Thursday, 02 January 2014 07:30

Discussion #2

This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 380

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 380 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 380

    the way in order to hear us. He insisted that I should visit him on my return. I gave him a catechism and a "Fellow Traveller." At evening we passed "Cuschland" [Goochland] Court House, and, after half a mile, we came to the large James River. We were taken across and remained over night in the first house, with Jacob Mischer,* a Quaker, who expressed his surprise that, as a minister, I had undertaken such a long journey in such a poor style, without a horse. On the 29th, we passed the Etmerkt [Appomattox] River. A short time before a traveler had been killed on the road we were traveling on. After journeying twenty miles we found a house, where we intended to take breakfast and dinner, but the people had neither flour nor bread in the house. Hence they roasted us some potatoes. We then passed "Amili" [Amelia] Court House. When we asked for lodging in the evening, the people would not receive us, although it was dark and it rained. A Scotchman, who noticed that we were strangers, advised us to go to a house two miles out of our way, where we would be received. It was so. We were overcome with the thought of the faithfulness of the Saviour. On the 30th, we lost our way several times. We had to pass two rivers; the one was called "Notawe " [Nottoway], through which we had to swim. We lodged in an English inn. On Sunday, December 1st, we came to "Brownschweig" [Brunswick‡] Court House. We were shown a road, running northeast, but I did not have the courage to follow it. We went, therefore, in a straight southerly direction, as nobody was able to show us the right way. In the afternoon we crossed the river Mohaery [Meherrin], across which leads a large bridge. We * This was, perhaps, Jacob Michaux, of a well-known Huguenot family, who lived near the place the river was crossed. The Michauxs still live in sight of the river, opposite Goochland Courthouse. † The name of this river is very inaccurately reproduced by Schnell, but as the Appomattox is the only important river between Goochland Courthouse and Amelia Courthouse, the identification can harcdly be questioned. ‡ Brunswick Courthouse is marked on Fry and Jefferson's map at about the place where Lawrenceville, the present county seat, is niow located. This

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 272

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 272 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 272

    whom we met whether we could cross the mountain to-day. He said: Yes, and told us that some one was living on the mountain with whom we could have an opportunity to stay over night. We believed it and drove to the mountain, but had to pass a large creek1 on the way. Then we tried whether we could ascend the mountain, but it was inmpossible because the foot of the mountain was too steep. We concluded therefore to unload and carry our baggage [on horseback] up on the mountain. Bro. Lischer and Pfeil stayed with the wagon, the rest went up the mountain. Wheni we had covered half of the way it began to rain. It was also difficult for our horses, but we hoped to find the house on top of the mountain, of which the man had spoken. It took us a long time to ascend and when we finally reached the top no house nor water could be found. We were therefore compelled also to descend the mountain, although it was very dark and rained fast. Finally after many vain wishes we reached a little creek in the valley. It had taken us two and a half hours to cross this mountain.2 We then camped, as well as we could, but experienced much difficulty in starting a fire, for it rained very fast and everything was wet. We raised our tent and lay down upon the wet blankets. Here we rested for a while. To-wards morning it cleared and became very cold. On November 3, we went very early back across the mountain to get the rest of the baggage and the wagon. Bro. Gottlob, Nathanael and Kalberland meanwhile stayed with the tent. The brethren who had remained with the wagon also had had a cold night, and we were glad to see them again. We put our baggage once more on our horses and then carried most of our things to the top of the mountain. Here we made a fire and Bro. Haberland staved there. The rest of the brethren went back again to bring up the wagon, which was pretty empty. But we had to push very hard to get the wagon up. After an hour and a half we reached the top safely. After we had loaded the wagon again we drove up hill for a short distance. 1 This large creek is probably Back creek, which is due south of the Roanoke River. 2 This mountain, which gave the Moravian travelers so much trouble, was no doubt the Blue Ridge, which they crossed at Magotty Gap.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 378

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 378 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 378

    district thought of him. They answered: "Not very much." Rev. Mr. Rieger had said that he was a good Evangelical minister, who did not try to draw any one away from his religion, and that he preached the word pure and undefiled to all who wanted to hear him. They also told me that a man by the name of Matthew Hoffmann lives at Bethlehem, who had written several letters to his brother, living ten miles from there.* He had brought the letters to him [the schoolmaster] to read them to him, because he feared that his brother had fallen away froin the true religion. The schoolmaster had then read the letters, but liked them very well. In the evening I visited an elder, at whose place all his neighbors again came together, when they heard that I was there. I spoke to them of the death of the Lamb. On Monday, the 25th, before we left, five women came, who showed us much kindness. We then took leave, being very grateful. The schoolmaster, "Holzkloh," accompanied us part of the way, and gave me a letter to a Reformed elder in Carolina, to whom he recommended me most heartily. Taking leave he asked us urgently to come again and stay several weeks. We had nothing but rain all day, and passed a creek, which was dangerous becatise of its rocks and holes. A man happened to come along, who took us over. Shortly before we had already passed a river, called "Repehennik" [Rappahannock], in a canoe. In the evening we came to a German innkeeper, Kuefer Stopfel,† called Dutch Cooper. After a while, when he heard that I was a minister, he told of an English minister‡ living in the county, who receives 16,000 pounds of tobacco as his of the Church of the United Brethren, by L. T. Reichel, Nazareth, 1888, pp. 62-68. * This statement shows that the second Reformed colony, settled at the Little Fork of the Rappahannock, and visited by Gottschalk in 1748 (see Virginia Magazine, Vol. XI, p. 232), was already in existence in 1743. † As the Anglicised name shows, the correct name of this innkeeper must have been Christopher Kuefer. ‡ This was Rev. John Thompson (see this magazine, Vol. XI, p. 232). The German minister was Rev. George Samuel Klug (see this magazine, Vol. XI, pp: 230 and 240, f).

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