Thursday, 02 January 2014 07:30

Discussion #2

This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 274

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 274 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 274

    which we had bought. We had to drive again on a pretty steep road, after half a mile we came to a little creek, and again half a mile farther to the "Black Water," a large creek with steep banks. After another mile we came again to a creek; and two miles farther to another, where we ate our dinner. There were several mud holes here, but we passed them safely. There the road branched to the left up the mountain. We missed it, by turning to the right and coming to an old mill race at Ringfros Mill. We then stayed on the left and turned up again to the mountain, where we came to the right way. Going a mile we came to a little creek and mud hole. Half a mile beyond we came to another creek, a mile farther to the left was a new plantation, and half a mile from it we had to pass through a bad swamp and creek. A mile farther we came to Robert Johnsen, from whom we bought some hay. He accompanied us half a mile to show us the way across the creek and a comfortable place, where we could pitch our tent. Our course to-day was west and southwest. We had gone sixteen miles. The road was pretty good, except some mud holes and steep banks along the creeks. It was twenty-five miles from this point to the Smith River.4 On November 6, we continued our journey. Bro. Herman stayed back to thresh oats at Mr. Johnsen's place. We had to pass through many mud holes. Frequently there was danger of our wagon becoming stuck. We were often compelled to hoist the wheels out of the holes, and we had much trouble in cutting our way through, because it was very narrow. Frequently we hardly knew how to get through when turning our long wagon. Two miles from our camp we went through a fence. We had to pass through much mud and about thirty times over a creek, which runs through the great swamp. Bro. Herman also joined us again and brought with him several bushels of oats, which he had threshed out. Mr. Johnsen had a pleasant conversation with Bro. Herman. He said that he had not heard a sermon for nine years. In the evening we pitched our 4 This estimate is certainly too high, because the whole distance from Magotty creek to Smith river is not more than twenty-five miles. Johnson, Renfro, Rentfrow

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 378

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 378 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 378

    district thought of him. They answered: "Not very much." Rev. Mr. Rieger had said that he was a good Evangelical minister, who did not try to draw any one away from his religion, and that he preached the word pure and undefiled to all who wanted to hear him. They also told me that a man by the name of Matthew Hoffmann lives at Bethlehem, who had written several letters to his brother, living ten miles from there.* He had brought the letters to him [the schoolmaster] to read them to him, because he feared that his brother had fallen away froin the true religion. The schoolmaster had then read the letters, but liked them very well. In the evening I visited an elder, at whose place all his neighbors again came together, when they heard that I was there. I spoke to them of the death of the Lamb. On Monday, the 25th, before we left, five women came, who showed us much kindness. We then took leave, being very grateful. The schoolmaster, "Holzkloh," accompanied us part of the way, and gave me a letter to a Reformed elder in Carolina, to whom he recommended me most heartily. Taking leave he asked us urgently to come again and stay several weeks. We had nothing but rain all day, and passed a creek, which was dangerous becatise of its rocks and holes. A man happened to come along, who took us over. Shortly before we had already passed a river, called "Repehennik" [Rappahannock], in a canoe. In the evening we came to a German innkeeper, Kuefer Stopfel,† called Dutch Cooper. After a while, when he heard that I was a minister, he told of an English minister‡ living in the county, who receives 16,000 pounds of tobacco as his of the Church of the United Brethren, by L. T. Reichel, Nazareth, 1888, pp. 62-68. * This statement shows that the second Reformed colony, settled at the Little Fork of the Rappahannock, and visited by Gottschalk in 1748 (see Virginia Magazine, Vol. XI, p. 232), was already in existence in 1743. † As the Anglicised name shows, the correct name of this innkeeper must have been Christopher Kuefer. ‡ This was Rev. John Thompson (see this magazine, Vol. XI, p. 232). The German minister was Rev. George Samuel Klug (see this magazine, Vol. XI, pp: 230 and 240, f).

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 78

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 78 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 78

    mon has to be annouinced a few days beforehand from Catores [Codorus]. This can easily be done, because Br. Owen goes along. He can precede Bro. Joseph a few days. In Little Canawage, where Mr. Peizel resides, and to whom, accordinig to the resolution [of the Synod] §4, a visit has been promised; Mrs. Regnier has urgently requested Mr. Peizel that if the Brethren should come to him to let her know it, because she would like to speak with one of the Brethren. In Manakasy [Monocacy, Md.], are two places where we can preach. The usual place is at Mr. Weller's. Across the "Manakasy" a few German families live, about ten, who would perhaps like to hear a sermon. A man called Ellrod, whom I visited there, will be able to give more information. Captain Ogle and Jacob Weller are both very dear hosts of the Brethren. It would perhaps be a blessing to Mr. Weller's house if Bro. Joseph would lodge there occasionally. In Kanigetschik [Conococheague, Md.], which is situated 28 miles from Capt. Ogle's, across the Little Blue Mountains, to-wards the north west, Jonathan Haeger is our dear host. The house of his brother, who lives nearby, is our English and German pulpit. If Bro. Joseph could so arrange it as to be there on Thursday, the sermon could very well be appointed for the following Sunday. The last time I was there I preached two German sermons, one in the forenoon and the other in the afternoon, with an open and full heart, to a large crowd. One of the elders promised me that, if I should come back, I might preach in their church. Immediately beyond the blue mountains, before coming to Jonathan Haeger's, perhaps eight or ten miles before, a German man lives by the name of Gottfried Mang, the son-in-law of the old Mr. Geffer(s)on (?), at Lancaster. Not far from there lives the son-in-law of the dear, old father Lischer. If Bro. Joseph leaves Capt. Ogle's house early Wednesday morning and rests during tile hottest part of the day, be can be at Gottfried Mang's house in good time and stay there over night. This will be very acceptable to those people, because they asked me to rend the Brethren to them. On the following Thursday, he [Bro. Joseph] can be in good time in "Kanigotschik" at Jonathan Haeger's. If Bro. Joseph desires to have his passport signed, before

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