Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 488 [Click for larger image]Page 488

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 487 [Click for larger image]Page 487

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 485 [Click for larger image]Page 485

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 484 [Click for larger image]Page 484

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

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Published in Volume XX — 1911
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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 467

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 467 [Click for larger image]Page 467

    stimulation of his firm assurance that all is well here below and all will be better in the world beyond. His life was above reproach, his career an inspiration. None knew him but to love him, none named him but to praise. No organization with which h e was connected seemed to give him greater pleasure than the Archaeological and Historical Society. Its field of investigation, its province of collecting and preserving the records of the past and its work of storing the same for future generations of students, particularly appealed to his intellectual activities and his fondness for knowledge of what has been, what is and what may be. In the pantheon of those who have been most potent in the origin and growth of this Society—the memory of no one will be more permanent or more revered than that of Roeliff Brinkerhoff. SITE OF FORT GOWER. An interesting and in forming volume could be written on Little Journeys to Historic Sites in Ohio, and it is one of the dreams of the Editor of the Quarterly to some day put forth such a volume. Meanwhile, as time permits such "little journeys" are being made. It was on a brilliant day last August (1911) that the Editor "tripped" to what in some respects is one of the most historic sites in Ohio. Many articles have been penned and published on the pioneer forts of Ohio. No state in the Northwest Territory can boast of as many stockades in the early days as can the Buckeye commonwealth. Romantic, dramatic and patriotic are the records of many of them. The French fort of 1745 a t the mouth of the Sandusky, the scene of Nicholas' conspiracy; the stockade defense at Loramie's on the Pickawillany, the scene of the prelude of the contest between the French and the British for the Northwest Territory; the first fort built by the Americans, in the American Revolution, the famous Fort Laurens near the present site of Bolivar; Fort Stephenson (Fremont) on the Sandusky, the scene of the siege of Croghan's little band attacked by Proctor and his British veterans aided by Tecumseh and his horde of western savages, in the War of 1812; there are few stories in warfare equal to it for display of bravery and patriotism. But the fort least known to general history—for it is not mentioned by any of the leading historians—and yet most significant in western annals, for an event connected therewith, is Fort Gower at the mouth of the Hocking, or Hockhocking, as it was once called from the Indian name " Hockin-hockin." It was the year 1774 in the month of June that the English Parliament passed the detested Quebec Act—an affirmation of the previous so-called Quebec Act of 1763. This act of 1774, provided a government for the Province o f Quebec, embracing the territorial domain west and north of the Ohio River—known later as the Northwest Territory.

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Front cover

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Front cover [Click for larger image]Front cover

    Prehistoric Earthworks in Wisconsin, The Place of the Ohio Valley in America, A Vanishing Race, Some Local History, Delaware in the Days of 1812, Tarhe — The Crane, General Harmar's Expedition, Four Cycles: A Centennial Ode, Jefferson's Ordinance of 1784, Rufus Putnam Memorial Association, William Henry Rice — In Memoriam, The Bunch of Grapes Tavern, General Roeliff Brinkerhoff, Site of Fort Gower, The Ice Age in North America, The Wilderness Trail, Poems on Ohio, Logan — The Mingo Cheif, 1710-1780: Draper Manuscripts, The Kendal Community, The Ohio River, Birthplace of Little Turtle, Recollections of Newark, Ohio, A Visit to Fort Ancient, Pipe's Cliff, The Cincinnati Municipal Elections of 1828, Oberlin's Part in the Slavery Conflict, Twenty-Sixth Annual Meeting of the Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society, May 31, 1911, To Cincinnati, A Prophecy, General Roeliff Brinkerhoff, Celebration of the Surrender of General John H. Morgan, Early Steamboat Travel on the Ohio River, That Old Log House Where Used to be Our Farm, William H. West, The Battle of Lake Erie in Ballad and History, and, Brady's Leap

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 147

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 147 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 147

    settled by Irish28 and English people. Immediately behind "Augusti Court House" the bad road begins. (There are two roads here, the one to the right goes to Carolina.) The road ran up and down continually, and we had either to push the wagon or keep it back with ropes which we had fastened to the rear. There was no lack of water, for every two miles we met creeks. We pitched our tent eight miles this side of "Augusti Courthouse," close to a spring and an old dilapidated house. Bro. Loesch went to several plantations to buy feed for our horses. But the people had none themselves. However, they were very friendly and regretted that they could not help us. On October 25, we continued our journey. After having gone half a mile we found two roads. We took the one to the left. We had no water for five miles. A mile farther we breakfasted. Then we rode six miles and ate dinner at a beautiful spring. We met two Sabbatarians [Siebentaeger]29 who had been in Carolina 28The missionaries in this diary invariably refer to the Scotch-Irish settlers as Irish, which is clearly an error. The history of the Scotch-Irish in Virginia has been so admirably written by Mr. Joseph A. Waddell in his Annals of Augusta County that further reference to them is unnecessary. 29 These Sabbatarians were evidently members of the Ephrata colony at the New river. (See Virginia Magazine, Vol. XI, 125, 234.) An interesting visit to this settlement is described by Dr. Thomas Walker in his Journal of an Expedition in the Spring of the Year 1750 Boston, 1888. On March 16, 1750, he writes: "We kept up the Staunton to William Englishes [near Blacksburg, Montgomery Co., Va.] He lives on a small branch, and was not much hurt by the Fresh. He has a mill which is the furthest back except one lately built by the sect of people, who call themselves the Brotherhood of Euphrates [Ephrata] and are commonly called Dunkards, who are the upper inhabitants on the New River, which is about 400 yards wide at their place. They live on the west side and we were obliged to swim our Horses over. The Dunkards are an odd people who make it a matter of Religion not to shave their Beards, ly on Beds, or eat Flesh, though at present, in the last they transgress, being constrained to it, as they say, by the want of a sufficiency of Grain & Roots, they having not long been seated here. I doubt the plenty and deliciousness of Venison & Turkeys has contributed not a little to this. The unmarried have no private Property, but live on a common Stock. They don't baptize either young or old, they keep their Sabbath on Saturday, and

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