Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 488 [Click for larger image]Page 488

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 487 [Click for larger image]Page 487

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 485 [Click for larger image]Page 485

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 484 [Click for larger image]Page 484

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

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Published in Volume XX — 1911
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  • History – Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico & Louisiana, Dedication page 3

    Thirty-One Years of Organized Work in Oklahoma,
    Texas, New Mexico and Louisiana by
    Church of the Brethren from 1891 to 1922

    Dedication page 3 — History: Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico & Louisiana [Click for larger image] title=Dedication page 3

    DEDICATION Not that we desire to boast of achievement, because we surely have very little to boast of; not that we can say that we have produced anything entirely new, because this is only a bit more history of which the world is full; not that we can show any greater sacrifices than hundreds of faithful men and women have made in the ages that have passed since the dawn of the Christian Era, but we believe that there have been worthy men and women in these districts whose sacrifices may be an inpiration to others to offer themselves without reserve to the Lord's work. Not that other sects have not done anything in this needy field, because ihey have been there and possibly as conscientious as we; not that we were there before they were, or had any claim to precedence; not that we think their history would not be interesting, but that we desire to relieve ourselves of responsibility by doing our part in this great field and we desire to record these feats to spur others on to greater activity, and take possession of the field in the name of Jesus Christ our Savior and King. As a testimony to the work that has been accomplished by these men and women who have come and given their time and money and some of them, their lives, we, as a committee appointed by the Mission Boards of the Districts, desire to dedicate this brief history of these two Districts for the thirty-one years since they have been organized.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 316

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 316 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 316

    IV, page 2404, in which place may be found a fair and discriminating account of the several sects in question: "The Tunkers are often confounded with the other peace sects, in Pennsylvania, of German origin, especially with the Mennonites, the Amish, Schwenckfelders, etc.; but they have no historical connection, and differ from them in some important particulars." Another quotation from Schaft-Harzog, Vol. IV, page 2403, may be allowed as fairly describing the Ephrata Society (the particular sect of Sieben-taeger with which we are here concerned): "The Sieben-Taeger, or German Seventh-day Baptists, are a secession from the Tunkers. They are now [1883], nearly extinct as a denomination, but at one time existed in considerable numbers at Ephrata, Lancaster county, Penn., where, under Conrad Beissel. they formed a monastic community in 1732; and colonies were afterward formed near York, Bedford and Snow Hill. Beissel, a native of Germany, came to this country in 1720, and settled at Mill Creek, where he was baptized by Peter Becker, the Tunker minister of the Germantown church, in 1725. He published a pamphlet protesting against the change of the sabbath from the seventh to the first day of the week, and also advocating celibacy as the higher order of Christian life." It was earlier than 1732, however, probably 1728, that Beissel, who had been baptized by the Dunker bishop, Peter Becker, in 1724, began the movement which formed the Ephrata Society. Community of goods was at first the rule at Ephrata, but was afterwards abandoned, at least in part. Celibacy was enjoined upon those who retired to the cloisters, and was recommended to others, but was not required of them. They adopted a garb similar to that of the Capuchins, and assumed, upon entering the order, monastic names. Having now succeeded, I trust, in setting the Dunkers clearly apart—showing what and who they are not—I have only left to tell, generally and briefly, who and what they are. The Dunkers (Brethren, or German Baptist Brethreh), are a large body of Christians, living chiefly in Pennsylvania, Maryland. Virginia, West Virginia. Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, and California, with branch congregations and missons in Canada, Sweden, Norway, France, Switzerland, Asia Minor and India. They hold the Bible as the Word of God, and the New Testament as their creed. In faith they are orthordox and evangelical. They believe in the Trinity of the Godhead, in the divinity of each of the three Persons, in future reward and punishments. Faith, repentance and baptism are held to be the conditions of forgiveness of sin and the gift of the Holy Ghost. They administer baptism by trine, face-forward, immersion. They perpetuate the Apostolic agape, or

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 370

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 370 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 370

    MORAVIAN DIARIES OF TRAVELS THROUGH VIRGINIA. Edited by Rev. WILLIAM J. HINKE anid CHARLES E. KEMPER. (CONTINUED.) EXTRACTS FROM THE DIARY OF LEONHARD SCHNELL AND ROBERT HUSSEY,* OF THEIR JOURNEY TO GEORGIA, NOVEMBER 6, 1743-APRIL 10, 17444† On November 6th, new style, Bro. Hussey and I went from our dear congregation at Bethlehem to Philadelphia, where we stayed to the 11th, to be commissioned by the Brethren to our work. Bro. Hussey and I agreed, in a hearty conversation, to journey together in love and in the strength of the Lamb. We lodged eight miles from Philadelphia in an English inn. On the 12th, I spoke with a man whom we met on the road. He knew us to be Moravians. He said that he was anxious to visit Bethlehem. I gave him an English catechism and a "Fellow Traveller."‡ On the 13th, towards evening, we came to Lancaster. I * Robert Hussey, from Wiltshire, England. In 1749, teacher of the Moravian school in Oley, Pa. Died in Bethlehem, July, 1775. See Register of Moravians, p. 50. † The editors are under special obligation to the authorities in Bethlehem, especially to the courteous archivist, Mr. Robert Rau, for the loan of the original MS., which has made it possible to present this important diary in a much completer form than was originally intended. The original covers fifty-one closely-written pages. As it would have been impossible to present the full text in one issue of the Magazine, most of the conversations were abbreviated and many reflections of the pious missionaries were excluded, but no statements were omitted which in any way throw light on the condition of the Germans in the States through which the missionaries traveled. ‡ This English catechism bears the following title: "A short Catechism for some Congregations of Jesus, of the Reformed Religion in Pennsylvania, etc. First published in German by John Bechtel. Philadelphia, 1742." The "Fellow Traveler " was not an American publication. It must have been published in England.

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