Thursday, 02 January 2014 07:30

Discussion #2

This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

Published in Research Blog
Monday, 30 December 2013 07:15

Discussion #1

Today’s blog, the first in a series that will hopefully be an on-going explanation of what I am presently working on, is about the various Brethren Miller families who were early settlers of Montgomery county, Ohio.  The opening section below is some comments about the Miller families of note, followed by what I am working on at this time.  In essence there are three Miller families that interest me, and I am not even remotely related to any of them, so, to that end, here goes.

Published in Research Blog

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  • Discussion #2

    This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 147

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 147 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 147

    settled by Irish28 and English people. Immediately behind "Augusti Court House" the bad road begins. (There are two roads here, the one to the right goes to Carolina.) The road ran up and down continually, and we had either to push the wagon or keep it back with ropes which we had fastened to the rear. There was no lack of water, for every two miles we met creeks. We pitched our tent eight miles this side of "Augusti Courthouse," close to a spring and an old dilapidated house. Bro. Loesch went to several plantations to buy feed for our horses. But the people had none themselves. However, they were very friendly and regretted that they could not help us. On October 25, we continued our journey. After having gone half a mile we found two roads. We took the one to the left. We had no water for five miles. A mile farther we breakfasted. Then we rode six miles and ate dinner at a beautiful spring. We met two Sabbatarians [Siebentaeger]29 who had been in Carolina 28The missionaries in this diary invariably refer to the Scotch-Irish settlers as Irish, which is clearly an error. The history of the Scotch-Irish in Virginia has been so admirably written by Mr. Joseph A. Waddell in his Annals of Augusta County that further reference to them is unnecessary. 29 These Sabbatarians were evidently members of the Ephrata colony at the New river. (See Virginia Magazine, Vol. XI, 125, 234.) An interesting visit to this settlement is described by Dr. Thomas Walker in his Journal of an Expedition in the Spring of the Year 1750 Boston, 1888. On March 16, 1750, he writes: "We kept up the Staunton to William Englishes [near Blacksburg, Montgomery Co., Va.] He lives on a small branch, and was not much hurt by the Fresh. He has a mill which is the furthest back except one lately built by the sect of people, who call themselves the Brotherhood of Euphrates [Ephrata] and are commonly called Dunkards, who are the upper inhabitants on the New River, which is about 400 yards wide at their place. They live on the west side and we were obliged to swim our Horses over. The Dunkards are an odd people who make it a matter of Religion not to shave their Beards, ly on Beds, or eat Flesh, though at present, in the last they transgress, being constrained to it, as they say, by the want of a sufficiency of Grain & Roots, they having not long been seated here. I doubt the plenty and deliciousness of Venison & Turkeys has contributed not a little to this. The unmarried have no private Property, but live on a common Stock. They don't baptize either young or old, they keep their Sabbath on Saturday, and

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 242

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 242 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 242

    On Sunday, July 31st, Bro. Joseph preached in the forenoon in their church, and Bro. Reuz in the afternoon. Afterwards several nice and intelligent men visited Bro. Joseph. He then had an opportuuity to speak to them of the Saviour, and give them a correct idea of the congregation [at Bethlehem], because Lischy's "Declaration,"* had been circulated there. On August 1st, they continued their journey towards the "Potomack," but they lost their way and had to follow the compass northeast over hills and valleys. When night set in they were compelled to camp in the forest. On the next day they continued their former course till they found the right way, and finally came to a large plantation. But they could get nothing to satisfy their hunger, for there are very unkind people down there in Virginia. Without supper, breakfast and dinner, they continued till they reached a public house on the Goose creek, where they were able to satisfy their hunger and thirst. After resting a few hours, they again started out and traveled till 11 o'clock at night, when they came to the "Potomack," where they lodged with the ferryman. ORDERLY BOOK AND JOURNAL OF JAMES NEWELL† DURING THE POINT PLEASANT CAMPAIGN, 1774. (From the Draper Collection, Wisconsin Historical Society.) (Virginia MSS., XI.) A Copy of a Journal kept by Capt. James Newell of the expedition to Point Pleasant in the year 1774. A portion of this Weaver, one of the original Germanna colonists, in 1721, is still standing near Midland Station, Fauquier county, Virginia, and it is believed that this was the year of their removal from Gennanna to Germantown. * A publication of a former Moravian, but after 1747 a Reformed minister. See facsimile of title page in Dr. Dubbs's German Reformed Church in Pennsylvania, Lancaster, 1902, p. 126. †t We are indebted to Mr. John P. Kennedy, the newly-elected State Librarian of Virginia, for the copy of Newell's orderly book and joumal

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