Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 488 [Click for larger image]Page 488

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 487 [Click for larger image]Page 487

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 485 [Click for larger image]Page 485

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 484 [Click for larger image]Page 484

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 483 [Click for larger image]Page 483

Published in Volume XX — 1911
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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 381

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 381 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 4 (Apr., 1904), page 381

    lodged in an English house, where the people received us willingly, because they had also lived in Pennsylvania. On December 2nd, we went fifteen miles without finding a house. We then came to the large "Ronok" [Roanoke] River at Iden's Ferry, which is the boundary between Carolina and Virginia. We went twenty miles farther and stayed with English people. They said that they had not heard a sermon for several months. On December 3rd, I visited a German, who lives here among English people. His name is Zolikoffer, a Swiss.* He received us very kindly and showed us much love. He related to us much of his life; that he had been an officer in the army and had had much money. Then he had traveled to America out of curiosity. When he returned to Europe, he was taken before the King and the princes to describe to them the conditions in America. Finally he had again come back to America and had stayed here. His story prevented me from telling him something about the Saviour. On the 4th, we came, towards ten o'clock, to a large creek, called Stony Creek. It seemed to be dangerous to pass through, but we risked it and waded across safely. Afterwards we did not find a house for eleven miles. Towards evening we found one, where we lodged. On the 5th, we were taken across the " Duerr " [Tar] River. We passed many swamps. The way was difficult to find. To-wards evening we were rowed across the "Cotendne " [Contentnea] River. We had still two miles to the nearest house, but got into a Carolinian swamp, with so much water and mud in it that nobody passes through on foot, but only on horseback. Although I called loudly for help, when I heard a dog bark, * A few years prior to 1738, Colonel William Byrd, of Westover, endeavored to locate a colony of Swiss on the Roanoke river. The venture, however, proved a failure. In 1738, Colonel Byrd published a work entitled Meu-Gefundnes Eden in Virginia [New-Found Eden in Virginia]. It was printed at St. Gall, in Switzerland, and its purpose was to induce Swiss and German immigrants to settle in Virginia, especially in the Roanoke Valley. For the time being, Colonel Byrd became a German and his name appears as Wilhelm Vogel. This work is rare. A copy is to be found in John Carter Brown Library, Providence, R. I.

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 48

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 48 [Click for larger image]Page 48

    A VANISHING RACE. MRS. JENNIE C. MORTON. Frankfort, Ky. Read by the author before the Ohio Valley Historical Association, at their meeting with the Kentucky State Historical Society in the New Capitol, October 16th, 1909. Whether we call the Indian, North American or South American, we know the Indian race historically as a peculiar and distinctly marked people—disappearing gradually into oblivion. An authentic history of the race has not been written, but the traditions concerning it, tinged with probability, is that the race is descended from those fierce and terrible Asiatics, the Tartars. The pathways of the Indian, unlike any other nation of equal intelligence wandering down through the ages, are reddened with the blood of the slain, or they are smoking with human sacrifices, to gratify their horrible thirst for capture or revenge, and barbaric amusement. Students of Ethnology are agreed upon the origin of the Indian as a branch of the Asiatic people we have mentioned, because of the resemblance of some tribes on our Continent, to the Japanese in cast of feature; but the stern and forbidding statures and smileless faces of the Indian limit the resemblance, if indeed it exists. This article is not written to reproduce in history an account of the revolting habits, customs, manners, arts and language of this strange race. Only that which arrests the attention now of civilized people in their efforts to train, control, civilize and educate it, should be dwelt upon. However senseless to us—their arts and their ideas. Their weird and wonderful fables-yet they are above our contempt. and beyond our ridicule, these brown simoons of humanity—the Indians. They have been driven from every country and every

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Illustrations (inside)

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Illustrations (inside) [Click for larger image]Illustrations (inside)

    Illustrations; William H. West; Perry Leaving the Lawrence for the Niagara; Mouth of Cascade Creek, Where Perry's Fleet ws Built; Perry's Battle Flag; Put-in-Bay — Smoke of Battle in Distance; Oliver Hazard Perry; The Perry Medal; Jesse Duncan Elliott; Perry Monument, Cleveland, Ohio; Brady's Leap — Draper MSS, Map; Scene of Brady's Leap

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