Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 488 [Click for larger image]Page 488

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 487 [Click for larger image]Page 487

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 485 [Click for larger image]Page 485

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 484 [Click for larger image]Page 484

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 483 [Click for larger image]Page 483

Published in Volume XX — 1911
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  • The History… of the Potsdam Congregation, Page 11

    The History of the Potsdam Congregation
    of the Church of the Brethren

    Page 11— The History… of the Potsdam Congregation [Click for larger image] title=Page 11

    Church of the Brethren in Chicago IL. Known as Parson Myers, his pastoral duties centered on the Bethel and Kearney congregations in Nebraska. He gave $300,000.00 to Bethany to help establish a chair in memory of Professor Warren W. Slabaugh. Ted Wiant was licensed in 1966, but did not fulfill the call. Burton Wolf, pastor of the West Charleston Church of the Brethren and our current moderator was licensed in 1978. Jerry Collins, pastor of the Ludlow Falls Christian Church was licensed in 1986. Dwayne Heck, pastor of the White Cottage Church of the Brethren was licensed in 1997 and is to be there ordained August 22, 2004. The Brethren’s Home In 1895 Adam Minnich, a member here at Georgetown and Jesse Stutsman were appointed to a committee to establish an “Old Folks and Orphans Home”. Adam Minnich and Adam Pfeiffer served on the first Trustees Board. Final plans were approved by a special district meeting in Feb 1902, when Joseph Longanecker, a former member at Georgetown, was appointed the solicitor. Within a month, it was officially named The Brethren’s Home. Joseph Longanecker also served on the locating committee which in the end chose Greenville. The dedication of the facilities old Peoples Building and the Childrens Building was held September 3, 1903. The first to be admitted were Brother Henry and his third wife Sister Rebecca [Kinzie-Pfoutz-Shearer] Jones from the Salem congregation. He was elected to the ministry in 1852 at Painter Creek and occasionally filled the call to preach to the Georgetown congregation. The Georgetown-Potsdam Church of the Brethren was once the home congregation to the following Superintendents and Matrons of the Brethren’s Home: Granville W. & his third wife Sarah [Shellabarger] Neher Minnich 1909-1915 and 1917-1919, Phares D. & Fanny [Christian] Fourman 1937-1946 and 1949-1953, and Robert L. & Dorothy [Myers] Honeyman 1959-1968. The foresight and involvement of members of our local congregation to help establish and maintain the Brethren’s Home has stood well the test of time, providing a safe and secure environment for a large number of the members of the Potsdam Church of the Brethren in their twilight years.

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 335

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 335 [Click for larger image]Page 335

    TWENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL MEETING OF THE OHIO STATE ARCHÆOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY. May 31, 1911. The twenty-sixth annual meeting of the Ohio State Archæological and Historical Society was held in the Hunter Society Room, Page Hall, Ohio State University, Columbus , Ohio, at two o'clock P. M., Wednesday, May 31, 1911. The following members were present: Prof. M. R. Andrews, Marietta, Mr. George F. Bareis, Canal Winchester, Mr. A. J. Baughman, Mansfield, Mr. H. E. Buck, Delaware, Mr. C. H. Gallup, Norwalk, Hon. J. W. Harper, Cincinnati, Mr. Almer Hegler, Washington, C. H., Prof. W. C. Mills, Columbus, Mr. E. O. Randall, Columbus, Mr. L. P. Schaus, Columbus, Mr. Z. T. Smith, Upper Sandusky, Dr. H. A. Thompson, Dayton, Dr. H. O. Whittaker, New Burlington, Mr. E. F. Wood, Columbus, Dr. G. F. Wright, Oberlin, Mr. W. Z. Zuck, Columbus. Messages of regret, because of their inability to attend the meeting, were received from M. B. Bushnell, B. F. Prince, R. E. Hills, D. J. Ryan, N. B. C. Love and C. S. Dana. The meeting was called to order by the President, Dr. G. Frederick Wright, who stated that the first thing in order would be the reading of the minutes of the last Annual Meeting. Secretary Randall said he would follow his habitual custom in regard to the reading of the minutes by simply referring the members of the society to the' published report of the meeting in our annuals. From the written report which he had in hand detailing at length the proceedings of the last Annual Meeting,

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 477

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 477 [Click for larger image]Page 477

    minded boys must pass. The "experience" is not unique but universal, the awakening of the expanding soul to the mysteries of an unseen but nevertheless a real world; the working of an irresistible spirit upon the troubled waters of a soul seeking to reconcile the natural inherent religion with the dogmatic or conventional creed of the church. This reconciliation must be solved by each youth in his own way, influenced or aided by his own peculiar environment. How the Buckeye Boy wrought out his great problem and found his permanent foothold in a natural faith is told with unaffected candor and reverential delicacy. This review of youthful times — the backward look of a half a century or more — is a rare and precious playspell in the later days of a mature and fruitful literary life POEMS ON OHIO. We believe it was Isaac Walton in his "Complete Angler" who spoke of "old fashioned poetry, but choicely good." There are of course poets and poets, and good, bad and indifferent. The little volume entitled "Poems on Ohio," collected and annotated by Professor C. L. Martzolff, and published by the Ohio State Archæological and Historical Society offers a variety ill degree of excellency in the quality of the effusions by the rhyming writers who have taken Ohio, localities therein and historical incidents and characters connected therewith, as their subjects. Some of these poems are by authors whose names are fixed in the literary firmament; others of these poems will be classed by the critics as mere rhyming productions, a few verging towards the class designated as doggerel, but all are interesting and from some point of view deserving of preservation. They number in this volume some hundred and thirty and reflect the sentiment and culture of the early pioneer days. It was well worth while for Prof. Martzolff to gather up these stray poems and put them in permanent form. The editor's annotations are of great value for they embrace brief biographical notices of the authors, whose names, many of them at least, would otherwise have been lost in the shades of oblivion. Mr. Martzolff is well qualified for his part in the publication, for he has been for years a zealous student of Ohio history and his many valuable articles in the volumes of the Ohio State Archæological and Historical Society have made for him a recognized place in the literature of the history of Ohio. This volume should be in every public library in the State and to the teachers it will be of great use on occasions commemorative of historic events and in exercises o f a patriotic nature. The volume retails for $1.00 and is sold by the Society publishing it.

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