Thursday, 02 January 2014 07:30

Discussion #2

This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

Published in Research Blog
Monday, 30 December 2013 07:15

Discussion #1

Today’s blog, the first in a series that will hopefully be an on-going explanation of what I am presently working on, is about the various Brethren Miller families who were early settlers of Montgomery county, Ohio.  The opening section below is some comments about the Miller families of note, followed by what I am working on at this time.  In essence there are three Miller families that interest me, and I am not even remotely related to any of them, so, to that end, here goes.

Published in Research Blog

Recently Added

  • About

    This series of images are courtesy of JStor and meet their copyrights as covered under Terms and Conditions of Use for Early Journal Content.  The images herein displayed come from various articles published in The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography published in 1903, 1904 and 1905.  For specific volume and issue number see each series herein represented.  Each image was OCRed and the resultant text placed within a hidden HTML element, facilitating the search engine of this site.

    This series of images represents the translations, in part, from the German to English of several diaries of Moravian missionaries of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania during their travels through Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia.  They are a wealthy of knowledge for German Baptist Brethren historians and researchers and are thus brought together for the first time.  Assuredly a debt of gratitude is owed to Rev. William J. Hinke and Charles E. Kemper.

    Note:  though the last image in this series states that the series was to be continued, it never was.  A search thru 1912 of The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography failed to locate the continuation.

    Be the first to comment! Read 1087 times
  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 479

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 479 [Click for larger image]Page 479

    Be the first to comment! Read 3176 times
  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 151

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 151 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 151

    drove two miles farther over a good road, passed a creek and came to a house where we stopped most of the day. The people baked some bread for us and we bought a pig which we butchered at once. Mr. Illisen also came to us, from whom Bro. Herman bought the last corn. He asked the brethren to shoe his horse, which they did. He also said that he intended to travel to Philadelphia within a short time and that if we had anything to deliver he would gladly take it along. Bro. Gottlob and Nathanael wrote several letters to our dear brethren at Bethlehem, which they addressed to Sam. Powel in Philadelphia. This evening we went on four miles farther, but had a pretty good road. We took several loaves of bread along which had been baked for us at Lunis' Mill.35 We crossed a pretty large creek and pitched our tent two miles this side of the mill at a little creek, but we had to change its position soon, because the wind blew the smoke into the tent. We put our horses in the woods. Bro. Petersen and Merkli, who had stayed back to bake bread, came to us again late at night. They had been compelled at Lunis Mill to wade through the creek, which is pretty deep. On October 30, we had bad weather. It rained and snowed, but we kept pretty dry under our tent. Our horses had run off and some of our brethren had to search for them nearly the whole day before they found them. We were very glad when we had them again, because we had heard that many horses had been stolen in this neighborhood and the same might have happened to ours. As the brethren had become thoroughly wet and cold, we drank tea and were very happy together. We changed our tent again because of the smoke. We tried for the first time to bake our bread in the ashes. On October 31, we rose very early to start again on our journey. We soon had to climb a high mountain, which was very hard on the horses, for the ground was frozen hard and covered with snow. After a mile we came to a little creek, and after another mile to a pretty large creek, near which was a plantation. 35 This was evidently the mill of Robert Luhny, who is mentioned in the itinerary of Rev. Mr. Schnell as being on the James river. The reading which was considered doubtful (see Virginia Magazine, Vol. XII, p. 82) is corroborated by this passage. The ferry is given as "Looneys Ferry," on Fry and Jefferson's map of Virginia.

    Be the first to comment! Read 722 times