Thursday, 02 January 2014 07:30

Discussion #2

This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

Published in Research Blog

Recently Added

  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 373

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 373 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 373

    lodged in an English tavern. Here the people complained very much, because they had no better preacher than the one ministering to them at present. On account of his disorderly life he he has no influence among the people. At this place I handed to the landlady the Swedish catechisms,* which Bro. Bryzeliust† of Philadelphia, gave me for his countrymen, who live three miles from here. On the 19th, we went to Roger Turner, who married the sister of Bro. Evans, and lives ten miles from here. They were very glad to see us. They urged me to give them a sermon, but my deficiency in the English language prevented me from doing it. We stayed with them a day and a night. When we departed they asked us very urgently to come again. I was here requested to baptize the child of an Englishman, nine months old, but I refused. On the 20th we continued our journey. Roger Turner accompanied us part of the way and showed us the right road. They gave us some Indian corn bread and cheese for the journey, although they were poor. At sunset we came to a German innkeeper, Jost Hayd,† a rich man, well known in this region. it seems to follow that he still occupied, in 1743, his first place of settlement on the Opequon, where the road passes the creek at Bartonsville. In 1748, he had removed to the Cedar Creek. See this magazine, Vol. XI, p. 228. * This Swedish catechism was a translation of the English catechism, mentioned before. It was translated into Swedish by Olaf Malander. See John Bechtel; His Contributions to Literature and His Descendants. By John W. Jordan. Philadeiphia, 1895. It is commonly thought that this catechism was actually composed by John Bechtel. But this view is erroneous. In the Bethlehem Diary we find the following entry, under date July 1, 1742: 'Bro Andrew Eschenbach and Gottlieb Buettner read from the Catechisnm for the Reformed congregations, which was written by Bro. Ludwig [Zinzendorf] and edited by Bro. John Bechtel." This statement settles definitely the authorship of the book. In fact, the title does not claim more than that Bechtel was the editor. ‡ "Paul Daniel Pryzelius" was ordained by the Moravians in 1743. He labored among the Swedes in West Jersey. See Register of the Moravians, p. 50. ‡ Just Hite, who was mentioned by Rev. Mr. Gottschalk in his Re-port and Observations, published in the January number, 1904, of this

    Be the first to comment! Read 629 times
  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 372

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 372 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 372

    the inkeeper is Adam Forny. He complained much about ministers and their useless efforts. On the 16th we started early. We had no house for twenty-five miles. We passed from Pennsylvania to Maryland. We had to wade through three small rivers. At the first we were fortunate enough to meet a man, just as we had undressed to go across. He took us over on his horse. The name of the first two rivers is " Pfeiff" [Pipe] Creek. The third is called "Manakes " [Monocacy],* through which I [Leonhard Schnell] had to carry my companion, because he was very tired, for we had already walked forty miles. A mile farther we found a house, where the people at first refused to receive us, but finally yielded to our requests. The host was a Mennonite and his name is Abraham Mueller. On Sunday, the 17th, we hurried to the father-in-law of Bro. Klemf, of Philadelphia. He received us very willingly and was glad over our visit. They invited the people and I preached to them a sermon in the afternoon. Very many Germans live in this neighborhood, Lutheran and Reformed people. The Lutherans have church services every three weeks. (N. B. A certain Schulze, who pretends to have been ordained by Bro. Ludwig [Zinzendorf ], preaches in this district). The Reformed people also desire to have a minister. I felt very happy among them. They are very plain people. On the 18th, we had to cross several high mountains and deep valleys. We found only two houses within twenty miles, where we could get nothing to eat, because the people themselves had no bread. Towards evening we came to the "Patomik" [Potomac] River, which separates Maryland from Virginia.† We * Monocacy was visited again on March 8-9, 1746, by Christian Henry Rauch, another Moravian missionary, who states in his diary that he preached in the church at Monocacy. This proves that a Reformed congregation was already in existence before it was visited and fully organized by Rev. Michael Schiatter, on May 8, 1747. See Life of Rev. Michael Schiatler, p 154. † The road which the missionaries followed from York, Pa., can best be seen on Fry and Jefferson's map of Virginia, 1751. It is there called " The Great Waggon Road " from Philadelphia. It crossed the Potomac at Williams' Ferry. From the fact that Jost Hayd was first visited,.

    Be the first to comment! Read 706 times
  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 371

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 371 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 371

    called on Jacob Mueller, who married the sister of Bro. Suessholz. But I found that I was not as welcome as formerly. Hence I left and went to William Ziegler, who moved to this place from Philadelphia. He received us kindly and showed us much love. On the 14th, we crossed the Susquehanna River. John Ride took us over. When it became dark we could find no house. But we heard a dog bark. We followed the sound, but soon found ourselves in a swamp. We extricated ourselves with much difficulty. The people whom we met were Germans. They gave us a lodging at our request. On the 15th, we came to the little town, New York [York, in York Co., Pa.], where all the inhabitants are High Germans. The name of the innkeeper, with whom we took breakfast, is George Schwab. In answer to a number of questions, he said: "You are certainly Zinzendorfians." I answered: "I do not understand your meaning. I am a Lutheran minister, but no Zinzendorfian." He said: "You are going about everywhere through the country to preach, will you not give us a sermon, for we have long wished to hear one of you?" As I did not refuse, they immediately went about through the little town, from house to house, and announced a serrnon. I preached to them soon afterwards on the text: "The Son of Man is come to seek and to save that which is lost." They asked me to come again to them. Only every four weeks a Lutheran minister* comes to them and preaches for them. A shoemaker, who is single, asked me whether he should go on a privateer ship. The Catholic minister had advised him to do so. I made use of the opportunity to speak to his heart. Towards evening we came to the district which is called after the river "Canawage " [Conewago, Adams Co., Pa.]. We lodged in an inn. The name of * The first trace of a Lutheran congregation at York appears in the year 1733. Its first pastor was John Caspar Stoever. In 1743 the congregation was served by David Candler. See Hallesche Nachrichten, new ed., Vol. I., pp. 563-565. The Reformed congregation goes back to the year 1744. In that year a call was extended to the Rev. Jacob Lischy, who settled in York in September, 1745. See Fathers of the Reformed Church, Vol. I, p. 354.

    Be the first to comment! Read 697 times