Thursday, 02 January 2014 07:30

Discussion #2

This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

Published in Research Blog
Monday, 30 December 2013 07:15

Discussion #1

Today’s blog, the first in a series that will hopefully be an on-going explanation of what I am presently working on, is about the various Brethren Miller families who were early settlers of Montgomery county, Ohio.  The opening section below is some comments about the Miller families of note, followed by what I am working on at this time.  In essence there are three Miller families that interest me, and I am not even remotely related to any of them, so, to that end, here goes.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 317

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 317 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 317

    love-feast, in connection with the communion by bread and wine; and with these sacred rites is joined the service of feet-washing, following the example of Christ as outlined in St. John, 13th chapter. The Dunkers combat pride, and practice plainness of dress. They endeavor to avoid law suits, and teach peace in personal as well as national relations; they oppose secret, oath-bound societies, divorce, slavery and intemperance. At certain periods in their history they have opposed higher education; but the organizers of the sect were educated men, and at present they own and operate ten or a dozen colleges in the United States. For authentic accounts of the Dunkers in brief, I would refer the reader to (1) The New International Enclycopaedia (Dodd, Meade & Co.), Vol. VIII, pp. 273. 274; (2) The Schaff-Herzog Enclycopaedia of Re/igious Knowledge, Vol. IV, pp. 2401-2404. For similar accounts of the Sieben-Taeger, see the latter of the two references just given; also New Int. Encyc., Vol. II, pp. 459, 460. For authentic and complete accounts of the Dunkers, and in their connection, yet in their distinction, of the Sieben-Taeger, also see (1) The History of tile German Baptist Brethren, by George N. Falkenstein. Germantown, Penn.; (2) The History of the Brethrm, by Dr. M. G. Brumbaugh, published by the Brethren Publishing House, Elgin, Ill. JOHN WALTER WAYLAND. TOMB OF MRS. URSULA (BYRD) BEYER LEY. Some years prior to the Civil War the tomb of Usurla, daughter of William Byrd (1st) and wife of Robert Beverley, the historian, remained in the churchyard at Jamestown, almost intact. A visitor fortunately copied the epitaph and sent it to a newspaper. It is as follows: [Arms.] .. Here lyeth the body of Ursula Beverley late wife of Robert Beverley, daughter of ye Hon'ble Col. William Byrd, who departed this life the last day of October 1698, being much lamented of all that knew her. Aged 16 years, 11 months and 2 daies." During the years immediately preceding the war the tomb was mutilated, and about 1861 only a piece containing the arms was left. Dr. Frank Hall, a Confederate soldier, while doing sentry duty in the churchyard, made on July 1, 1861, a sketch of the fragment. We are indebted to Miss Jane Chapman Slaughter for the copy of the drawing published in this number of the Magazine, and for information of its existence.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 122

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 122 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 122

    On November 13th, we started early. A German woman gave us a piece of bread and cheese for the way. A man who traveled our way to-day was of much assistance to us, as we had no house for twenty miles. Moreover, the forest was very dense, and it was difficult to find the way. To-day we came to the source of the South Fork* and, although we had to cross the water more than thirty times. (the people had urgently warned us not to take this road as we had no horse), yet the Lamb helped us safely through all difficulties. In the evening we lodged in an English cabin (thus they call the English houses there). It was quite cold. But the bear skins upon which we rested and the fire before us which kept us warm, rendered us good services. We had yet a piece of bread left, and as the people had none, we divided it with them. They gave us some of their bear meat, which can be found in every house in this district. On November 14th. we went on our way with a happy feeling. We had to wade through the water frequently. We stayed with a Welshman over night, but he did not trust us very much. We engaged him to take us through the river with his horse, because it is quite large; it is called "Kauh Pastert."† On November 15th, we traveled in the company of a Welshman, George Luys; he took us twelve times through the river [Clover Creek, Highland County]. Traveling was difficult to-day, for we had to cross rather high mountains, and, moreover it rained. Night overtook us before we reached a house and had passed through the water. At last we could no longer see the way and had to stay wht!re we were. Fortunately. we found a little hut, in which no one was at home. Here we stayed. thanking God for the shelter. We made fire, and after drying our clothes we * The South Fork of the South Branch rises in the extreme southern portion of Pendleton county, West Virginia. † Cow Pasture River. The missionaries were then within the limits of the present county of Highland. and probably reached the James River in the vicinity of Clifton Forge. From there the missionaries seem to have followed the road to Fincastle, Botetourt county, to Salem, Roanoke county, to Christiansburg, Montgomery county, and finally to the neighborhood of Newbern, in Pulaski county.

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

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