Thursday, 02 January 2014 07:30

Discussion #2

This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

Published in Research Blog
Monday, 30 December 2013 07:15

Discussion #1

Today’s blog, the first in a series that will hopefully be an on-going explanation of what I am presently working on, is about the various Brethren Miller families who were early settlers of Montgomery county, Ohio.  The opening section below is some comments about the Miller families of note, followed by what I am working on at this time.  In essence there are three Miller families that interest me, and I am not even remotely related to any of them, so, to that end, here goes.

Published in Research Blog

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 235

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 235 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 235

    EXTRACTS FROM THE DIARY OF THE JOURNEY OF BROS. JOSEPH* [SPANGENHERG] AND MATTHEW REUTZ† THROUGH MARYLAND AND VIRGINIA IN JULY AND AUGUST, 1748. On June 30th, O. S., we left Bethlehem together with Bro. Owen Rice‡ and John Hopsonǁ. We traveled by way of Macungie and Heidelberg, at which latter place Bro. Joseph administered to the little congregation, on July 3rd, a blessed communion service. Then they visited Tulpehocken, Quittopehilla [now Lebanon, Pa.], Warwick [Lititz, Pa.] and Lancaster. Then they continued their journey by way of Kreutz Creek, Catores [Codorus, in York county], Canowago [Conewago, near Littlestown, Adams county], to Manakesy [Monocacy], in Maryland, whence Bro. Owen Rice and Hopson turned southeast to the lower parts of Maryland and Virginia. Bro. Joseph and Matthew Reuz turned first northwest to An- * August Gottlieb Spangenberg, called familiarly Joseph by his brethren, was born July 15, 1704. In 1722 he entered the University of Jena. In 1727 he met Zinzendorf, and in 1733 became his assistant at Herrnhut. In 1744 he was ordained Moravian Bishop, and after Zinzendorf's death, in 1762, he became his successor. He visited America four times, and was for twenty years at the head of the American branch of the Moravian Church. He died, after a long and eminently useful life, on September 18, 1792. Reincke, Register of Moravians, p. 76. † Matthew Reutz arrived in New York with the "Second Sea Congregation," on November 26, 1743. Ordained a Presbyter in 1748. Labored in the Gospel among the Swedes in New Jersey. Reincke, Register of Moravians, pp. 57, 81. ‡ Rev. Owen Rice, from Haverford-West, Wales, came to Pennsylvania with the "First Sea Congregation," on the Catherine, and arrived in Philadelphia June 7, 1742. Ordained a Deacon at Bethlehem. October 27, 1748, by Bishops von Watteville, Spangenberg and Cammerhoff. While in America he was pastor of the congregations at Philadelphia, Bethlehem, New York and in New Jersey. Returned to England in 1754, and was pastor at Wyke, Kingswood, Leominster, Plymouth, Bath and Gomersal, and Gracehill, Ireland. He died at Fulneck, 1787. Communicated by Mr. John W,. Jordan. ǁ John Hopson was a prominent citizen of Lancaster, Pa., and member of the Moravian congregation there. See Reincke, Register of Moravians, p. 103.

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 462

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 462 [Click for larger image]Page 462

    Map accompanying Draper MSS. account of Brady's Leap. Map shows Indian trail, place of Brady's Leap and Lake Brady. The squares are one-half mile square.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 393

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 393 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 393

    the sloop the owner, John Benrose [Penrose], the captain, whose name was Sherwood, and a sailor. [The missionaries returned to Pennsylvania by way of New York, arriving at Bethlehem on April 10, 1744]. THE SITE OF OLD "JAMES TOWNE," 1607-1698.* BY SAMUEL H. YONGE. (Continued from page 276.) As the time of Newport's colony, immediately after its arrival in Virginia was occupied in exploring the country, building the stockade, and preparing a cargo for the return voyage of the ships, the building of quarters was neglected, and those erected were inadequate in number and afforded but imperfect shelter. The best of them were built of rails and roofed with marsh grass thatch covered with earth.† According to the "Breife Declaration," some of the settlers lived in holes in the ground, as is sometimes done on the western plains, where they are called "dug-outs." After Newport's departure, hot weather and general illness of the party supervening, the completing of the huts was prevented until the fall of 1607.‡ The first huts were destroyed by fire in January, 1608, and were not fully replaced until after Newport's departure for England, in April of that year,§ about which time the clearing of the four acres was begun. The huts which replaced those that were burned were more * Copyright, 1903, by Samuel H. Yonge. † Works, Captain John Smith, p. 957. (The references in this mono-graph to "Works, Captain John Smith," are from Prof. Edward Arbers edition.) ‡ lbid, pp. 10, 96, 392. § Ibid, pp. 105, 409.

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