Thursday, 02 January 2014 07:30

Discussion #2

This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 481

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 481 [Click for larger image]Page 481

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 140

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 140 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 140

    On October 15, we started on our way at three o'clock. We had moonlight and a good road and about eighty miles to Frederickstown [Winchester]. But for twelve miles to "Shippestown", [Shippensburg]13 a little town, we had no water. Here we had our wagon fixed, because the tongue had been somewhat damaged. The blacksmith was very expensive, and the work was poorly done. We saw the Blue Mountains. about eight to ten miles to our right. We had exceptionally fine weather. Eight miles farther we came to the "Kanikatschik" [Conococheague], which is here about as large as the "Manakis" [Monocacy] at Bethlehem. Here we took our dinner. A few miles farther we stayed over night at Colonel Chimipersen's Mill,14 where we had good water. Bro. Nathanael conducted the evening worship. On October 16, Bro. Grube led the morning worship. At four o'clock we continued our journey. On the way we bought ten bushels of oats from an Irishman and after we had traveled five miles farther we breakfasted at a little creek, where Irish people have settled. Two miles farther we found good water. We traveled three miles to a house on the left, set back from the road a short distance. One mile farther we came to a tavern. We could see the Blue Mountains again very distinctly. After another mile we came to a German tavern. Here we bought some hay and took our dinner. Two miles this side of the tavern we passed the boundary of Pennsylvania and Maryland. We heard that Maryland is only six miles wide at this point. From the Susquehanna to this place mostly Irish people have settled. They have good land, but little or nothing can be bought of them. Two and a half miles farther on we came to an old Swiss settler from whom we bought some hay. He was very friendly and asked us to call again. One mile farther we came to a German, from whom we bought some cabbage, which came very handy to us. We continued for several miles and came to a place two miles this side bf the "Patomik," where we stayed 13 Shippensburg was laid out in 1749 by Edward Shippen. 14 The distance from Shippensburg proves this mill to have been Col. Chambers's mill at Chambersburg. See Scull's Map of Pennsylvania, 1759.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 390

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 390 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 390

    the afternoon at the "White Ploff," where several had agreed to stone me if I should undertake to preach. However, I paid no attention to them but went into the meeting house at the usual time. During the sermon they created considerable disturbance outside of the house, but I remained unmolested. After the sermon I visited Mr. Teus* and his wife. On the 16th, Mr. Barber, from the orphanage of Whitefield,† visited me. He invited me to come to the orphanage to visit him. On Sunday, the 19th, the minister from "Purisburg" administered the Lord's Supper to the Germans, at the court house [in Savannah]. The Germans of the white "Ploff," who liked me, came to the city to-day, with whom I held services in the afternoon. On the 21st, I traveled by water to Purisburg, spending the night with Mr. Ehrhard. On the next day I visited the Reformed minister there, named "Chiffeli."‡ He showed me his garden and plantation. When we returned to the house I asked him whether he would allow me to preach in his church. He said, * This is, perhaps, the German painter, Theus, who entertained Muhlenberg in Charlotte, S. C., from October 25, 1742, to November 12, 1742. See Muehlenberg's Autobiography, Allentown, 1881, pp. 115-117. According to Bernheim (History of the German Settlements and of the Lutheran Church in North and South Carotina, Philadelphia, 1872, p. 88), he was the brother of the Reformed minister, Christian Theus, who labored in Saxe Cotha, S. C., from 1739 to at least 1789. † The cornerstone of the Whitefield orphanage, at Savannah, was laid on March 25, 1740. When the building was completed, it received the name Bethesda. McClintock and Strong Cyclopædia, Vol. X, p. 983. ‡ Dalcho in his History of the P. E. Church in South Carolina, p. 386, mentions Rev. Henry Chiffelle as pastor in Purysburg. He was ordained by the Bishop of London, July 21, 1734. He is said to have come to South Carolina in 1744, and died in 1758. The date 1744 seems to be a misprint for 1734, because (1) this diary shows that he was already in South Carolina in January, 1744, his statements implying a long residence in this country. (2) Rev. Joseph Bugnion, his predecessor, died in 1734, and it is hardly likely that the S. P. G. should have left the congregation vacant ten years. (3) Rev. Chiffelle was ordained in 1734 for service in America, which implies his immediate departure for his field of labor. It is interesting to find him referred to as a Reformed minister in spite of his Episcopal ordination.

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