Thursday, 02 January 2014 07:30

Discussion #2

This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 317

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 317 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 317

    love-feast, in connection with the communion by bread and wine; and with these sacred rites is joined the service of feet-washing, following the example of Christ as outlined in St. John, 13th chapter. The Dunkers combat pride, and practice plainness of dress. They endeavor to avoid law suits, and teach peace in personal as well as national relations; they oppose secret, oath-bound societies, divorce, slavery and intemperance. At certain periods in their history they have opposed higher education; but the organizers of the sect were educated men, and at present they own and operate ten or a dozen colleges in the United States. For authentic accounts of the Dunkers in brief, I would refer the reader to (1) The New International Enclycopaedia (Dodd, Meade & Co.), Vol. VIII, pp. 273. 274; (2) The Schaff-Herzog Enclycopaedia of Re/igious Knowledge, Vol. IV, pp. 2401-2404. For similar accounts of the Sieben-Taeger, see the latter of the two references just given; also New Int. Encyc., Vol. II, pp. 459, 460. For authentic and complete accounts of the Dunkers, and in their connection, yet in their distinction, of the Sieben-Taeger, also see (1) The History of tile German Baptist Brethren, by George N. Falkenstein. Germantown, Penn.; (2) The History of the Brethrm, by Dr. M. G. Brumbaugh, published by the Brethren Publishing House, Elgin, Ill. JOHN WALTER WAYLAND. TOMB OF MRS. URSULA (BYRD) BEYER LEY. Some years prior to the Civil War the tomb of Usurla, daughter of William Byrd (1st) and wife of Robert Beverley, the historian, remained in the churchyard at Jamestown, almost intact. A visitor fortunately copied the epitaph and sent it to a newspaper. It is as follows: [Arms.] .. Here lyeth the body of Ursula Beverley late wife of Robert Beverley, daughter of ye Hon'ble Col. William Byrd, who departed this life the last day of October 1698, being much lamented of all that knew her. Aged 16 years, 11 months and 2 daies." During the years immediately preceding the war the tomb was mutilated, and about 1861 only a piece containing the arms was left. Dr. Frank Hall, a Confederate soldier, while doing sentry duty in the churchyard, made on July 1, 1861, a sketch of the fragment. We are indebted to Miss Jane Chapman Slaughter for the copy of the drawing published in this number of the Magazine, and for information of its existence.

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 466

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 466 [Click for larger image]Page 466

    EDITORIALANA. VOL. XX. No. 4. OCTOBER, 1911. GENERAL BRINKERHOFF. Elsewhere in this Quarterly we give notice of the death of General Brinkerhoff with an extended account of his busy and useful life and many of its prominent achievement's. But no written record of the life of such a man can adequately present what he really was to the world in which he lived. The in estimable outflow of a beautiful and true character, ever loyal to the highest ideals of life, cannot be recorded, cannot be duly valued, cannot in the fullest extent be appreciated. Back of all he did, broad and lasting as it may have been, is the man. Therein lay his power, his sway, over fellowmen. Sweet and gentle in disposition, ever courteous and urbane in manner, tenacious of his own convictions, when once formed, but tolerant of the views and beliefs of others, his life was a benign atmosphere, soothing and strengthening to all with whom he came in contact. He loved men, he loved children, he loved nature in all her varied forms, and buoyed by a hopeful and optimistic temperament, he rose above the petty annoyances of everyday experience and above the greater trials and disappointments in effort and ambition. He was ever a thoughtful and sincere student. All realms of knowledge attracted his receptive and capacious mind. He studied men and knew human nature. He read books and absorbed their contents. The problem of life was ever fresh and deeply interesting to him. The greater Query of the future was his constant meditation. He was unhampered by the dogmas of narrow sectarians, but he was steadfast in the belief of a divine and supreme intelligence and the adjustment in a better and unseen world of all that seemed wrong or awry in this. He had a deep sense of responsibility. Every duty that came to him was earnestly and painstakingly discharged. He sympathized with the distressed and the unfortunate. . It was ever his chosen task to help others by word or deed. Selfishness found no lodging in his makeup. Such men live the highest life in this world of flesh and blood and accomplish things for themselves and others, and the memory of such men is a lasting impetus to those who survive them. Through a period of nearly twenty years the present writer knew, admired and respected Roeliff Brinkerhoff. Many a delightful hour have we spent in his presence, an auditor to his rare and interesting reminiscences, a recipient of his helpful cheer and a beneficiary of the

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 483

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 483 [Click for larger image]Page 483

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