Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

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Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

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Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
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Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
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Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
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Published in Volume XX — 1911

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Published in Volume XX — 1911

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 374

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 374 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 374

    He was the first settler there. He was very courteous when he heard that I was a minister. I asked him for the way to Carolina. He told me of one, which runs for 150 miles through Irish settlements, the district being known as the Irish tract. I had no desire to take this way, and as no one could tell me the right way I felt somewhat depressed. I asked the Lord to show me the right way, but slept little that night.* On the 21st, immediately after arising, one of the servants came to me and told me that two miles from there a man lived, who could tell me the right way. I went to him. He was very kind and quite willing to tell me the way. His name is Stephan Schmidt,† a Catholic, but hungry to hear the word of the cross. Many spiritually hungry people, of German nationality, live there, who have no minister. I bade him farewell and went magazine. Rev. Mr. Schnell again visited him in 1749, as shown in the October number, 1903, of the Magazine. Kercheval, in his History of the Valley, makes many references to him, always spelling his name Joist Hite. His real name was Jost (Joseph) Heydt, which fact is attested by many of his deeds recorded in the county clerk's office of Frederick county, Va. He was careless as to the correct spelling of his surname, and it is stated upon the authority of one of his descendants that he spelled it in three different ways on the same day in the execution of three deeds. He was not, as has been so persistently claimed in recent years, the first white settler in the Valley of Virginia. Adam Mueller (Miller) had lived for fifteen years on the South Branch of the Shenandoah when naturalized by Governor Gooch on March 13, 1741-2, which proves, beyond question, that he located there either in 1726 or 1727, while Hite, according to Kercheval, made his settlement on the Opequon, about five miles south of Winchester, Va., in 1732. As to the settlement of Miller, see William and Mary College Quarterly, Vol. IX, No. 2, p. 132; also Vol. X, No. 1, p. 84, and Vol. XI, No. 2, p. 127, Virginia Magazine of History and Biography. As to Hite, see Kercheval's History of the Valley, p. 41, et seq. * The way indicated to the missionary would have led him through the present counties of Rockingham, Augusta, Rockbridge and Botetourt, then, in the fullest sense of the term, the land of the Scotch-Irish. Why an inoffensive missionary should have dreaded the prospect of a journey through their country, is a question to be answered by the historians of that race. † He is also mentioned in Schnell's diary of 1749. See Virginia Magazine, Vol. XI, p. 129.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 71

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 71 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 71

    which way I had come. Towards ten o'clock I began to ascend the mountain and at three o'clock in the afternoon I had reached the other side and four miles farther on the first German houses. I resolved not to lodge with the people, but with the minister himself. I arrived at his house late in the evening when it was already dark. He received me with much love and courtesy. He asked me if I were a minister. I said: "Yes." Whence I came? "From Virginia." Where I resided? "At Bethlehem on the forks of the Delaware." Oh, he said, where the Moravians live. "But," he said, "they have no permission to preach in this country or to travel among the people." I answered him: "My dear sir, I am a minister of the gospel and I preach the free grace of God through the blood of Christ for the forgiveness of sins just as much as the Lutherans. I have never seen Moravia, but if it pleases any one to call me a Moravian, I let him do so. With regard to the proclamation of the Governor, for whom I have due respect, I am compelled to believe that he does not know us and that we are mentioned in the proclamation through a misunderstanding, because he confuses us and considers us one with the New Lights or Whitefieldians. For I cannot believe that the Governor, being dependent upon King and Parliament, can subject those people, whom the King wishes to be treated as his born subjects in all his lands, to imprisonment or similar harsh treatment. As a minister of the gospel I enjoy, according to the act of Parliament, all the liberties and privileges of a minister of the church of England." I then showed him the printed act of Parliament, and after he had read it he did not mention this subject any more, but we began to speak at once of other matters. In this conversation he did not only show no bitterness, animosity or desire to disputation, as such people usually do, but was so courteous that we were able to converse very intelligently. On Sunday, April 7-March 27, early in the morning, I conversed with Rev. Mr. Klug.33 After that we went to church. Be- 33 Rev. Mr. Klug visited Muhlenberg in June, 1749, who writes as follows about him: "In the month of June Rev. Mr. Klug visited us, who for several years has officiated in a German Evangelical congregation in Virginia. From that land, which is also called Spotsylvania, several Germans, among whom was also one named Stoever, collected money

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 241

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 241 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 241

    famous Mosheim,* whom Bro. Gottschalk also visited, and who received him with much love. His predecessor was the father of the well-known Stoever.† He was not at home, but had gone to Williamsburg to take his tobacco, which is part of his salary, to the market. The people there asked Bro. Joseph to preach for them, but he refused because the minister was not at home, and without his knowledge and consent he would not preach. Very modest and nice people live there; with four of them they became more fully acquainted. One of them said he would visit us, together with Rev. Mr. Klug, at Bethlehem. On July 30th, they came, towards evening, to the Licken Run [Licking Run], or Germantown, where they lodged with an old friend by the name of Holzklau. The little village is settled with Reformed miners from Nassau-Siegen.‡ They live very quietly together and are nice people. *John Lorenz Mosheim was a famous historian and theologian (1693-1755), professor in Kiel, Helmstadt and Goettingen. He is best known through his extensive church history. † On September 11 , 1728, there arrived in Philadelphia Johann Caspar Stoever, Sr., Missionaire, and Johann Caspar Stoever, S. S. Theo. Stud. The latter remained in Pennsylvania and was instrumental in founding many Lutheran churches. The former went to Madison county, Virginia, in 1733. The relation of these two men has long been a problem to Lutheran historians. Neither the editors of the "Hallesche Nachrichten" nor the last prominent Lutheran historian (Rev. T. E. Schmauk, in Lutheran Church in Pennsylvania, 1902, in Vol. XI, of Proceedings of the Pennsylvania German Society, p. 245) were able to shed any light on this subject. The statement of this diary settles this vexed quest ion definitely by informing us that the Virginia missionary was the father of the younger Stoever who labored in Pennsylvania. ‡ This statement dispels all doubts and conjectures as to the nativity of the first German settlers at Germanna. Bishop Meade, in his Old Churches and Families of Virginia, Vol. II, pp. 74-76. and Dr. Slaughter, in his History of St. Mark's Parish, pp. 42-45, give interesting accounts of these people, but their statements are to some extent inaccurate. Dr. Slaughter, especially, was in error when hazarding the conjecture that they were a remnant of the German settlement at Newbern, North Carolina, which escaped to Virginia after the Indian massacre at that place in 1711, and, unfortunately, later writers have adopted his theory as a fact. As shown by these diaries and as stated in a previous note, Germantown, Fauquier, was settled by colonists from Nassau-Siegen, Westphalia, Germany. The house built by Tillman

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