Thursday, 02 January 2014 07:30

Discussion #2

This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

Published in Research Blog
Monday, 30 December 2013 07:15

Discussion #1

Today’s blog, the first in a series that will hopefully be an on-going explanation of what I am presently working on, is about the various Brethren Miller families who were early settlers of Montgomery county, Ohio.  The opening section below is some comments about the Miller families of note, followed by what I am working on at this time.  In essence there are three Miller families that interest me, and I am not even remotely related to any of them, so, to that end, here goes.

Published in Research Blog

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 116

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 116 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 116

    having commended our friends. Bro. Rosen and wife [the Moravian missionary at Monocacy, Md.], to the protection of the Lamb.* Towards noon we visited Frederick Ohnsell, who loves the Brethren, although he has had no intercourse with them. From there we went to an old man at Fredericktown [Md.] who was very kind. Towards evening we came to George Gumpf, with whom also Jacob Weller and his wife, and Adam Gamb were staying. In the evening I conducted a song service, at which several new comers were present. I also baptized, at the same time, the little daughter of Bro. Gumpf, Dorothea. We felt at home in this house. On October 27th, we continued our journey over the Canagetschick [Conococheague] Mountains, and the Antidum [Antietam] River, and came to Jonathan Haeger [the founder of Hagerstown, Md.] who received us very kindly with a kiss. We passed the night with a Swiss, Peter Reusch. who received us well. On October 28th, we went to Haeger's. where we passed the Sabbath quietly.† On Sunday, October 29th, I preached on the "Canagetschick," in Haeger's house, with a feeling of blessing. After the sermon we traveled a little farther, and a smith, Hackemeyer, took us on horses through the "Canegetshick." We stayed over night with Henry Wehr, a countryman of Bro. Gottschalk.‡ We slept near the fire, passing the night uncomfortably. It is a poor family. the "Congregation of God in the Spirit," on May 13, 1745. Preached in Allemaengel, Swatara, and Donegal, Pennsylvania. Sent as evangelist to the Walloons in New York and to the Germans in Virginia. Teacher at Friedensthal, near Nazareth, 1758-1768. In his later life he engaged also in printing. Several books with his imprint are in the archives at Bethlehem. Accidently drowned in a mill race on August 16, 1777. * A favorite Moravian term for Christ. † The Moravians observed at first both the Jewish Sabbath and the Christian Sunday. ‡ Another Moravian Missionary, of whom a diary will be presented later,

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 48

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
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    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 48 [Click for larger image]Page 48

    A VANISHING RACE. MRS. JENNIE C. MORTON. Frankfort, Ky. Read by the author before the Ohio Valley Historical Association, at their meeting with the Kentucky State Historical Society in the New Capitol, October 16th, 1909. Whether we call the Indian, North American or South American, we know the Indian race historically as a peculiar and distinctly marked people—disappearing gradually into oblivion. An authentic history of the race has not been written, but the traditions concerning it, tinged with probability, is that the race is descended from those fierce and terrible Asiatics, the Tartars. The pathways of the Indian, unlike any other nation of equal intelligence wandering down through the ages, are reddened with the blood of the slain, or they are smoking with human sacrifices, to gratify their horrible thirst for capture or revenge, and barbaric amusement. Students of Ethnology are agreed upon the origin of the Indian as a branch of the Asiatic people we have mentioned, because of the resemblance of some tribes on our Continent, to the Japanese in cast of feature; but the stern and forbidding statures and smileless faces of the Indian limit the resemblance, if indeed it exists. This article is not written to reproduce in history an account of the revolting habits, customs, manners, arts and language of this strange race. Only that which arrests the attention now of civilized people in their efforts to train, control, civilize and educate it, should be dwelt upon. However senseless to us—their arts and their ideas. Their weird and wonderful fables-yet they are above our contempt. and beyond our ridicule, these brown simoons of humanity—the Indians. They have been driven from every country and every

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  • Some Who Led, Front cover (inside)

    Some Who Led — Or — Fathers in
    the Church of the Brethren Who Have Passed Over

    Page Front cover (inside) — Some Who Led [Click for larger image]Front cover (inside)

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