Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 488 [Click for larger image]Page 488

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 487 [Click for larger image]Page 487

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 485 [Click for larger image]Page 485

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 484 [Click for larger image]Page 484

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 483 [Click for larger image]Page 483

Published in Volume XX — 1911
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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 48

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 48 [Click for larger image]Page 48

    A VANISHING RACE. MRS. JENNIE C. MORTON. Frankfort, Ky. Read by the author before the Ohio Valley Historical Association, at their meeting with the Kentucky State Historical Society in the New Capitol, October 16th, 1909. Whether we call the Indian, North American or South American, we know the Indian race historically as a peculiar and distinctly marked people—disappearing gradually into oblivion. An authentic history of the race has not been written, but the traditions concerning it, tinged with probability, is that the race is descended from those fierce and terrible Asiatics, the Tartars. The pathways of the Indian, unlike any other nation of equal intelligence wandering down through the ages, are reddened with the blood of the slain, or they are smoking with human sacrifices, to gratify their horrible thirst for capture or revenge, and barbaric amusement. Students of Ethnology are agreed upon the origin of the Indian as a branch of the Asiatic people we have mentioned, because of the resemblance of some tribes on our Continent, to the Japanese in cast of feature; but the stern and forbidding statures and smileless faces of the Indian limit the resemblance, if indeed it exists. This article is not written to reproduce in history an account of the revolting habits, customs, manners, arts and language of this strange race. Only that which arrests the attention now of civilized people in their efforts to train, control, civilize and educate it, should be dwelt upon. However senseless to us—their arts and their ideas. Their weird and wonderful fables-yet they are above our contempt. and beyond our ridicule, these brown simoons of humanity—the Indians. They have been driven from every country and every

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  • The History… of the Potsdam Congregation, Page 4

    The History of the Potsdam Congregation
    of the Church of the Brethren

    Page 4— The History… of the Potsdam Congregation [Click for larger image] title=Page 4

    Isaac Ditmer 1862-1937 Lovina [Cunning] Ditmer 1859-1937 Irene [Bridenbaugh] Ditmer 1888-1961 John Henry Ditmer 1851-1930 Susanna [Steffey] Ditmer 1853-1930 Michael Ditmer 1856-1927 Rollin Ditmer 1883-1960 Jennie [Christian]Eikenberry 1887-1974 Josiah Eikenberry 1886-1967 Mina [Waitman] Eikenberry 1884-1959 Dale Fourman 1908-1965 Fanny [Christian] Fourman 1888-1976 Galen Fourman 1910-1982 Phares Fourman 1887-1967 Gladys [Hoke] Furlong 1903-1885 Anna Galbreath Ethel [Miller] Ganger 1886-1966 John Henry Ganger 1869-1955 Leonard Ganger 1908-1982 Zora [Delk] McCowenGanger 1884-1936 Lilly [Black] Green 1880-1963 Alice [Nease] Hall 1888-1975 Amos Hall 1864-1958 Elizabeth [Ditmer] Hall 1867-1927 Esther [Baker] Hall 1908-2002 Oscar Hall 1896-1983 Perry Hall 1864-1957 Samuel Hall 1883-1959 Estella [Miller] Hall 1900-1969 Susie [Clement] Hall 1868-1948 John Heckman 1864-1940 Lulu [Miller] Heckman 1910-2000 Mary [Ganger] Heckman 1877-1953 Emma [Miller] Heisey 1882-1944 Lester Heisey 1881-1950 Forest Henderson 1912-2004 Harold Henderson 1910-1975 Homer Henderson 1904-1993 Velma [Schenk] Hepner 1908-1994 Arthur Hess 1855-1929 Caroline [Cornor] Hess 1855-1925 Charles Hissong 1872-1954 Sadie [Hall] Hissong 1885-1973 Lovina [Miller] Hoffman 1908-1971 David E. Hoke 1870-1939 David C. Hoke 1909-1984 Edna Hoke 1899-1947 Lina [Dohner] Hoke 1872-1954 Dorothy [Myers] Honeyman 1905-1990 Lola [Longanecker] Henderson Honeyman 1883-1967 Ruth [Miller] Hypes 1914-1993 Charles Isenbarger 1866-1941 Dora [Falknor] Isenbarger 1868-1955 Andrew Jackson Johnston 1872-1943 Audrey [Bowman] Johnston 1896-1968 Arrabell [Norris] Johnston 1879-1960 Edward Johnston 1893-1984 Elgar Johnston 1906-1959 Ella [Kress] Johnston 1867-1953 John H. Johnston 1868-1937 Treva Johnston 1903-1995 Mary [Hoke] Kauffman 1904-1973 Emma [Wolfe] WestermanKress 1881-1962 William Kress 1870-1949 Alice [Besecker] Kunkleman 1909-1997 Nancy [Timmons] CarsonLambert 1852-1929 Levi Litten 1864-1927 Rosetta [Netzley] Litten 1865-1932 Davis Longanecker 1857-1946 Lydia [Isenbarger]Longanecker 1857-1931 Anna [Puterbaugh]McGillvary 1901-1984 Treva Marshall c1901- Curtis Miller 1903-2001 David Miller 1906-1992 Elizabeth [Gordon] Miller 1858-1943 Harley Miller 1880-1958 Isaac Miller 1868-1931 John Miller 1844-1925 Martha [Stager] Miller 1880-1962 Sarah [Falknor] Miller 1844-1929 Calvin Minnich 1880-1947

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 117

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 117 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 117

    On October 30th, we started early and came, in the forenoon, to the Potomac River, where we breakfasted with Isaac Gerison, a cousin of our Bro. Gerison.* A fried squirrel, which was placed before us for the first time in our life, tasted well. Then, we traveled, with a light heart, some twenty miles up along the Potomack, wading through the "Licken Creek" [Licking Creek] and leaving "Long Island" at our left. On our way we came to a German house, where we found the whole family clothed in Indian fashion. The woman complained that they had not heard a sermon for five years. A boy took us with a horse through the next creek, called "Knattewe" [Conotowans Creek]. In the evening we arrived, cheerfully, at the house of Carl Bock, with whom we stayed over night. An English schoolmaster was also there who was especially friendly, because Mr. Monday† had promised to assist him in getting his son to Bethlehem where he could study Latin without any expense to him. I gave him more correct information. Otherwise there was much confusion in the house during the whole night, because all kinds of young people were there, among whom whiskey circulated freely. On October 31st. we passed no house for thirty-five miles, but indescribably high mountains. We started early, having some "Jahny cicks" [Johnny cakes] in our knapsack. The mountains which we had to climb, especially the steep ascent. made me so weak that I soon gave out, but the Lamb blessed the drops which I took with a drink of cold water from the creek, so that I felt strong again. Thus we continued our journey over the high "German Mountain," through the "Fifteen Mile Creek," and came, in the afternoon, to "Leonhardt's Spring." Here we refreshed ourselves and ate our "Jahny cakes." Then we hurried on, and after passing safely through two creeks. [Evitts and Wills Creeks, near Cumberland, Md.]* Probably Captain Nicholas Garrison. See A. Reincke, Register of Ike Memhers of the Moravian Church. 1727-I754. Bethlehem, 1873. p. 55. Note. † Major Monday, a friend of the Moravians at Monocacy.

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