Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 488 [Click for larger image]Page 488

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 487 [Click for larger image]Page 487

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 485 [Click for larger image]Page 485

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 484 [Click for larger image]Page 484

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 483 [Click for larger image]Page 483

Published in Volume XX — 1911
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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 3 (Jan., 1905), page 272

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    whom we met whether we could cross the mountain to-day. He said: Yes, and told us that some one was living on the mountain with whom we could have an opportunity to stay over night. We believed it and drove to the mountain, but had to pass a large creek1 on the way. Then we tried whether we could ascend the mountain, but it was inmpossible because the foot of the mountain was too steep. We concluded therefore to unload and carry our baggage [on horseback] up on the mountain. Bro. Lischer and Pfeil stayed with the wagon, the rest went up the mountain. Wheni we had covered half of the way it began to rain. It was also difficult for our horses, but we hoped to find the house on top of the mountain, of which the man had spoken. It took us a long time to ascend and when we finally reached the top no house nor water could be found. We were therefore compelled also to descend the mountain, although it was very dark and rained fast. Finally after many vain wishes we reached a little creek in the valley. It had taken us two and a half hours to cross this mountain.2 We then camped, as well as we could, but experienced much difficulty in starting a fire, for it rained very fast and everything was wet. We raised our tent and lay down upon the wet blankets. Here we rested for a while. To-wards morning it cleared and became very cold. On November 3, we went very early back across the mountain to get the rest of the baggage and the wagon. Bro. Gottlob, Nathanael and Kalberland meanwhile stayed with the tent. The brethren who had remained with the wagon also had had a cold night, and we were glad to see them again. We put our baggage once more on our horses and then carried most of our things to the top of the mountain. Here we made a fire and Bro. Haberland staved there. The rest of the brethren went back again to bring up the wagon, which was pretty empty. But we had to push very hard to get the wagon up. After an hour and a half we reached the top safely. After we had loaded the wagon again we drove up hill for a short distance. 1 This large creek is probably Back creek, which is due south of the Roanoke River. 2 This mountain, which gave the Moravian travelers so much trouble, was no doubt the Blue Ridge, which they crossed at Magotty Gap.

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  • History – Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico & Louisiana, Front cover (inside)

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 391

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

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    personally he had no objection, but explicit orders had been received from "Charlestown," according to which none should have permission to preach, except he had been ordained or licensed by the Bishop of London. He advised me, therefore, to preach in the manner of our Bro. Boehler* and others in my house. Besides, he said, he did not know whether I were a Capuchin [monk] or a teacher of languages, running about through the country. And, in case I were a follower of Zinzendorf, I might have as heretical doctrines as my Bro. Hagen.† Finally, he did not know our doctrines, for although he had read some of our books, there had not been in them a real exposition of our teaching, and he would ask Bro. Boehler to send biun such books, which would be thankfully received. He wished me much success and blessing in my work for the conversion of many souls. As for himself, he had not been able to accomplish much with his sermons among the Germans, because their hearts were very hard. Yet he would continue to preach as there was nobody else. On the following day I visited the Germans in the country, but found few hearts with a desire for the Saviour. Abraham Bininger's‡ brother told me that he had long intended to move * Rev. Peter Boehler was, after Spangenberg. the most prominent leader of the Moravians in America. Born December 31, 1712, in Frankfort-on-the-Main. Ordained December I6, 1737, by Zinzendorf. Sent to Georgia, where he arrived on September 29, 1738. When the settlement in Georgia was abandoned, he returned with Whitefield to Pennsylvania in 1740. Ordained Bishop in 1748. For many years one of the superintendents of the American congregations, carrying on his work with great diligence and success. Died April 27, 1775, in London. His efficient labors are worthily commemorated by J. R. Lockwood, Memorials of the Life of Peter Boehler, Bishop of the Church of the United Brethren, London, i868. † John Hagen, from Brandenburg, was sent in 1740 to labor among the Cherokees in Georgia. Came to Bethlehem in February, 1742. Labored later among the Delawares, the Susquehanna Indians and the Mohicans of New York. Died at Shamokin, September 16, 1747. Note of Mr. J. W. Jordan in Moravian of April 4, 1878. ‡ Abraham Buhninger, born in the Canton of Zurich, Switzerland. Emigrated to Purysburg, S. C. Settled finally at Bethlehem in 1745. Register of Moravians, p. 78.

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