. Morgan, the Confederate raider, has passed into the great beyond, but yesterday East Liverpool and Columbiana county was honored by the presence of his captor, Major George W. MAJOR GEO. W . RUE.

Published in Volume XX — 1911

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Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 353 [Click for larger image]Page 353

On Sunday, June 4. 1911, at 9:30 in the evening, at his beloved home in Mansfield, Ohio, the soul of General Roeliff Brinkerhoff took its peaceful flight to the eternal life beyond. At the time of his demise General Brinkerhoff was President Emeritus ROELIFF BRINKERHOFF.

Published in Volume XX — 1911

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Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 351 [Click for larger image]Page 351

Wait on the Queen of Arts in her own bowers, Perfumed with all the fragrance of the earth From blooming shrubbery and radiant flowers; And hope with rapture wed life's calm and peaceful hours Oft as the spring wakes on the verdant year, And nature glows in fervid beauty dress'd, The loves and graces shall commingle here, To charm the queenly City of the West; Her stately youth with noble warmth impress'd Her graceful daughters, smiling as in May—Apollos these, and Hebes those confessed; Bloom in her warm and fertilizing ray, While round their happy sires the cherub infants play. So sings the Muse as she with fancy's eye, Scans, from imagination's lofty height, Thy radiant beaming day—where it doth lie In the deep future; glowing on the night From whose dark womb, empires unveil to light; Mantled and diademed and sceptered there Thou waitest but the advent of thy flight. When like a royal Queen, stately and fair, The City of the West ascends the regal chair. A PROPHECY,* BY RETURN JONATHAN MEIGS. Enough of tributary praise is paid To virtue living or to merit, dead. To happier themes the rural muse invites, To calmest pleasures and serene delights. To us, glad fancy brightest prospects shows; Rejoicing nature all around us glows; Here late the savage, hid in ambush, lay, Or roamed the uncultured valleys for his prey; Here frowned the forest with terrific shade; No cultured fields exposed the opening glade; How changed the scene! See nature clothed in smiles

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    Publications, Volume XX

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), Title page

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

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    THE VIRGINIA MAGAZINE OF HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. VOL. XI. JANUARY, 1904. NO 3. MORAVIAN DIARIES OF TRAVELS THROUGH VIRGINIA. Edited by Rev. WILLIAM J. HINKE and CHARLES E. KEMPER. (CONTINUED.) REPORT AND OBSERVATIONS OF BRO. GOTTSCHALK* ON HIS JOURNEY THROUGH VIRGINIA AND MARYLAND, UNDERTAKEN IN MARCH AND APRIL, 1748. The places in Virginia, where Germans live, are the following: 1. BATTESSONS [PATTERSON'S] CREEK. The creek rises between the North and South Branch of the "Patomik" and empties into the South Branch.† On both * Matthias Gottlieb Gottschalk was a native of Arnswalde, Brandenburg. At the age of twenty-eight he entered the Theological Seminary at Lindheim, near Frankfort-on-the-Main. Came to Bethlehem in 1747. Labored as an itinerant missionary in Eastern Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia. Died at Bethlehem shortly after his return from this trip through Virginia, in August, 1748. See J. W. Jordan's Register of the Members of tke Moravian Church Who Emigrated from Europe to America Between 1734-1800. MS. in the library of the Pennsylvania Historical Society at Philadelphia. † This is an error. Patterson's creek flows into the North Branch of the Potomac about twelve miles below Cumberland, Maryland

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 56

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

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    sick people. We continued our journey for some distance over a poor road. Handrup became very weak owing to the heat. July 8th. Since we learned that we would not find a house to-day for thirty miles, but only mountains and bad roads, we took a man with us who conducted us over the mountains. It was a way the like of which I have not seen in America. In the evening we came to an Englishman6 with whom we stayed over night. July 9th. We crossed the North Branch this morning, and again saw no house for twelve miles. Then we met a German, at whose house we rested for a while. July 10th. Our host showed us the way over two high mountains. We came upon a large rattle snake, but it remained quiet till we had passed. In the afternoon we came to Bettessen's Creek [Patterson's Creek], where a large number of German settlers live. We tried to get something to eat, but found little bread. We comforted ourselves with the thought that our Saviour, in his hunger, ate the grain in the field. When we entered a certain house we found a woman who scolded much about the Herrnhuters7 [Moravians]. She said she would take care that she would not be led astray by them. When she heard that I was a minister, she asked whether I baptized children? She had a child which was not yet baptized. She brought me several books to show me her Christianity. We soon left, but asked that it be announced that I would preach on the following Sunday. We came to W. D. [William Degart], whom I asked whether I could preach in his stable, for the 6 Probably Thomas Cresap, with whom the missionaries usually stayed. See Schnell's Journal of 1749, Virginia Magazine, Vol. XI, p. 118. 7 In his Special Report, Schnell describes Patterson Creek as follows: "I visited a place called 'Betesscns Creek' [Patterson's Creek], where many German's live, interspersed among Low Dutch [Hollanders] and English New Lights. The High Germans are a poor people, internally as well as externally. I preached twice for them. They expressed a desire that I should come again. Several New Lights asked me to come to them. They were very friendly to me." 8 So called from one of their chief settlements at Herrnhut in Saxony. Here the Renewed Church of the Brethren was organized on June 17, 1722. Reichel, Early History, p. 3.

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