Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 488 [Click for larger image]Page 488

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 487 [Click for larger image]Page 487

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 485 [Click for larger image]Page 485

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 484 [Click for larger image]Page 484

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 483 [Click for larger image]Page 483

Published in Volume XX — 1911
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Recently Added

  • History – Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico & Louisiana, Blank page

    Thirty-One Years of Organized Work in Oklahoma,
    Texas, New Mexico and Louisiana by
    Church of the Brethren from 1891 to 1922

    Blank page — History: Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico & Louisiana [Click for larger image] title=Blank page

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 78

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 78 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 78

    mon has to be annouinced a few days beforehand from Catores [Codorus]. This can easily be done, because Br. Owen goes along. He can precede Bro. Joseph a few days. In Little Canawage, where Mr. Peizel resides, and to whom, accordinig to the resolution [of the Synod] §4, a visit has been promised; Mrs. Regnier has urgently requested Mr. Peizel that if the Brethren should come to him to let her know it, because she would like to speak with one of the Brethren. In Manakasy [Monocacy, Md.], are two places where we can preach. The usual place is at Mr. Weller's. Across the "Manakasy" a few German families live, about ten, who would perhaps like to hear a sermon. A man called Ellrod, whom I visited there, will be able to give more information. Captain Ogle and Jacob Weller are both very dear hosts of the Brethren. It would perhaps be a blessing to Mr. Weller's house if Bro. Joseph would lodge there occasionally. In Kanigetschik [Conococheague, Md.], which is situated 28 miles from Capt. Ogle's, across the Little Blue Mountains, to-wards the north west, Jonathan Haeger is our dear host. The house of his brother, who lives nearby, is our English and German pulpit. If Bro. Joseph could so arrange it as to be there on Thursday, the sermon could very well be appointed for the following Sunday. The last time I was there I preached two German sermons, one in the forenoon and the other in the afternoon, with an open and full heart, to a large crowd. One of the elders promised me that, if I should come back, I might preach in their church. Immediately beyond the blue mountains, before coming to Jonathan Haeger's, perhaps eight or ten miles before, a German man lives by the name of Gottfried Mang, the son-in-law of the old Mr. Geffer(s)on (?), at Lancaster. Not far from there lives the son-in-law of the dear, old father Lischer. If Bro. Joseph leaves Capt. Ogle's house early Wednesday morning and rests during tile hottest part of the day, be can be at Gottfried Mang's house in good time and stay there over night. This will be very acceptable to those people, because they asked me to rend the Brethren to them. On the following Thursday, he [Bro. Joseph] can be in good time in "Kanigotschik" at Jonathan Haeger's. If Bro. Joseph desires to have his passport signed, before

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  • Discussion #4

    This blog entry shall be another foray into the mysteries of land records, or perhaps more correctly, what can be found if you dig deeply enough into them.  Additionally, it will include a somewhat fictionalized account of what may have occurred if your ancestor was contemplating moving to the newly opened Northwest Territory.

    Unfortunately with the advent of the Internet, recliner-chair research is more the norm than the rule.  And it keeps getting worse as time goes on.  While any researcher worth his salt knows that researching deeds is one of the areas that should be explored not many are willing to travel down the road less traveled.  Being lazy or unwilling to have it performed by a knowledgeable person prevails.  Generally a researcher will got to the county of their interest and pull any and all deeds that pertain to their ancestor, and if they are smart they will spend time while there to research the deeds of other parties they are interested in.  I do not recall how many times the trip to a court house has been made only to discover many months later that I should have pulled another record I saw.  A lamentable fact, but true.

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