Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 488 [Click for larger image]Page 488

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 487 [Click for larger image]Page 487

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 485 [Click for larger image]Page 485

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 484 [Click for larger image]Page 484

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 483 [Click for larger image]Page 483

Published in Volume XX — 1911
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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 371

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 371 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 371

    called on Jacob Mueller, who married the sister of Bro. Suessholz. But I found that I was not as welcome as formerly. Hence I left and went to William Ziegler, who moved to this place from Philadelphia. He received us kindly and showed us much love. On the 14th, we crossed the Susquehanna River. John Ride took us over. When it became dark we could find no house. But we heard a dog bark. We followed the sound, but soon found ourselves in a swamp. We extricated ourselves with much difficulty. The people whom we met were Germans. They gave us a lodging at our request. On the 15th, we came to the little town, New York [York, in York Co., Pa.], where all the inhabitants are High Germans. The name of the innkeeper, with whom we took breakfast, is George Schwab. In answer to a number of questions, he said: "You are certainly Zinzendorfians." I answered: "I do not understand your meaning. I am a Lutheran minister, but no Zinzendorfian." He said: "You are going about everywhere through the country to preach, will you not give us a sermon, for we have long wished to hear one of you?" As I did not refuse, they immediately went about through the little town, from house to house, and announced a serrnon. I preached to them soon afterwards on the text: "The Son of Man is come to seek and to save that which is lost." They asked me to come again to them. Only every four weeks a Lutheran minister* comes to them and preaches for them. A shoemaker, who is single, asked me whether he should go on a privateer ship. The Catholic minister had advised him to do so. I made use of the opportunity to speak to his heart. Towards evening we came to the district which is called after the river "Canawage " [Conewago, Adams Co., Pa.]. We lodged in an inn. The name of * The first trace of a Lutheran congregation at York appears in the year 1733. Its first pastor was John Caspar Stoever. In 1743 the congregation was served by David Candler. See Hallesche Nachrichten, new ed., Vol. I., pp. 563-565. The Reformed congregation goes back to the year 1744. In that year a call was extended to the Rev. Jacob Lischy, who settled in York in September, 1745. See Fathers of the Reformed Church, Vol. I, p. 354.

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 133

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 133 [Click for larger image]Page 133

    scnption of the Western Country given by Generals Putnam and Tupper & others, it appearing expedient to form a settlement there, a Motion was made for chusing a Committee to prepare the Draught or Plan of an Association into a Company for the said Purpose, for the Inspection and Appropriation of this Convention — Resolved in the Affirmative. — Also Resolved that this Committee shall consist of five. — General Putnam, Mr. Cutler — Col. Brooks, Major Sargent & Capt. Cushing were elected. — Adjourned to half after 3 o'clock, Thursday. — The officers of the societies interested in these anniversary meetings include President G. Stanley Hall, Clark University, Worcester, president of the Rufus Putnam Memorial Association; Hon. Whitelaw Reid, president of the Ohio Company of Associates of New York, and Professor Archer Butler Hulbert of Marietta College. Professor Hulbert will be a guest at the annual banquet of the Massachusetts Society of the Sons of the Revolution, Jan. 17, when he will speak on "Rufus Putnam." 'WILLIAM HENRY RICE — IN MEMORIAM. William Henry Rice, for many years a Life Member of the Ohio State Archæological and Historical Society, and for seven years previous to last May, a Trustee of the Society, died in South Bethlehem, Pa., January 10, 1911. For the main facts of his active and resultful life we are indebted to Professor W. N. Schwarze of the Moravian College, Bethlehem, Pa. William Henry Rice sprang from heroic, pioneer Moravian stock. He was a direct descendant of the noble missionary among the Indians, the Rev. John Heckewelder. He was the son of the late James Alexander and Josephine Charlotte Seibert Rice and was born in Bethlehem, Pa., on September 8, 1840. After receiving his early education in the Moravian Parochial School of Bethlehem, he entered Yale College as a member of the class of 1859. From this institution he was graduated with distinction, and after spending a short time teaching, he entered Yale Theological Seminary. In his middle year at this institution he joined the Union Army and was chosen Chaplain of the 129th Pennsylvania Infantry, in which were many of his friends from Bethlehem. Dr. Rice never tired of relating his army experiences and on every possible occasion used what eloquence he could command to fire the enthusiasm and patriotism of his fellow countrymen. Wm. H. Rice.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 229

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 229 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 229

    V. MISSINOTTY [MASSANUTTON]. It lies on the South Branch of the "Chanador," in the center, between the so-called "Missinotty" mountains and the Blue Ridge. It is a narrow. small and oblong district, which can easily be viewed in its entirety frum the mountains.* Many Germans live there. Most of them are "Mennisten" [Mennonites], who are in a bad condition.† Nearly all religious earnestness and zeal is extinguished among them. Besides them, a few church people live there, partly Lutheran, partly Refurmed. The Rev. Mr. Klug visits them occasionally. It is, so to say, one of his branch congregations [preaching stations]. He preaches and administers also the Lord's Supper to them. They do not want to hear the preaching of the brethren at this place. A man lives there by the name of Matthias Selzer, the son-in-law of Jacob Beyerly, of Lancaster. This man is highly respected in the whole region, because he is rich and often helps the people in their need. He has considerable influence among them, but he is a bitter enemy of the brethren. As a result, all the others are not just our friends. VI. THE UPPER GERMANS.‡ They live behind [east of] the Blue mountains, about thirty miles from "Missinotty," in a straight line, otherwise it may be *This statement clearly implies that the entire section of country now known as the Page Valley was originally known as Massanutton, and that the term is not to be understood as meaning a single settlement in one particular neighborhood. This fact may be of value in future discussions as to the exact location of the first white settlement in the Valley of Virginia. † The Mennonites are followers of Menno Simons (149--1559). They are a somewhat primitive people in their manners and customs, being non-combatants and abstaining almost entirely from participation in public affairs. While not numerous, congregations of this denomination are still to be found in Rockingham, Shenandoah and Page. ‡ This settlement was composed of German Lutherans, the second colony to locate at or near Germanna. They came in 1717 and consisted of twenty families numbering about eighty persons. The third colony came at some time between 1717 and 1720 and numbered forty families. These colonists removed from Germanna prior to the year 1724 and

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