Thursday, 02 January 2014 07:30

Discussion #2

This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 140

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 140 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 140

    On October 15, we started on our way at three o'clock. We had moonlight and a good road and about eighty miles to Frederickstown [Winchester]. But for twelve miles to "Shippestown", [Shippensburg]13 a little town, we had no water. Here we had our wagon fixed, because the tongue had been somewhat damaged. The blacksmith was very expensive, and the work was poorly done. We saw the Blue Mountains. about eight to ten miles to our right. We had exceptionally fine weather. Eight miles farther we came to the "Kanikatschik" [Conococheague], which is here about as large as the "Manakis" [Monocacy] at Bethlehem. Here we took our dinner. A few miles farther we stayed over night at Colonel Chimipersen's Mill,14 where we had good water. Bro. Nathanael conducted the evening worship. On October 16, Bro. Grube led the morning worship. At four o'clock we continued our journey. On the way we bought ten bushels of oats from an Irishman and after we had traveled five miles farther we breakfasted at a little creek, where Irish people have settled. Two miles farther we found good water. We traveled three miles to a house on the left, set back from the road a short distance. One mile farther we came to a tavern. We could see the Blue Mountains again very distinctly. After another mile we came to a German tavern. Here we bought some hay and took our dinner. Two miles this side of the tavern we passed the boundary of Pennsylvania and Maryland. We heard that Maryland is only six miles wide at this point. From the Susquehanna to this place mostly Irish people have settled. They have good land, but little or nothing can be bought of them. Two and a half miles farther on we came to an old Swiss settler from whom we bought some hay. He was very friendly and asked us to call again. One mile farther we came to a German, from whom we bought some cabbage, which came very handy to us. We continued for several miles and came to a place two miles this side bf the "Patomik," where we stayed 13 Shippensburg was laid out in 1749 by Edward Shippen. 14 The distance from Shippensburg proves this mill to have been Col. Chambers's mill at Chambersburg. See Scull's Map of Pennsylvania, 1759.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 279

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 279 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 279

    Haberland, who attempted to cross on a tree that was lying across the creek, fell into the water and lost his hat, but found it again soon afterwards. The road was tolerable, except a few steep hills. Every mile or two we found water. We ate our dinner seven miles beyond the "Meho" [Mayo] River on a little hill. At its foot is a creek with a rapid current. In the afternoon we passed several very steep hills, which were almost impassable, likewise several difficult banks of creeks. Towards evening it began to rain and we hurried to reach the "Ten" [Dan] River, but it became so dark that we had to stay at a creek three miles this side of the river. We kindled a fire and dried ourselves a little. It began to clear with a northwest wind. At twelve o'clock at night we started again to cross the "Ten" [Dan] River. A brother preceded the wagon with a pine torch to show us the way. At two o'clock in the night we came to the "Ten" [Dan] River. As it did not rain we thought the river would not rise very much and as a result stayed to-night on this side of the river. It turned cold and we had a little wood to burn. We were all very tired as we had driven to-day 25 miles from the "Meho" [Mayo] River to this place. On November 14, we went very early to the river to see whether we could cross, but it had risen two feet and had a very rapid current. Hence we stayed, meanwhile improving the bank leading down to the river, which was very steep. Several brethren went off hunting, but returned empty handed. The man, who lives across the river,9 visited us and asked Bro. Gottlob and Nathanael to go with him to his house, which they did. He urged Bro. Gottlob very much to baptize his child. Bro. Nathanael excused him, because he could speak but little English. But the man was not satisfied, saying he did not care how it was baptized, if it were only done. Bro. Jacob Loesch went across the river with the canoe and preceded us eleven miles, going to Mr. Altem, to order some provisions. On November 15, several brethren went off hunting, but returned again empty handed. Bro. Gottlob,and Nathanael went 9 According to an old English translation of this diary, his name was "John Carmichael, an Irishman."

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  • History – Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico & Louisiana, page 14

    Thirty-One Years of Organized Work in Oklahoma,
    Texas, New Mexico and Louisiana by
    Church of the Brethren from 1891 to 1922

    page 14 — History: Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico & Louisiana [Click for larger image] title=page 14

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