Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover [Click for larger image]Back cover

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Back cover (inside) [Click for larger image]Back cover (inside)

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Blank page [Click for larger image]Blank page

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 488 [Click for larger image]Page 488

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 487 [Click for larger image]Page 487

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 486 [Click for larger image]Page 486

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 485 [Click for larger image]Page 485

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 484 [Click for larger image]Page 484

Published in Volume XX — 1911

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
Publications, Volume XX

Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 483 [Click for larger image]Page 483

Published in Volume XX — 1911
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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 255

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 255 [Click for larger image]Page 255

    THE CINCINNATI MUNICIPAL ELECTION OF 1828. MARY BAKER FURNESS, CINCINNATI. Cincinnati began its existence as a city under its first charter, March 1, 1819. By an act of the General Assembly passed January 26, 1827, a new charter was granted, which superseded the old one, and did away with all the legislation which had been enacted under it. According to this second charter, the city boundaries began with the "Ohio River, at the east corner of partial section No. 12, running west with the township line of Cincinnati to Mill Creek, then down Mill Creek with its meanders to the Ohio River, then eastwardly up said river with the southern boundary of the State of Ohio, to the place of beginning." The city area was coterminous with that of the township of Cincinnati. The northern boundary, as nearly as I can determine, was the line of Liberty Street extended to the Ohio on the east. The chief municipal officers under the second charter were, the mayor, elected biennially, and three trustees from each ward, who formed the council. The city was divided into four wards by two lines crossing at right angles, Third Street running east and west, Main Street running north and south. The First Ward was in the northeast, the Second in the northwest, the Third in the southeast and the Fourth in the southwest. March 2, 1827, by virtue of powers vested in them by the charter the council divided the Second Ward by an east and west line from Main Street a long Sixth to the corporation line. That portion north of Sixth and west of Main was the Fifth Ward. On March 21, 1827, the boundaries of the Third and First Ward were changed, by an east and west line, which "began on Main at the intersection of Third, and ran eastwardly along the center of Third to Ludlow, thence eastwardly along the center of Symmes to High, and along the center of High to a point on the street bearing north 16° from the center of the cupola of David Kilgour's house near the reservoir, and by the

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  • The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 231

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

    The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 231 [Click for larger image]The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Vol. XI, No. 3 (Jan., 1904), page 231

    An awakened shoemaker lives there, named Philip, who ought to be visited. Besides him, there is also a man, named Casper, an unmarried man and a weaver. He lives with one named Jaeger.* This man is also concerned about his salvation. The Rev. Mr. Klug sends his greetings to Bro. Joseph [Spangenberg], because he learned to know and love him on his arrival in Philadelphia, about ten years ago. VII. THE GREAT FORK OF THE RIPPEHANNING [RAPPAHANNOCK.†] It is situated about twenty-six miles from the Upper Germans towards the "Potomik." Three German families live there. * This was probably Nicholas Yager, a native of Wickersbach in Hesse (?) Germany, who was naturalized by Governor Spotswood July 13, 1722. He was then a resident of Spotsylvania county, Virginia. His son Adam was naturalized in 1730 by Governor Gooch. It is stated that he was born in Fulkenston, near Dusseldorf, in the duchy of Neuberg. See the Garr Genealogy, by John C. Garr, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1894. The descendants of Nicholas Yager are still to be found in Madison and adjoining counties of Virginia. † This was Germanna, founded in 1714, by Governor Spotswood. The first colonists consisted of twelve German Reformed families, who arrived in Virginia in the month of April, 1714. They came upon the solicitation of Baron de Graffenried to establish and operate for Governor Spotswood the iron works which they built about ten miles northwest of Fredericksburg. Their names were John Kemper, Jacob Holtzclaw, John and Herman Fishback, John Henry Hoffman, Herman Otterbach, Tillman Weaver, John Joseph Merdten, Peter Hitt, Joseph Counts, ——— Wayman, ——— Handbach. The names of these colonists are preserved in a letter written in 1814 by the Rev. James Kemper (1753-1834), of Cincinnati, Ohio, a Presbyterian clergyman of note in his day. His statements are fully corroborated by the deed and will books of Prince William, Fauquier and Culpeper counties, Virginia. The colonists came from Muesen and Siegen, situated in the principality of Nassau-Siegen, which is now a part of the Prussian province of Westphalia. Muesen has been an important iron centre since the year 1300. John Kemper, one of the original colonists at Germanna, and ancestor of the family of that name in Virginia, with many descendants in the West, was born at Muesen, July 8, 1692. He died in Virginia between the years 1754-'59. He was married in 1715 or 1716 to Ellsbeth (Alce) Otterbach, born in Siegen, Germany, May, 1689,

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  • Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], page 404

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society
    Publications, Volume XX

    Ohio Archæological and Historical Society Publications, Volume XX [1911], Page 404 [Click for larger image]Page 404

    WILLIAM H. WEST. BY WILLIAM Z. DAVIS. [The following is an address in memory of Judge William H. West, delivered by Hon. William Z. Davis, of the Ohio Supreme Court, at the meeting of the Ohio Bar Association, Cedar Point, July 12, 1911.] This writing is not a biography but an appreciation of one of the most notable members of the Ohio Bar in his generation. WILLIAM H. WEST.

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