Thursday, 02 January 2014 07:30

Discussion #2

This blog entry shall deal with finalizing, almost, the lands of Elder Daniel Miller (1755-1822).  Elder Daniel owned land that today lies along the Upper Bear Creek Road of Miami township, Montgomery county, Ohio.  When he owned it, and prior to that, the land was owned by Elder Jacob Miller (ca. 1838-1815).  Normally to plat land it is fairly easy to transcribe a single deed and overlay that onto high-quality scans of the Montgomery County, Ohio Atlas of 1875.  In this instance it is difficult as that particular section, in 1875 versus the early 18th Century, had been cut up into differing tracts.  In other words, it was not easily done because of intervening deeds.  To rectify this it fell upon me to pull all the deeds, at least those that were recorded for this section, which led to some discoveries.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 137

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 137 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 137

    to see us once more. Several of the brethren visited John Tanneberger, who considered it a favor to have the brethren with him. We continued our journey, Bro. Neuser and Engel accompanying us to Xander's,7 where we arrived in the evening. As we passed over the bridge of the mill race it collapsed and it was certainly a miracle that our horses and wagon did not fall into the mill race. We thanked our dear Father for his protection. Bro. Xander was not at home, but his wife and daughter entertained us well. Bro. Neuser and Engel went home again to-night. On October 12, we rose at four o'clock and after the morning worship we breakfasted at five. At six o'clock we left. Several young men, who love the brethren, went with us part of the way and we were very happy and cheerful. After we had traveled eight miles a dead tree happened to fall on our horses, which caused considerable commotion, but it fell so neatly between the horses on the wagon tongue, that neither the brother, who rode on the horses, nor any of the horses were injured, only a piece of a collar was knocked off. This was certainly a very gracious preservation by our dear Father. To-day we shot several pheasants, quails and squirrels. In the evening we pitched the first camp in the woods, close to a creek, one mile this side of the Susquehanna. Everybody was busy in gathering wood and making fire. Bro. Erich took the cooking upon himself, and after we had eaten we spread our blankets and lay down upon them. We considered the question whether we should take father Loesch's wagon with us, because it seems that our heavy wagon cannot get along alone. But as we had not spoken about this to father Loesch, we could not conclude to do so. We appointed our night guards. Bro. Nathanael had the first two hours, he was relieved by Bro. Grube, and the gation at the Quittopahilla, settled in 1732, one mile east of the later town of Lebanon. When the Moravian movement began in Lebanon township, he became one of its main supporters. A schoolbouse was erected on his land in 1748. A church, called Hebron church, was built in 1750. See Register of Moravians, p. 125. 7 Henry Xander, a member of the Quittopahilla congregation, lived six miles west of the Hebron church. He was a miller by trade. See Alphabetical Register in Bethlehem archives.

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  • Page 2: Preface to First Edition

    Minutes of the Annual Meetings of the Brethren: 1778 - 1917

    Page 2: Preface to First Edition — Minutes of the Annual Meetings of the Brethren [Click for larger image]Page 2: Preface to First Edition

    Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1885, by JOSEPH I. COVER AND SAMUEL MURRAY, In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C.

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 126

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 126 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 2 (Oct., 1903), page 126

    evening we came to a tanner, where Bro. Brandmueller had his shoes soled. On November 29th, the shoemaker, whose wife was a zealous Presbyterian, told us that some time ago he had read a printed sermon about us, and he had hardly ever read a clearer sermon. As we were somewhat delayed by the shoemaker, we did not make much of a trip to-day. In the evening we arrived at the James River, where we stayed over night in a house about two miles from the river. The lady of the house told us about the flood; that she and two of her children were lifted up by the water in the bed in which they slept and were carried about on the bed while asleep, until they woke up. On November 30th, we heard early the frequent howling of wolves as we passed over the James River. We had to travel about thirty miles to-day, finding but few houses and no bread. Towards evening we had to cross the two northern branches of the James River. At night we came to an Irishman [N. Bell] who cared for our necessities. On December 1st, we passed confidently and safely through the Irish settlement.* On December 2nd, we continued our journey the whole day, because we wished to be with the Germans on Sunday. Once we lost our way. But our desire to preach to-morrow strengthened us in our journey. In the evening we attempted to hire a man to go with us part of the way, but none was willing. We continued for a time down the Tschanator [Shenandoah] and arrived rather late at the house of the sons of the old Stopfel [Christopher] Franciscus,† who kept us over night. On Sunday, December 3rd, the young Franciscus went very early with us to show us the way to Matthias Schaub, who, immediately on my offer to preach for them, sent messengers through the neighborhood to announce my sermon. In a short * The Scotch-Irish settlement in Augusta county.† Christopher Frandscus was, in 1751, a resident of Pennsylvania, and in that year conveyed to Gabriel Jones, the King's attorney for Augusta County, 244 acres of land on the north side of the Shenandoah River. This land was a portion of the splendid estate belonging to the late Jacob Strayer, Esq., who resided about three miles below the present village of Port Republic, in Rockingham county.

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