Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 488 [Click for larger image]Page 488

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 487 [Click for larger image]Page 487

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 485 [Click for larger image]Page 485

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 484 [Click for larger image]Page 484

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 483 [Click for larger image]Page 483

Published in Volume XX — 1911
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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 314

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 314 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 314

    happy hereafter, but first must pass through punishment according to their Sins." Dr. Walker here has fallen into a mass of confusion that had doubtless bewildered other men before him, and that certainly has blinded hundreds to the truth since his day; and it is to make another effort, in behalf of justice and historical truth, to clear up this confusion, that I beg space for these lines. The facts in brief are these: The Ephrata Society, who were an offshoot of the Dnnker sect, were Sabbatarians and ascetics; yet they retained a few of the principles and practices of the parent body. Often, therefore, they were called Dunkers; often, on the other hand, through a similar lack of discrimination, the Dunkers were confused with the Slbbatarians, and, in consequence, charged with their ascetic practices and heretical doctrines. These misconceptions have clung to the subject with the characteristic persistency of error, from generation to generation, and even in our own day are by no means entirely dispelled. In the realm of fiction they have found a congenial atmosphere; and even in sober history they have taken deep root. Howe, the historian, whose book, Virginia: Its History and Antiquities, is eagerly sought after and highly prized by students and librarians of to-day, wrote a hundred years after Dr. Walker; yet he follows the same wrong path. Indeed, he gets far further into the maze of error, and he is probably still leading multitudes after him. In his sketch of Botetourt county (page 203), he says: "At the small village of Amsterdam, 5 miles s. of Fincastle, there is a large brick church, lately built by the Dunkards The Dunkers at Amsterdam are descendants of Germans who emigrated to Pennsylvania. The following, regarding the tenets and practices of this sect, is from a published account: " 'The Tunkers are a denomination of Seventh-Day Baptists, which took its rise in the year 1724. [The Tunker sect originated in Germany in 1708. Beissel, who afterwards founded the monastic sect, was baptized by a Tunker bishop, near Philadelphia, in 1724.] It was founded by a German, who, weary of the world, retired to an agreeable solitude within sixty miles of Philadelphia, for the more free exercise of religious contemplation. Curiosity attracted followers, and his simple and engaging manners made them proselytes. They soon settled a little colony, called Ephrata, in allusion to the Hebrews, who used to sing psalms on the border of the river Euphrates. This denomination seem to have obtained their name from their baptizing their new converts by plunging. [The terms Tunker and Dunker did arise from the mode of baptizing by immersion, or dipping, frem Ger. tunken, to dip.] * * They use trine immersion, with laying on the hands and prayer, even when the person baptized is in the water. [This is true of the Dun

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 255

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 255 [Click for larger image]Page 255

    THE CINCINNATI MUNICIPAL ELECTION OF 1828. MARY BAKER FURNESS, CINCINNATI. Cincinnati began its existence as a city under its first charter, March 1, 1819. By an act of the General Assembly passed January 26, 1827, a new charter was granted, which superseded the old one, and did away with all the legislation which had been enacted under it. According to this second charter, the city boundaries began with the "Ohio River, at the east corner of partial section No. 12, running west with the township line of Cincinnati to Mill Creek, then down Mill Creek with its meanders to the Ohio River, then eastwardly up said river with the southern boundary of the State of Ohio, to the place of beginning." The city area was coterminous with that of the township of Cincinnati. The northern boundary, as nearly as I can determine, was the line of Liberty Street extended to the Ohio on the east. The chief municipal officers under the second charter were, the mayor, elected biennially, and three trustees from each ward, who formed the council. The city was divided into four wards by two lines crossing at right angles, Third Street running east and west, Main Street running north and south. The First Ward was in the northeast, the Second in the northwest, the Third in the southeast and the Fourth in the southwest. March 2, 1827, by virtue of powers vested in them by the charter the council divided the Second Ward by an east and west line from Main Street a long Sixth to the corporation line. That portion north of Sixth and west of Main was the Fifth Ward. On March 21, 1827, the boundaries of the Third and First Ward were changed, by an east and west line, which "began on Main at the intersection of Third, and ran eastwardly along the center of Third to Ludlow, thence eastwardly along the center of Symmes to High, and along the center of High to a point on the street bearing north 16° from the center of the cupola of David Kilgour's house near the reservoir, and by the

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  • Elder Samuel Murray Autobiography, page 1

    A Short Autobiography of Elder Samuel Murray: A Few Incidence and Facts of My First Work in the Ministry in Indiana. Also a Few Facts of My More General Work in the Ministry.

    Page 1 — Elder Samuel Murray Autobiography  [Click for larger image]Page 1

    Autobiography of Elder Samuel Muray. At the request of many friends, and for the benefit of future generations of our family, I write these few facts concerning my life and my ancestors. Our family stock is Scotch-irish; My grandfather, Daniel Murray, came to this country as a British soldier during the Revolutionary war. At some time during that war he escaped from the British service and joined the American army. At the close of the war he settled in Pennsylvania or New Jersey. He had four sons and one daughter. The daughter, Catharine (or aunt Katie as I knew her,) married a man by the name of Taylor. They had one son and one daughter. The union proved unfortunate, for they separated; aunt Katie and her husband lived for some time with my mother in Ohio. The daughter married Daniel Martin. The son also came from Penn. to Ohio, married and lived in the northern part of the state. I remember him because of a very remarkable occurrance, that of a quadruple birth by his wife. She gave birth to four well developed children three of which lived. Grandfather lived to be quite old and for some time lived with my mother. He used to knit stockings for sale; he died a poor man. He probably made no profession of religion. I remember of hearing him at one time when he was quite old and childish, repeat that child’s prayer, “Now I lay me down to sleep.” He never tired of telling about the feats of physical strength and valor that he had performed. He was tall and evidently a very powerful man at his best. His four sons, were John, David, Thom­as, and Daniel. Uncle David, lived in Huntingdon Co. Pa., and had a large family of children. I remember the names of only two of his sons, Daniel, and Jacob, nearly the age of myself and my brother David. The last word we had from them

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