Thursday, 02 January 2014 07:30

Discussion #2

This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 55

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 55 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 1 (Jul., 1904), page 55

    MORAVIAN DIARIES OF TRAVELS THROUGH VIRGINA. Edited by Rev. WILLIAM J. HINKE and CHARLES E. KEMPER. (CONTINUED) DIARY OF THE JOURNEY OF REV. L. SCHNELL AND V. HANDRUP,1 TO MARYLAND2 AND VIRGINIA, MAY 29TH TO AUGUST 4, 1747. July 6th. We were rowed over the Caneketschik3 [Conococheague] and went our way with a happy heart. But it was very hot, so that the perspiration rolled down freely. In the evening we came to the Patomik River, being very tired. We stayed with an Englishman over night. Our poor lodging place reminded us that Jesus had also lain in a stable. July 7th. Early in the morning we crossed the Patomik,4 and then crossed the mountains. At noon we came to the Hot or "Health Springs,"5 where we observed for awhile the many 1 Vitus Handrup arrived in Pennsylvania in December, 1746. In 1748 he was a member of the "Economy" at Bethleheim. Returned again to Europe. See Reincke, Register of Moravians, p. 74. 2 The first part of the journeys of these Moravian missionaries was always the same. From Bethlehem by way of Lebanon, Lancaster, York, Pa., Frederick and Hagerstown, Md., to the Potomac. See Journal of Bishop Spangenberg, Virginia Migazzne, Vol. XI, p. 235. 3 In the Special Report attached to this diary, Mr. Schnell adds the following: "Canekechick" [Conococheague], where many Lutherans and Reformed people live, who have no minister, could also be supplied [from Monocacy], for they are only a day's journey apart. I have been invited, if I should return, to preach for them." 4 It is probable that the missionaries crossed the Potomac at Watkin's Ferry, at the mouth of the Conococheague, where Williamsport is now situated. See Schnell's Diary of 1749 in Virginia Magazine, Vol. XI, p. 130, and his itinerary in the present number, also Schlatter's Journal in Life of Rev. Michael Schiatter, p. 173. 6 Now Berkeley Springs, Morgan county, West Virginia, already "famed " when visited by Washington on March 18, 1748. See Washington's .Journal of My Journey Over the Mountains. 1747-8, Albany, 1892, p. 29.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 145

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 145 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 145

    row. It was exceptionally hot to-day. Our horses were much benefited by the rest. In the evening, as we were about going to sleep, two Germans came to us who had been in the upper part of Virginia, where they had taken up land. They stayed with us over night. Their real home is at York at the "Catores " and they knew Bro. Meurer. On October 22, we started in the morning at five o'clock. Bro. Jacob Loesch went to the plantation, where our brethren are to thresh to-day. The South Mountains are three miles distant to our left.23 They are as high as the Blue Mountains when going to Gnadenhutten. There are said to be many plantations in this district, but most of them close to the mountains. We ate dinner at a small creek. The brethren returned with eleven bushels of oats. It was very warm and sultry weather. We had had no water for the last eleven miles, since leaving last night's camp. From this point to Williamsburg it is said to be two hundred miles. We went a mile and a half farther to a tavern keeper, named Severe. We inquired about the way but could not get good information. After traveling three and a half miles we found two passable roads. Bro. Gottlob and Nathanael preceded us on the left hand road. They met a woman, who informed them about the way. Then they came back to us again and we took the road to the riglht. We traveled ten miles without finding water. It was late already and we were compelled to travel five miles during the dark night. We had to climb two mountains which compelled us to push the wagon along or we could not have proceeded, for our horses were completely fagged out. Two of the brethren had to go ahead to show us the road, and thus we arrived late at Thom. Harris's plantation.24 Here we bought feed for our horses and pitched our tent a short distance from the house. The people were very friendly. They lodge strangers very willingly. 23 This is an error. It was the Massanutton range, and not the Blue Ridge or South Mountain, as stated. 24 This plantation was probably the site of the present town of Harrisonburg, Va., and Harris stands for Harrison. Thomas Harrison, son of Reuben, was the founder, in 1778, of Harrisonburg. See Waddell's Annals of Augusta County, Second Edition, 1902.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 242

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 242 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 242

    On Sunday, July 31st, Bro. Joseph preached in the forenoon in their church, and Bro. Reuz in the afternoon. Afterwards several nice and intelligent men visited Bro. Joseph. He then had an opportuuity to speak to them of the Saviour, and give them a correct idea of the congregation [at Bethlehem], because Lischy's "Declaration,"* had been circulated there. On August 1st, they continued their journey towards the "Potomack," but they lost their way and had to follow the compass northeast over hills and valleys. When night set in they were compelled to camp in the forest. On the next day they continued their former course till they found the right way, and finally came to a large plantation. But they could get nothing to satisfy their hunger, for there are very unkind people down there in Virginia. Without supper, breakfast and dinner, they continued till they reached a public house on the Goose creek, where they were able to satisfy their hunger and thirst. After resting a few hours, they again started out and traveled till 11 o'clock at night, when they came to the "Potomack," where they lodged with the ferryman. ORDERLY BOOK AND JOURNAL OF JAMES NEWELL† DURING THE POINT PLEASANT CAMPAIGN, 1774. (From the Draper Collection, Wisconsin Historical Society.) (Virginia MSS., XI.) A Copy of a Journal kept by Capt. James Newell of the expedition to Point Pleasant in the year 1774. A portion of this Weaver, one of the original Germanna colonists, in 1721, is still standing near Midland Station, Fauquier county, Virginia, and it is believed that this was the year of their removal from Gennanna to Germantown. * A publication of a former Moravian, but after 1747 a Reformed minister. See facsimile of title page in Dr. Dubbs's German Reformed Church in Pennsylvania, Lancaster, 1902, p. 126. †t We are indebted to Mr. John P. Kennedy, the newly-elected State Librarian of Virginia, for the copy of Newell's orderly book and joumal

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