Thursday, 02 January 2014 07:30

Discussion #2

This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 272

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 272 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 272

    whom we met whether we could cross the mountain to-day. He said: Yes, and told us that some one was living on the mountain with whom we could have an opportunity to stay over night. We believed it and drove to the mountain, but had to pass a large creek1 on the way. Then we tried whether we could ascend the mountain, but it was inmpossible because the foot of the mountain was too steep. We concluded therefore to unload and carry our baggage [on horseback] up on the mountain. Bro. Lischer and Pfeil stayed with the wagon, the rest went up the mountain. Wheni we had covered half of the way it began to rain. It was also difficult for our horses, but we hoped to find the house on top of the mountain, of which the man had spoken. It took us a long time to ascend and when we finally reached the top no house nor water could be found. We were therefore compelled also to descend the mountain, although it was very dark and rained fast. Finally after many vain wishes we reached a little creek in the valley. It had taken us two and a half hours to cross this mountain.2 We then camped, as well as we could, but experienced much difficulty in starting a fire, for it rained very fast and everything was wet. We raised our tent and lay down upon the wet blankets. Here we rested for a while. To-wards morning it cleared and became very cold. On November 3, we went very early back across the mountain to get the rest of the baggage and the wagon. Bro. Gottlob, Nathanael and Kalberland meanwhile stayed with the tent. The brethren who had remained with the wagon also had had a cold night, and we were glad to see them again. We put our baggage once more on our horses and then carried most of our things to the top of the mountain. Here we made a fire and Bro. Haberland staved there. The rest of the brethren went back again to bring up the wagon, which was pretty empty. But we had to push very hard to get the wagon up. After an hour and a half we reached the top safely. After we had loaded the wagon again we drove up hill for a short distance. 1 This large creek is probably Back creek, which is due south of the Roanoke River. 2 This mountain, which gave the Moravian travelers so much trouble, was no doubt the Blue Ridge, which they crossed at Magotty Gap.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 135

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 135 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 135

    ning we came to the Misselim [Moselem, Berks Co.] mill and staved there over night. The people were rather friendly and more ready to serve us than at other times, when they were unwilling to keep the brethren over night. On the way we took along several articles of our baggage, which had to be taken from our wagon, because it was stalled and could not be moved. On October 9, we rose very early and continued our journey. Bro. Grube and Kalberland preceded us. A man met them who asked whether any one of us knew how to let blood, a poor servant being sick at Uly Hui's, who had heard of us and urgently requested us to come to him. We went to him, and Bro. Kalberland bled him, for which he was very thankful. At noon we came to Bro. Jacob Mueller's.3 He was not at home. His boy took us over the "Tulpehokke" [creek] in a canoe. It almost capsized, but our angels held it fast. We soon came to the Heidelberg school house and found our friends, the Muellers, well. They were glad to see and to entertain us once more. There were also several brethren present, who worked at the new meeting house. They were glad to greet us again. To-wards evening we came to our dear friends, Loesch,4 by whom (3). Dr. Hans Martin Kalberlahn, born in Norway, age 31 years, the physician. (4). Hans Peterson, born in Danish Holstein, age 28 years, a tailor. (5). Christopher Merkly, born in Germany, age 39 years, a baker. (6). Herman Loesch, born in Pennsylvania, age 27 years, a farmer. (7). Erich Ingebretsen, born in Norway, age 31 years, a carpenter. (8). Henrich Feldhausen, born in Holstein, age 38 years, a carpenter. (9). Johannes Lisher, a farmer. (10). Jacob Lung, born in Germany, age 40 years, a gardener. (11). Friederich Jacob Pfeil, born in Germany, age 42 years, a shoe-maker and tanner. (12). Jacob Beroth, born in Germany, age 28 years, a farmer. With these twelve, came the brethren Gottlob Koenigsderfer, also a minister, Nathanael Seidel ordained bishop in 1758, and Joseph Haberland. After a brief visit these three returned to Pennsylvania. 3 Jacob Mueller was a inember of the Moravian congregation in North Heidelberg Township, Berks Co., Pa. He lived one mile north of the Heidelberg schoolhouse, close to the Tulpehocken creek. Taken from Alphabetical Register of Moravians, a MS. in the Bethlehem archives. 4 George Loesch was a member of the Moravian ongregation at the Quittopahilla. He lived at Tulpehocken, eight miles northwest of the Hebron church. See Alphabetical Register in Bethlehem archives.

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Illustrations (inside)

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Illustrations (inside) [Click for larger image]Illustrations (inside)

    Illustrations; William H. West; Perry Leaving the Lawrence for the Niagara; Mouth of Cascade Creek, Where Perry's Fleet ws Built; Perry's Battle Flag; Put-in-Bay — Smoke of Battle in Distance; Oliver Hazard Perry; The Perry Medal; Jesse Duncan Elliott; Perry Monument, Cleveland, Ohio; Brady's Leap — Draper MSS, Map; Scene of Brady's Leap

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