Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 488 [Click for larger image]Page 488

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 487 [Click for larger image]Page 487

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 485 [Click for larger image]Page 485

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 484 [Click for larger image]Page 484

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 483 [Click for larger image]Page 483

Published in Volume XX — 1911
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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 140

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 140 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XII, No. 2 (Oct., 1904), page 140

    On October 15, we started on our way at three o'clock. We had moonlight and a good road and about eighty miles to Frederickstown [Winchester]. But for twelve miles to "Shippestown", [Shippensburg]13 a little town, we had no water. Here we had our wagon fixed, because the tongue had been somewhat damaged. The blacksmith was very expensive, and the work was poorly done. We saw the Blue Mountains. about eight to ten miles to our right. We had exceptionally fine weather. Eight miles farther we came to the "Kanikatschik" [Conococheague], which is here about as large as the "Manakis" [Monocacy] at Bethlehem. Here we took our dinner. A few miles farther we stayed over night at Colonel Chimipersen's Mill,14 where we had good water. Bro. Nathanael conducted the evening worship. On October 16, Bro. Grube led the morning worship. At four o'clock we continued our journey. On the way we bought ten bushels of oats from an Irishman and after we had traveled five miles farther we breakfasted at a little creek, where Irish people have settled. Two miles farther we found good water. We traveled three miles to a house on the left, set back from the road a short distance. One mile farther we came to a tavern. We could see the Blue Mountains again very distinctly. After another mile we came to a German tavern. Here we bought some hay and took our dinner. Two miles this side of the tavern we passed the boundary of Pennsylvania and Maryland. We heard that Maryland is only six miles wide at this point. From the Susquehanna to this place mostly Irish people have settled. They have good land, but little or nothing can be bought of them. Two and a half miles farther on we came to an old Swiss settler from whom we bought some hay. He was very friendly and asked us to call again. One mile farther we came to a German, from whom we bought some cabbage, which came very handy to us. We continued for several miles and came to a place two miles this side bf the "Patomik," where we stayed 13 Shippensburg was laid out in 1749 by Edward Shippen. 14 The distance from Shippensburg proves this mill to have been Col. Chambers's mill at Chambersburg. See Scull's Map of Pennsylvania, 1759.

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  • History – Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico & Louisiana, page 7

    Thirty-One Years of Organized Work in Oklahoma,
    Texas, New Mexico and Louisiana by
    Church of the Brethren from 1891 to 1922

    page 7 — History: Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico & Louisiana [Click for larger image] title=page 7

    they were removed. A woman in Washita County expected to heal her husband of typhoid by prayer, but the neighbors had a physician come to administer for him. When she refused to give the medicine; she was given her choice of giving the medicine or going with the authorities to the insane asylum. She chose to give medicine. Between these extremes of belief and practice, we find numbers of good, loyal, upright, sane Christian men and women. These suggest to us some of the things that naturally fall to a chronicler of events in any state. Besides these various classes of religious experiences, we find one other thing of equal importance, i. e., the constitutional and social difference between the typical northerner and the typical southerner. In these states they have met and battled over the differences getting nowhere or being able to adjust themselves and get along fine. Many church differences have arisen be cause the North and South do things differently and the church leaders did not recognize this and could not adjust themselves. There are whole settlements of the same class of people, perhaps most from the same state or even town. These people have the same customs, religion, etc. Some of the difficulties in church have arisen thru close relationships among the members. One of the sad pages in Oklahoma history is of a church difference that went to court and in testifying one family was divided and after it was over the child declared that the mother had sworn to the untruth. Others of similar nature but not so grievous could be recorded of church troubles that were simply family differences carried into the church.

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  • Discussion #5 — A Dunkard's Honor

    A DUNKARD'S HONOR.


    A War Incident Which Testifies to the Honesty of the Sect.

    General E. P. Alexander in the Century.

    Near Hagerstown I had an experience with an old dunkard which gave me a high and lasting respect for the people of that faith. My scouts had had a horse transaction with this old gentleman, and he came to see me about it. He made no complaint, but said it was his only horse, and as the scouts had told him we had some hoof-sore horses we should have to leave behind, he came to ask if I would trade him one of those for his horse, as without one his crop would be lost.

    This blog entry stems from, and is in part courtesy of Dennis D. Roth, a co-worker in German Baptist Brethren research and documentation of Washington state.  During one of his online research trips he located the newspaper article in the left-hand column below and posted it to the Rootsweb's Brethren Mailing List on July 28, 2014.  Seeing the value in this wonderful find, I decided to make the spelling corrections, locate a proper source, and, make comments as an adjunct to it.  Enjoy!!!

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