Thursday, 02 January 2014 07:30

Discussion #2

This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

Published in Research Blog
Monday, 30 December 2013 07:15

Discussion #1

Today’s blog, the first in a series that will hopefully be an on-going explanation of what I am presently working on, is about the various Brethren Miller families who were early settlers of Montgomery county, Ohio.  The opening section below is some comments about the Miller families of note, followed by what I am working on at this time.  In essence there are three Miller families that interest me, and I am not even remotely related to any of them, so, to that end, here goes.

Published in Research Blog

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 239

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 239 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 239

    line. For an hour and a half they climbed the very steep ascent, but when they reached the top they surveyed in every direction an exceedingly wide region, and it seemed to them as if the whole earth were at their feet.* On account of its remarkable height, they called the mountain "Fuersten Spitz" [Prince Peak]. In passing over the top and in their descent they spent four full hours. As it was evening and they missed the road, they happened to strike an "elk trail," which took them between two mountains.† Here they passed the night, hungry and thirsty, encamped at their fire. They were frequently visited by the elks, which are numerous in those mountains. On the following morning, July 26th, they came to a marked path. It brought them to a salt lick, which is frequented by the elks and where they are usually shot by the hunters. A kind spirit led them to the right way, by which they continued their journey, till they came in the evening to a German plantation. Here Adam Roeder‡ lives, whose mother, eighty-six years of age, lives at Makuntsche [Macungie, now Emmaus, Lehigh county, Pa.], and belongs to that congregation. * The region seen by the missionaries from the top of "Fuersten Spitz" is now comprised in the counties of Augusta, Rockingham and Shenandoah. † This was probably Brock's Gap, one of the most important passes through the North Mountain. ‡ Adam Rader. The missionaries were now in the vicinity of Timberville, Rockingham county, Va. About one mile west of this place stands Rader's Church, which is known to be one of the oldest places of worship in Rockingham, although the date of the organization of the congregation cannot be given definitely. The first reference to the Reformed congregation worshipping in Rader's Church is found in the diary of Rev. Charles Lange, pastor at Frederick, Md, who visited the congregation on April 17, 1768. See Fathers of the Reformed Church, Vol. II, p. 154. From the beginning until 1879 it was used jointly by the German Reformed and Lutheran denominations. In that year a new church was built by the Lutherans for their sole use, the German Reformed congregation shortly afterwards erecting a church at Timberville.

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  • The History… of the Potsdam Congregation, Page 10

    The History of the Potsdam Congregation
    of the Church of the Brethren

    Page 10— The History… of the Potsdam Congregation [Click for larger image] title=Page 10

    with the Englewood Dunkard Brethren Church. The remaining ministers were all well into their twilight years, soon there after passing. In 1949 it was decided in a congregational council meeting to secure a full time paid pastor. Work began that year by cutting trees from the church woods to use in the construction of the church parsonage. On September 1, 1950, L. John Weaver became our first pastor. With his resignation, Harley H. Helman served a year as interim pastor until 1964 when A. Butler Sizemore became the second pastor. He was followed in 1972 by Robert P. Fryman. Twenty five years ago, in 1979 the newly graduated Bethany Seminary student Robert W. Kurtz became our fourth and currant pastor. He has been assisted by Arthur A. Boston 1987-1994 and since 1996 by Alvin C. Cook as associate pastors. In 2002, Craig Brown became our first youth pastor. The wives of these ministers, Flora Weaver, Cora Helman, Norma Sizemore, Waneta Fryman, Jeannie Kurtz, Helen Boston, Phil Cook and Janey Brown have all added richly to the lives of our church family. Members of our Church Who Have Receiveda Callto the Ministry Joseph and Henry C. Longanecker were identical twin born in 1848 on the north edge of New Lebanon to deacon Benjamin Longanecker and his first wife Rebecca Welbaum. They with their wives were baptized at Georgetown in 1870, the year following their marriages, but soon moved away. Both were elected to the ministry in 1882, Joseph in the Union City IN church and Henry in the Berthold ND church. At the time of Henry’s death in 1920, they were the oldest twin ministers in the Church of the Brethren. These brothers served our Lord and Master an aggregate of eighty three years. Lester Heisey was baptized in 1898 at Potsdam and called to the ministry 17 Sep 1908 by the West Milton Church of the Brethren. From 1909-1914 he served the Charleston church near Chillicothe OH, 1914-1915 Price’s Creek church near Eaton OH, 1916-1919 Richland church near Mansfield OH, 1919-1930 Georgetown church and 1931-1932 the Pleasant Valley church near Union City OH. The Rock House Church of the Brethren in KY was made a separate congregation from its parent Wolfe Creek church 2 Sep 1932 with Lester answering the call to be its first pastor, serving until 1939. The town of Heisey KY was named in his honor. He commuted to his charge in KY while remaining a resident of Potsdam where he was ordained to the Eldership in 1942. He was an evangelist and missionary in addition to his service through the years in the free ministry. Foster L. Myers was elected to the ministry in 1938, serving our congregation through 1941 when he attended Bethany Seminary and was ordained by the First

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 109

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 109 [Click for larger image]Page 109

    FOUR CYCLES: A CENTENNIAL ODE. Prepared in commemoration of the centennial anniversary of Pickaway County The Poem is descriptive of Circleville, the county seat. MAY LOWE. PRELUDE. The grape vine and the sycamore Cast shadows long and deep, On the surface of the river Near whose banks the thousands sleep — Men of mystery, who from silence Of the dim past settled here, Wrought their mighty deeds of valor, Left a record written clear Of their learning and their prowess, In the circle and the square; Left a name for future builders, In the circle and the square.

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