Thursday, 02 January 2014 07:30

Discussion #2

This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 282

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 282 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 282

    CORRECTIONS AND ADDITIONS. Vol. XI, p. 118, note *. Omit the last sentence. Colonel Thomas Cresap settled at Old Town, Md. See Magazinie XI, 236, note. Idem, p. 125, third line from bottom. Omit Robert Lewis. The name of this Englishman is unknown. Robert Luhny (Loony) lived at the James river. See Magazine XII, 82, 152. Idem, p. 127. The notes on this page ought to have been reversed. Idem, p. 127, note *. It is not entirely certain that Jacob Baer, Sr., removed to Virginia. His name occurs in the assessment lists of Conestoga townsnip, Lancaster Co., Pa, in 1724-5. See Ellis & Evans, History of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, p. 21. His two sons, John and Jacob, Jr., settled near Elkton in 1740 and married daughters of Adam Miller, as stated. Idem, p. 129, note ‡. Mr. Schmidt, originally a dentist, officiated occasionally as pastor among the Lutherans at New Hanover, Pa., from 1736 to 1743. On the arrival of Muehlenberg he went to Virginia, where he preached for a number of years. In 1747 Muehlenberg met him at Frederick, Md. See Hallesche Nachrichten, New Ed., Vol. I, pp. 335, 425. Mr. Schnell also refers to him in 1747 as being at Frederick. Idem, p. 374, note *. The main reasons why Schnell did not wish to go through the Irish settlements are no doubt correctly stated by J. A. W., (Magazinie XII, 203.) At the same time it must be admitted that not much love was lost between the Germans and the Irish. See Magazine XI, 126, XII, 68, 140. Idem, p. 379, note *. The note relative to the several locations of Orange Court House, Virginia, is somewhat in error. The first court house was located near Sommerville's Ford, about four miles west of

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 389

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 389 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 389

    Mr. Bolzius. In it many lies were told about our Brethren and many wicked things were falsely reported about them. This letter, covering two sheets, was read by Bolzius to the people one afternoon, instead of a sermon, after having administered the holy communion in the forenoon. This has stirred up the people against us. On the 2nd, I visited Mr. Ade, a shoemaker, and later Michael Schweizer, to whom I delivered a letter from Bro. Hagen. In the evening Bro. Brownfield, together with Henry Beck* and John Bay, had their usual meeting, to which they also invited Bro. Hussey and myself. On the 3rd and 4th, I visited a number of people. On the 5th, being Christmas (i. e., December 25th, old style), I preached a German sermon in Savannah, in the house of the Brethren. A number of people came together, when they heard that a strange minister was there. In the afternoon but very few came. After the services a man spoke to me, who at one time intended to stab Bro. Hagen. His name is Bellico. But he is now converted and he requested me in his name to ask Bro. Hagen's forgiveness. On the 6th, as on Monday after Christmas, I preached to the Germans at the "White Ploff." I also visited an awakened man and friend, Berger. He asked me to visit him frequently, which I did. As a result he was deposed from his office as elder of the Reformed congregation, because, as the people said, he had fallen away from his religion. On the 7th, I returned again to Savannah, where I visited several Germans, among others Mr. Astherr. On the 12th, I preached in Savannah in the forenoon, and in settled at Ebenezer, twenty-four miles from Savannah. Other colonists followed soon afterwards. See P. A. Strobel, The Salzburgers and their Descendants. Baltim re, 1855. * Brownfield and Beck were among the first adherents of the Moravians in Savannah. Brownfield had come to Georgia from England in February, 1737, with General Oglethorpe. Beck had arrived in 1738, and was for a time a member of the "Whitefield Economy." Both left Georgia in 1745 and settled in Bethlehem. Both were later ordained deacons and died at Bethlehem. See Register of Moravians, pp. 73 f. and 77.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 241

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 241 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 241

    famous Mosheim,* whom Bro. Gottschalk also visited, and who received him with much love. His predecessor was the father of the well-known Stoever.† He was not at home, but had gone to Williamsburg to take his tobacco, which is part of his salary, to the market. The people there asked Bro. Joseph to preach for them, but he refused because the minister was not at home, and without his knowledge and consent he would not preach. Very modest and nice people live there; with four of them they became more fully acquainted. One of them said he would visit us, together with Rev. Mr. Klug, at Bethlehem. On July 30th, they came, towards evening, to the Licken Run [Licking Run], or Germantown, where they lodged with an old friend by the name of Holzklau. The little village is settled with Reformed miners from Nassau-Siegen.‡ They live very quietly together and are nice people. *John Lorenz Mosheim was a famous historian and theologian (1693-1755), professor in Kiel, Helmstadt and Goettingen. He is best known through his extensive church history. † On September 11 , 1728, there arrived in Philadelphia Johann Caspar Stoever, Sr., Missionaire, and Johann Caspar Stoever, S. S. Theo. Stud. The latter remained in Pennsylvania and was instrumental in founding many Lutheran churches. The former went to Madison county, Virginia, in 1733. The relation of these two men has long been a problem to Lutheran historians. Neither the editors of the "Hallesche Nachrichten" nor the last prominent Lutheran historian (Rev. T. E. Schmauk, in Lutheran Church in Pennsylvania, 1902, in Vol. XI, of Proceedings of the Pennsylvania German Society, p. 245) were able to shed any light on this subject. The statement of this diary settles this vexed quest ion definitely by informing us that the Virginia missionary was the father of the younger Stoever who labored in Pennsylvania. ‡ This statement dispels all doubts and conjectures as to the nativity of the first German settlers at Germanna. Bishop Meade, in his Old Churches and Families of Virginia, Vol. II, pp. 74-76. and Dr. Slaughter, in his History of St. Mark's Parish, pp. 42-45, give interesting accounts of these people, but their statements are to some extent inaccurate. Dr. Slaughter, especially, was in error when hazarding the conjecture that they were a remnant of the German settlement at Newbern, North Carolina, which escaped to Virginia after the Indian massacre at that place in 1711, and, unfortunately, later writers have adopted his theory as a fact. As shown by these diaries and as stated in a previous note, Germantown, Fauquier, was settled by colonists from Nassau-Siegen, Westphalia, Germany. The house built by Tillman

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