Thursday, 02 January 2014 07:30

Discussion #2

This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

Published in Research Blog
Monday, 30 December 2013 07:15

Discussion #1

Today’s blog, the first in a series that will hopefully be an on-going explanation of what I am presently working on, is about the various Brethren Miller families who were early settlers of Montgomery county, Ohio.  The opening section below is some comments about the Miller families of note, followed by what I am working on at this time.  In essence there are three Miller families that interest me, and I am not even remotely related to any of them, so, to that end, here goes.

Published in Research Blog

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 59

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 59 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 59

    July 19th. Sunday. Many people assembled, to whom I preached. The power of God and of the blood of Christ was felt among the hearers. Soon afterwards we bade farewell to our host, who had entertained us very kindly for four days. They wished us much success and blessing on our journey, asking us, if we should again come to their neighborhood, to visit them by all means. We would be welcome day or night. After wishing the Lord's peace upon them, we left them and traveled eight miles farther. July 20th. We started early on our way. We found no house for twelve miles, but met a large rattle snake, which barred our way, makiiig much noise. But wvhen we approached, it could not harm us, for the Lord protected us. Soon we met another one, which fled before us. We could not thank the Saviour enough for his gracious protection. At noon we stopped with an Englishman. He complained that for two years he had heard no sermon, although he had been compelled every year to pay the county minister. I had an opportunity of speaking with him about the assurance of faith. In the afternoon we again met no house for ten miles, but we struck high mountains12 and hot weather. In the evening we came to a house where it looked pretty bad, internally as well as externially, but the people were very jolly. July 21st. After marching twelve miles, we found a house and hoped to secure a breakfast, but as nobody lived in the house, a biscuit which I had carried about for fourteen days did good service. This we ate, while resting at a creek, and drank water to our heart's content. We traveled again six miles, when we found another plantation, butt the people told us they had just eaten the last bit of bread. Hence we stayed till the woman had baked some bread for us. Then we continued, wading through the North River [North Branch of Shenandoah]. We stayed over night with an Irishman. July 22nd. Leonhard [Schnell] had a bad attack of fever, which 12 The missionaries were crossing the North Moutntain, to get into the Shenandoah Valley.

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  • Front cover (inside)

    Minutes of the Annual Meetings of the Brethren: 1778 - 1917

    Front cover (inside) — Minutes of the Annual Meetings of the Brethren [Click for larger image]Front cover (inside)

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 283

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 283 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 283

    Raccoon Ford, and about fifteen miles up the river from Germanna. This was the "Black Walnut Run" or "Second Rappehennik River" site. Prior to 1751 it was removed to its present site. Fry and Jefferson's map, 1754-5, locates the "old court house" near Sommerville's Ford, and "court house" at the present town of Orange. The editors are indebted to W. W. Scott, Esq., State Law Librarian, Richmond, Va., for information bearing upon this question. Idem, p. 381, note. See Col. Wm. Byrd's petition dated June 11, 1735, in Palmer's Calendar of Virginiia State Papers, Vol. 1, p. 223, praying for a grant of one hundred thousand acres of land on the south branch of the Roanoke river, upon which he proposed to settle "Switzers and other foreign Protestants." The German book of Colonel Byrd was printed in 1737, according to information from the librarian of the John Carter Brown Library. Vol. XII, p. 56. The German mentioned under date July 9th was most probably Oliver Kraemer. See Magazine XII, 80. Idem, p. 75, note 35, I, 5. Instead of "lived in retirement at Siegen," read: near Siegen. idem, p. 75, note 35, I, 13. The will of Henry Haeger was not probated in 1733, but in 1737, as appears clearly from a photograph since taken of the record. Idem, p. 141, note 15. Read Heckemoelder, instead of Neckemoelder. Idem, p. 145. The tavern keeper, Severe, mentioned in text, was Valentine Sevier. He was the father of Gen. John Sevier, one of the heroes of King's Mountain, and the first Governor of Tennessee. Waddell states in his Annals (Ed. 1902, pp. 325-6) that Valentine Sevier in 1753 conveyed to Andrew Bird land which lay between Limestone Ridge and Smith's Creek, which section is now in Rockingham, but was then within the limits of Agus-

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