Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 488 [Click for larger image]Page 488

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 487 [Click for larger image]Page 487

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 485 [Click for larger image]Page 485

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 484 [Click for larger image]Page 484

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 483 [Click for larger image]Page 483

Published in Volume XX — 1911
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Recently Added

  • History – Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico & Louisiana, page 8

    Thirty-One Years of Organized Work in Oklahoma,
    Texas, New Mexico and Louisiana by
    Church of the Brethren from 1891 to 1922

    page 8 — History: Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico & Louisiana [Click for larger image] title=page 8

    Another phase of the church work in these states, is the prcatice of the ordinances by different individuals and how they are viewed by others. Some ordinances that were properly observed were viewed with interest and many were much benefitted and some of the spectators later were partIcipants. One young man who took his Testament and followed the ordinance of feet-washing, remarked, "It is there, that way." Later he was among the participants. One man said to me one day. When I used to live in Indiana I would attend your "Barbecues." (Referring to those communion occasions where we had two or three days meeting and furnished meals to all who came). Another place in the observance of the salutation, we were very closely watched and I learned of another body of religious enthusiasts who tried to observe that ordinance without regard to sex. That sort of observance caused troubles between husband and wife and in a few instances homes were broken up. They were called the "Kissing Bugs." Our observance of the ordinance was with some difficulty in that community. The ordinance of baptism is variously viewed and practiced. In a certain community where we had preached baptism as hard as we could, one friend who was not yet initiated into church fellowship, decided that the three dips were all right but he wanted it backward and his minister did it for him. These people who act as tho they could live above sin are closely watched and sometimes found to be like other well-meaning mortals. Sometimes they have been severely tested and didn't stand the test.

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 275

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 275 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 275

    tent in the swamp. In spite of all trouble and labor we had only traveled ten miles. On November 7, we started at daybreak and got out of the swamp. We had to climb a mountain, which was very precipitous on the other side. Having crossed we forded a pretty large creek. Then the way was up hill again, and we had much trouble before we reached the top, because the ground was slippery so that the horses could not step firmly. Then we had a good road for a mile, whereupon it turned again into a swamp and crossed a creek several times. Our wagon was somewhat damaged, because the banks of a creek were so steep and the wagon went down so deep that the rear part struck the ground, and one of the boards of the wagon bed was broken. We repaired this very quickly and then ate dinner at the creek. Bro. Loesch went ahead to reconnoiter. Immediately before us was a very steep hill, followed by a pretty long mountain. From the top of it we could see Pilot Mountain in North Carolina, and we were glad that we should very soon see the Carolinian boundary and enter upon our land. For a mile we drove on the mountain, then the road turned down very precipitously. At the foot of the mountain we crossed a large creek with very steep banks, and finally came to the Smith River. We drove for a mile over a beautiful low land where there were many grapes, which tasted very well. Bro. Gottlob rode ahead for several miles to inquire about the way. We came to a mountain which we intended to cross to-night. We tried as best we could, but we did not succeed, the mountain being too steep. We pitched our tent at the foot of the mountain, close to the river. Several brethren took our horses to a pasture, half a mile away, and stayed with them during the night. On November 8, at daybreak, we continued our journey. We carried half of our baggage to the top of the mountain. Then we brought up the wagon, but experienced much difficulty, before we succeeded in doing so, because the way was very steep. Having reached the summit we loaded our baggage in the wagon again, and thus descended. Down in the valley we passed over a little creek, but immediately afterwards had to cross a second mountain. We had to unload again and carried most of our baggage to the top. It is the steepest of all the mountains

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