Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 488 [Click for larger image]Page 488

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 487 [Click for larger image]Page 487

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 485 [Click for larger image]Page 485

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 484 [Click for larger image]Page 484

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 483 [Click for larger image]Page 483

Published in Volume XX — 1911
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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 313

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 313 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 313

    HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL NOTES AND QUERIES. THE DUNKERS AND THE SIEBEN-TAEGER. (Communicated) In Volume Xl, page 125, of the Virgitlia Magazine of History and Biography, the following passage appears as a translation from a Moravian diary of 1749; "We were only a few miles from the Seventh Day Baptists [Dunkers] who live here at the New River. But we had enough of the description which the people gave of them." The editor of the translation makes the mistake here of identifying the Seventh Day Baptists with the Dunkers. In the next issue of the magazine, however, he amends the passage, saying: "It ought to read: 'We were only a few miles from the Sabbatarians' [Sieben-taeger). instead of Seventh Day Baptists."—Va. Hist. Mag., Vol. Xl, page 234, note. In the same place he also shows that the community at New river were members of the Ephrata Society. etc. In the last issue of this magazine. Vol. XII, No.2, on page 147, it is said of two Sabbatarians who were found several miles southwest of Staunton by the Moravian brethren on October 25. 1753: "These Sabbatarians were evidently members of the Ephrata colony at the New River." These notes, from which I have quoted make it pretty clear that the New river Sabbatarians, otherwise Sieben-taeger, belonged to the Pennsylvania sect known as the Ephrata Society; but whether the Dunkers were Seventh Day Baptists, or not, is still left in more or less obscurity. The confusion as to the real character of the Dunkers, is "worse confounded" in the quotation from Dr. Thomas Walker, given in connection with the citation I have made last above. Dr. Walker writes: "He [English) has a mill which is the furthest back except one lately built by the sect of people who call themselves the Brotherhood of Euphrates [Ephrata] and are commonly called Dunkards, who are the upper inhabitants on the New River. * * The Dunkards are an odd people who make it a matter of Religion not to shave their Beards, Iy on Beds, or eat Flesh. * * The unmarried have no private Property, but live on a common Stock. They don't baptize either young or old, they keep their Sabbath on Saturday, and hold that all men shall be

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Illustrations

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Illustrations [Click for larger image]Illustrations

    Illustrations; Map of Wisconsin, Showing Mound Distribution; Map of Aztalan Earthworks, (Wisconsin); Diagram of Wisconsin Enclosures; Series of Conical Mounds at Aztalan, Wisconsin; Conical Mounds in Cutler Park, Wauketa, Wisconsin; Koshkonong and Gen. Atkinson Groups, Lake Koshkonong, Wisconsin; Noe Springs Group of Mounds, Lake Koshkonong, Wisconsin; Kumlein Group of Mounds near Lake Koshkonong, Wisconsin; Platform Mound in Trempealean County, Wisconsin; Diagrams of Panther, Mink, etc., Effigy Mounds, Wisconsin; Diagrams of Squirrel and Other Effigy Mounds, Wisconsin; Diagrams of Bear Effigy Mounds, Wisconsin; Diagrams of Deer Effigy Mounds, Wisconsin; Diagrams of Bird Mounds, Wisconsin Diagram of Lower Dells Group of Bird Mounds in Sauk Co., Wis.; Diagrams of Turtle and Frog Mounds at Lake Koshkonong, Wis.; Diagram of Man Mound near Baraboo and Ft. Atkinson Intaglio, Wisconsin; Photograph of Ft. Atkinson Intaglio, Wisconsin; Photograph of Linear Mound at Lake Waubesa, Wisconsin; Combination Mounds, Wisconsin; Photograph of Corn Fields, Carroll College at Waukesha, Wisconsin; Photograph of Garden Beds near Stockbridge, Calumet Co., Wis.; Diagram of General Harmar's Order of March; Diagram of Harmar's Order of Encampment; View of Scioto River and Diagram of Mound Builder's Circle; Indian Scout and Pickaway Plains with Indian Settlements; City of Circleville with Court House in Center; Main Street, Circleville; William Henry Rice; Roeligg Brinkerhoff; Major George W. Rue; General John H. Morgan; Morgan Surrender Monument

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 279

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 279 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 279

    Haberland, who attempted to cross on a tree that was lying across the creek, fell into the water and lost his hat, but found it again soon afterwards. The road was tolerable, except a few steep hills. Every mile or two we found water. We ate our dinner seven miles beyond the "Meho" [Mayo] River on a little hill. At its foot is a creek with a rapid current. In the afternoon we passed several very steep hills, which were almost impassable, likewise several difficult banks of creeks. Towards evening it began to rain and we hurried to reach the "Ten" [Dan] River, but it became so dark that we had to stay at a creek three miles this side of the river. We kindled a fire and dried ourselves a little. It began to clear with a northwest wind. At twelve o'clock at night we started again to cross the "Ten" [Dan] River. A brother preceded the wagon with a pine torch to show us the way. At two o'clock in the night we came to the "Ten" [Dan] River. As it did not rain we thought the river would not rise very much and as a result stayed to-night on this side of the river. It turned cold and we had a little wood to burn. We were all very tired as we had driven to-day 25 miles from the "Meho" [Mayo] River to this place. On November 14, we went very early to the river to see whether we could cross, but it had risen two feet and had a very rapid current. Hence we stayed, meanwhile improving the bank leading down to the river, which was very steep. Several brethren went off hunting, but returned empty handed. The man, who lives across the river,9 visited us and asked Bro. Gottlob and Nathanael to go with him to his house, which they did. He urged Bro. Gottlob very much to baptize his child. Bro. Nathanael excused him, because he could speak but little English. But the man was not satisfied, saying he did not care how it was baptized, if it were only done. Bro. Jacob Loesch went across the river with the canoe and preceded us eleven miles, going to Mr. Altem, to order some provisions. On November 15, several brethren went off hunting, but returned again empty handed. Bro. Gottlob,and Nathanael went 9 According to an old English translation of this diary, his name was "John Carmichael, an Irishman."

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