Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 488 [Click for larger image]Page 488

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 487 [Click for larger image]Page 487

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 485 [Click for larger image]Page 485

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 484 [Click for larger image]Page 484

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 483 [Click for larger image]Page 483

Published in Volume XX — 1911
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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 74

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 74 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 74

    at eleven o'clock. This pleased them very much and they said they would notify the people. On April 11-March 31, the r-gular reader [John Jung] came at once to me and paid me a long visit. I was able to speak with him and Hoffman's brother much about the Saviour. My heart opened to them and they sat there as if they would take every word out of my mouth. At twelve o'clock I preached with God's grace and blessing to the little flock in their pretty and well built but little clapboard church. After the sermon they tried their utmost to give ine some money, so that I could hardly keep them back. I assured them that I would take no money for the sermon, and whatever I needed for the journey I had. They thanked me very much and asked me to visit them again, and desired especially to see our brother Hoffman among them. John Jung and [John Henry] Hoffman accompanied me across the North River of the Rippehaning [Rappahannock], and very late in the evening I came to the old Mr. Holzklo in Germantown. After I had sat for a short while with the old man he asked me if I were a preacher? I said: "Yes." He said: "Would you not stay with us till Sunday and give us a sermon?" I answered that I could not stay so long, as I had appointed three sermons for Sunday at Manakasy [Monocacy], but if it would suit then during the week I would preach for them day after to-morrow. He said: "Indeed, I shall ask the people to come day after to-morrow, that is Friday at ten o'clock," with which I was satisfied. As Holzklo is getting old he is becoming religious. He asked his children to come into the room, and by various questions gave me an opportunity to tell them something about the Saviour. On Thursday, April 11-March 31, I rested. I had several visitors during the day. Especially the old schoolmaster of the place came to me. He begins in his own way to prepare himself for his departure, because he sees that there is no other way, nor any possibility to remain in this world, but that he must die. I told him of the false and true righteousness and that only the blood of Jesus can justify and save us. I also visited his children, and told them something about the Saviour.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 151

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 151 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 151

    drove two miles farther over a good road, passed a creek and came to a house where we stopped most of the day. The people baked some bread for us and we bought a pig which we butchered at once. Mr. Illisen also came to us, from whom Bro. Herman bought the last corn. He asked the brethren to shoe his horse, which they did. He also said that he intended to travel to Philadelphia within a short time and that if we had anything to deliver he would gladly take it along. Bro. Gottlob and Nathanael wrote several letters to our dear brethren at Bethlehem, which they addressed to Sam. Powel in Philadelphia. This evening we went on four miles farther, but had a pretty good road. We took several loaves of bread along which had been baked for us at Lunis' Mill.35 We crossed a pretty large creek and pitched our tent two miles this side of the mill at a little creek, but we had to change its position soon, because the wind blew the smoke into the tent. We put our horses in the woods. Bro. Petersen and Merkli, who had stayed back to bake bread, came to us again late at night. They had been compelled at Lunis Mill to wade through the creek, which is pretty deep. On October 30, we had bad weather. It rained and snowed, but we kept pretty dry under our tent. Our horses had run off and some of our brethren had to search for them nearly the whole day before they found them. We were very glad when we had them again, because we had heard that many horses had been stolen in this neighborhood and the same might have happened to ours. As the brethren had become thoroughly wet and cold, we drank tea and were very happy together. We changed our tent again because of the smoke. We tried for the first time to bake our bread in the ashes. On October 31, we rose very early to start again on our journey. We soon had to climb a high mountain, which was very hard on the horses, for the ground was frozen hard and covered with snow. After a mile we came to a little creek, and after another mile to a pretty large creek, near which was a plantation. 35 This was evidently the mill of Robert Luhny, who is mentioned in the itinerary of Rev. Mr. Schnell as being on the James river. The reading which was considered doubtful (see Virginia Magazine, Vol. XII, p. 82) is corroborated by this passage. The ferry is given as "Looneys Ferry," on Fry and Jefferson's map of Virginia.

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