Thursday, 02 January 2014 07:30

Discussion #2

This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

Published in Research Blog
Monday, 30 December 2013 07:15

Discussion #1

Today’s blog, the first in a series that will hopefully be an on-going explanation of what I am presently working on, is about the various Brethren Miller families who were early settlers of Montgomery county, Ohio.  The opening section below is some comments about the Miller families of note, followed by what I am working on at this time.  In essence there are three Miller families that interest me, and I am not even remotely related to any of them, so, to that end, here goes.

Published in Research Blog

Recently Added

  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 139

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 139 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 139

    on the "Catores" is estimated at thirty miles. It was getting somewhat difficult for our horses and the brethren had to help by pushing the wagon. Otherwise we had a right good road, which is a great blessing. Several miles this side of [beyond] the Susquehanna we took dinner at a tavern, where there is good water. The people took Bro. Gottlob for a clergyman. It began to rain, but did not continue long. Five miles this side of the tavern we came to a creek and eight miles further, towards evening, we came to another creek. We pitched our tent for the first time, because a severe thunder storm was coming. Under the tent we kept pretty dry and the brethren slept for a little while. When the storn was over, we started at twelve o'clock midnight and traveled several miles farther to the next creek. We passed a little town, called "Carl Isles" [Carlisle],11 consisting of about 60 houses and inhabited mostly by Irishmen. On Sunday, October 14, about 4 o'clock in the morning, we pitched our tent four miles this side of [beyond] "Carl Isles", in order not to be an eyesore to the Irish Presbyterians. We lay down for several hours and slept well and peacefully. After breakfast the brethren were shaved. The rest of the time we spent happily in oujr tent. At noon we ate pork and dumplings. In the afternoon the people from Jersey came to us, who had lately been in Bethlehem and had advised us to take this road. They had broken their wagon in the Susquehanna, which had delayed them several days in their journey. They were very friendly and would have liked to stay with us. Towards evening we went three miles farther to the widow Tennent's tavern. This night we stayed on the other side of the creek. Several people came to us, who lodged in the tavern, to see what kind of people we were. We inquired of them about the way. They weie very obliging towards us. One of them had been in the Moravian orphanage in his youth, and was by birth a Silesian.12 Another was the son of the commissioner at Sakana, [Saucon, Lehigh Co.] He resides in Frederickstown [Winchester], Virginia. We slept to-day without using the tent. 11 The town of Carlisle was laid out in 1751. See C. W. Wing, History of Cumberland County, p. 229. 12 He was a native of the Prussian province of Silesia, which was acquired by Frederick II, in 1745, for Prussia.

    Be the first to comment! Read 720 times
  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 386

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 386 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 386

    written several names of Brethren. I afterwards learned in Georgia that Leonhard intended to go to Bethlehem. On December 22nd, we did not go very far, because it rained, but we came to the "Winiar River" [Winyah Bay], which is three miles wide. They refused to take us over, saying the wind was contrary. Hence we nad to wait. On the following day we had to wait again till ten o'clock for the tide. We passed half a mile from Georgetown, which is situated between two rivers. Then we journeyed fifteen miles before we found a house where we could lodge. But it became dark before we could reach it. We lost our way. When we called they answered us from an inn a mile away. We went to this place and stayed there over night. On December 24th, we were early taken across the " Sandy" [Santee] River, and after a mile we passed over the other arm of this river. We had nice weather and a fairly good road, hence we hastened to reach "Charlestown " [Charleston] before night. But we were unable to make it. We stayed, therefore, over night with a Scotchman, named Bruce. We had to go to this house, because the house before was full of negroes, who would not receive us. Bruce at first objected, but finally yielded and showed us much kindness. He discussed the Scriptures with us, which he knew very well. On December 25th, after having been taken across the "Copper " [Cooper] River, we came safely to Charlestown [Charleston]. We asked for Mr. Brunet, for whom we had a letter. He received us very kindly. He related to us the pitiable circumstances of the ministers and people there, and what evil reports they circulated about the count [Zinzendorf] and the Moravians, of which the libellous book of Gilbert Tennant* is the main cause. I inquired after Germans, but when I heard that only very few live in the city, I resolved to leave "Charlestown" on the following day. *This is probably the book entitled: "The Necessity of Holding Fast the Truth, represented in Three Sermons on Rev. III, 3. Preached at New York, April, 1742, with an Appendix, Relating to Errors lately vented by some Moravians in those parts. By Gilbert Tennent, M. A. Boston, 1743."

    Be the first to comment! Read 751 times
  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 272

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 272 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 272

    whom we met whether we could cross the mountain to-day. He said: Yes, and told us that some one was living on the mountain with whom we could have an opportunity to stay over night. We believed it and drove to the mountain, but had to pass a large creek1 on the way. Then we tried whether we could ascend the mountain, but it was inmpossible because the foot of the mountain was too steep. We concluded therefore to unload and carry our baggage [on horseback] up on the mountain. Bro. Lischer and Pfeil stayed with the wagon, the rest went up the mountain. Wheni we had covered half of the way it began to rain. It was also difficult for our horses, but we hoped to find the house on top of the mountain, of which the man had spoken. It took us a long time to ascend and when we finally reached the top no house nor water could be found. We were therefore compelled also to descend the mountain, although it was very dark and rained fast. Finally after many vain wishes we reached a little creek in the valley. It had taken us two and a half hours to cross this mountain.2 We then camped, as well as we could, but experienced much difficulty in starting a fire, for it rained very fast and everything was wet. We raised our tent and lay down upon the wet blankets. Here we rested for a while. To-wards morning it cleared and became very cold. On November 3, we went very early back across the mountain to get the rest of the baggage and the wagon. Bro. Gottlob, Nathanael and Kalberland meanwhile stayed with the tent. The brethren who had remained with the wagon also had had a cold night, and we were glad to see them again. We put our baggage once more on our horses and then carried most of our things to the top of the mountain. Here we made a fire and Bro. Haberland staved there. The rest of the brethren went back again to bring up the wagon, which was pretty empty. But we had to push very hard to get the wagon up. After an hour and a half we reached the top safely. After we had loaded the wagon again we drove up hill for a short distance. 1 This large creek is probably Back creek, which is due south of the Roanoke River. 2 This mountain, which gave the Moravian travelers so much trouble, was no doubt the Blue Ridge, which they crossed at Magotty Gap.

    Be the first to comment! Read 686 times